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I know some think I shouldn't redefine non-virtual functions from inherited classes, however, what I'm doing now is using that very role-migration concept, and it is fairly special case where it fits quite nicely.

What I want is this (oh, and this is C++):

class A {
 public:
 void f() { doSomethingA(); }
};
class B : public A {
 public:
 void f() { A::f(); doSomethingB(); }
};

However, when I do this, A::f gets called with this == 0, which obviously results in segfault. Am I doing something wrong, or is this simply not possible? My current option is to resort to static functions and pass the object explicitly, but I'd prefer it this way.

Yes, I could call them differently, but that kind of defeats the purpose of making them look similar to the programmer. And I can't make them virtual for various reasons (the most prominent being the role-migration, that I actually want different behavior depending on what I use it as).

Any help appreciated

EDIT
Thank you all for answering, it appears I've stumbled upon a bug in my build environment, a minimal test case ran fine; and so did turning of optimizations. I guess I could have tried that before asking the question, but I usually assume I'm doing something wrong.

Nothing more to see here, move along.. Sorry for the inconvenience... :)

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Your B doesn’t inherit from A … typo? Apart from that, this code should actually work. –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 3 '10 at 15:15
    
@Konrad; yes, typo, sorry. –  falstro Nov 3 '10 at 15:18
    
@Konrad; I've double checked and there's no typo in the code, and yet I'm staring at the call stack in gdb where it clearly states B::f(this=0xffbfdb40) followed by A::f(this=0x0). –  falstro Nov 3 '10 at 15:27
    
This should work (when adding ; after the class declarations). Can you give some minimal example the reproduces the problem? –  sth Nov 3 '10 at 15:27
    
@sth; Haha, I always miss those, sorry, fixed that.. –  falstro Nov 3 '10 at 15:28

5 Answers 5

You didn't specify that B inherits from A:

class B : public A {
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Yeah, that was a typo, sorry. –  falstro Nov 3 '10 at 15:24
    
@roe: In that case, what does the calling code look like? –  Steve M Nov 3 '10 at 15:32

Assuming that B not inheriting from A is a typo (I can't see this compiling otherwise), it looks like the B pointer on which you originally call f is null. Check the original call point, because (assuming the typo) what you wrote should work.

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Yeah, that was a typo, sorry. I've double checked and there's no typo in the code, and yet I'm staring at the call stack in gdb where it clearly states B::f(this=0x123123) followed by A::f(this=0x0). –  falstro Nov 3 '10 at 15:25
    
Can you expand your code slightly into a small fully runnable example that exhibits the problem? –  Mark B Nov 3 '10 at 15:33

Your code doesn't seem to fit with the text very well. In the text, you talk about inheritance, but the code doesn't show any (and at least as-is, it shouldn't even compile).

If you do use inheritance:

class A { 
public:
    void f() { doSomethingA(); }
};

class B : public A { 
public:
    void f() { A::f(); doSomethingB(); }
};

Then when you invoke A::f(), this definitely should not be a NULL pointer -- it should be a valid pointer to the A "subobject" in the B object (as long as you use single inheritance, with most compilers it'll be the address of the object on which you invoked B::f(), just cast from B * const to A * const).

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Try

static_cast<A*>(this)->f()

Should work.

EDIT:

If it doesnt, check for this in B::f() first of all.

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Ignoring the "correctness" of doing this, there is nothing wrong with what you're describing. I'm assuming your example code would look more like the following though to actually have the inheritance you describe:

struct A {
 void f() { cout << "hi" << endl; }
};
struct B : public A {
 void f() { A::f(); }
};
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