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I don´t understand how to apply generic types in Scala correctly. I´ve managed to implement my own control structures ("unless", "ForEach"), but they are limited to "Int" types at the moment... Does anyone know how to change that implementation that works for generic types?!

The implementation doesn´t matter that much for me, but I really want to keep the control structures as they are now:

import Controls._ 

val Cond = false
val Elements = List(1,2,3)

Unless(Cond) {
  var sum = 0
  ForEach {
    sum += Element 
  } In(Elements) 
  println("The Sum: " + sum)
}

I tried it for hours, but I don´t know a solution for the problem with the type parameters. Here´s my "Int" limited implementation:

object Controls {

  def Unless(cond: => Boolean)(block: => Unit) = {
    if(!cond) block
  }

  var current = 0
  def ForEach(block: => Unit) = {
    new {
      def In(list:List[Int]) = {
        list foreach { i =>
          current = i
          block
        }
      }
    }
  }

  def Element = current

}

Any hint´s are very welcome as I´am really stuck right now...

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Basically, you want to inject a definition inside the Unless block parameter:

Unless
(Cond)
{ // you want Element available here
  var sum = 0
  ForEach {
    sum += Element 
  } In(Elements) 
  println("The Sum: " + sum)
}

You can't define it outside, because it would fix the type ahead of time. So I'll give you two solutions. First, the traditional way of injecting something into a block is by passing it as a paramter:

Unless(Cond) {
  var sum = 0
  ForEach { Element =>
    sum += Element 
  } In(Elements) 
  println("The Sum: " + sum)
}

You won't be able to get a code that works like that alone, because there is NOTHING available for the compiler to infer the type of Element. So either of these two changes would be needed:

  ForEach[int] { Element =>
  ForEach { Element: Int =>

The code for that would look like this:

object Controls {
  def Unless(cond: => Boolean)(block: => Unit) = {
    if(!cond) block
  }

  def ForEach[T](block: T => Unit) = {
    new {
      def In(list:List[T]) = {
        list foreach block
      }
    }
  }
}

The other solution is to make a factory of type-specific controls, like this:

object Controls {
  def apply[T] = new Controls[T]

  class Controls[T] {
    def Unless(cond: => Boolean)(block: => Unit) = {
      if(!cond) block
    }

    private var current: T = _
    def Element = current
    def ForEach(block: => Unit) = {
      new {
        def In(list:List[T]) = {
          list foreach { i =>
            current = i
            block
          }
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

Then you use it like this:

val controls = Controls[Int]; import controls._

And the rest works just as in your example.

share|improve this answer
    
I played a bit with your solution - perfect, thanks Daniel!! I was unaware of the fact that the compiler can infer a type parameter from a block-parameter as you have done it in the definition of "ForEach". I need to find a detailed documentation about type inference... –  Tom Myer Nov 4 '10 at 10:17
    
Ohh... now I definitely got it!! :) –  Tom Myer Nov 4 '10 at 10:32
def ForEach[T](block: => Unit): T = {
    var current: T = _
    new {
        def In(list: List[T]) = {
            list foreach { i =>
                current = i
                block
            }
        }
    }
    current
}

Should do the trick.

EDIT: And seeing as you use current after the ForEach method, you may want to change ForEach to return current. I edited the code snippet to reflect this.

share|improve this answer
    
I replaced my ForEach-Method with yours, but now I get: "Local variables must be initialized" - I´m new to Scala and I´ve never seen or used an initialization with an underscore this way: "var current: T = _" Can you explain what it does and how it should influece the code? –  Tom Myer Nov 3 '10 at 18:42
    
Initializing it to _ initializes it to the default for it's type. 0 for integers, null for object references, etc. –  alpha123 Nov 3 '10 at 18:51
    
thanks a bunch for your help, but I seems you are missing the problem. I want to use my custom control structures (!)as I use them right now(!) (see first code snippet on the page). I want "ForEach" to take a lazy code-block, then return an object with an "In" method that takes the collection to traverse. The method Element that is used in the ForEach block should always give the current element in the traversal. This already works for an "Int" based List but I want it to work for all kinds of types in the List. I hope I could clarify my needs, thanks again in every case!! –  Tom Myer Nov 3 '10 at 19:02
    
Has anyone else a hint? I am sorry but I can´t get it to work... –  Tom Myer Nov 3 '10 at 22:20
    
Oh. Looks like Daniel has something like that above me. Good luck. –  alpha123 Nov 4 '10 at 3:34

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