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File testDir = new File("C:\temp\test");
testDir.createNewFile();

As I understand it, the above will create a directory called test in the directory c:\temp

File testDir = new File("C:\temp\test.dir");
testDir.createNewFile();

As I understand it, the above will create a file called test.dir in the directory c:\temp

What should I be doing to the code above if I wish for test.dir to actually be a directory?

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Side note .. instead of putting the path separator in the file itself, you can use File.separator so that it works on DOS or Unix systems alike. –  CoolBeans Nov 3 '10 at 17:38

3 Answers 3

No, the first one will create a regular file - after all, that's what you asked it to do:

Atomically creates a new, empty file named by this abstract pathname if and only if a file with this name does not yet exist. The check for the existence of the file and the creation of the file if it does not exist are a single operation that is atomic with respect to all other filesystem activities that might affect the file.

Nothing there says it will create a directory. You'll want to escape the backslashes though, or it's trying to find C:<tab>emp<tab>est

If you want to create a directory, use File.mkdir or File.mkdirs(). You'll still need to escape the backslashes:

File testDir = new File("C:\\temp\\test.dir");
bool created = testDir.mkdir();

(Use mkdirs to create parent directories as well.) The return value tells you whether or not it actually created a directory.

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That's not true.

File.createFile() will create a file.

File.mkdir() creates a directory.

http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/io/File.html

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File testDir = new File("C:\temp\test");
testDir.createNewFile();

As I understand it, the above will create a directory called test in the directory c:\temp

Wrong - it will create file called "test". Files do not have to have a "filename extension".

To create a directory:

testDir.mkdir();

BTW, this kind of question is most easily and quickly answered by looking at the API doc. Do yourself a favor and get familiar with it.

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Thanks again for your help chaps. I didn't spot that mkdir function down the bottom there! :-( –  Ben Nov 3 '10 at 16:45

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