Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

During a recent code review a colleague suggested that, for class with 4 int properties, assigning each to zero in the constructor would result in a performance penalty.

For example,

    public Example()
    {
        this.major = 0;
        this.minor = 0;
        this.revision = 0;
        this.build = 0;
    }

His point was that this is redundant as they will be set to zero by default and you are introducing overhead by essentially performing the same task twice. My point was that the performance hit would be negligible if one existed at all and this is more readable (there are several constructors) as the intention of the state of the object after calling this constructor is very clear.

What do you think? Is there a performance gain worth caring about here?

share|improve this question
4  
Beware of premature (possible) optimization. –  jball Nov 3 '10 at 16:54
    
"Premature optimization is the root of all evil." –  Paul Sonier Nov 3 '10 at 16:54
3  
If this was programmers.stackexchange.com I'd answer from a readability point of view. Sure, it's not going to affect performance, but it adds noise to the source code. It's like, say, writing foreach (var item in someEnumerable.ToList()). –  Tim Robinson Nov 3 '10 at 16:57
    
i don't like them, they are redundant. –  Andrey Nov 3 '10 at 16:58

8 Answers 8

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I don't believe they're the same operation, and there is a performance difference. Here's a microbenchmark to show it:

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;

class With
{
    int x;

    public With()
    {
        x = 0;
    }
}


class Without
{
    int x;

    public Without()
    {
    }
}


class Test
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int iterations = int.Parse(args[0]);
        Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        if (args[1] == "with")
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
            {
                new With();
            }
        }
        else
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
            {
                new Without();
            }
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine(sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }
}

Results:

c:\Users\Jon\Test>test 1000000000 with
8427

c:\Users\Jon\Test>test 1000000000 without
881

c:\Users\Jon\Test>test 1000000000 with
7568

c:\Users\Jon\Test>test 1000000000 without
819

Now, would that make me change the code? Absolutely not. Write the most readable code first. If it's more readable with the assignment, keep the assignment there. Even though a microbenchmark shows it has a cost, that's still a small cost in the context of doing any real work. Even though the proportional difference is high, it's still creating a billion instances in 8 seconds in the "slow" route. My guess is that there's actually some sort of optimization for completely-empty constructors chaining directly to the completely empty object() constructor. The difference between assigning to two fields and only assigning to one field is much smaller.

In terms of while the compiler can't optimize it out, bear in mind that a base constructor could be modifying the value by reflection, or perhaps a virtual method call. The compiler could potentially notice those, but it seems a strange optimization.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jon, always appreciate bench tests etc. in an answer. –  Peter Kelly Nov 3 '10 at 22:18

No, there is not. The compiler will optimize out these operations; the same task will not be performed twice. Your colleague is wrong.

[Edit based upon input from the always-excellent Jon Skeet]

The compiler SHOULD optimize out the operations, but apparently they are not completely optimized out; however, the optimization gain is completely negligible, and the benefit from having the assignment be so explicit is good. Your colleague may not be completely wrong, but they're focusing on a completely trivial optimization.

share|improve this answer
7  
Which compiler are you saying will optimize it? The C# compiler doesn't, as far as I can tell. –  Jon Skeet Nov 3 '10 at 16:57
1  
I don't think they are the same operation. One is a memory wipe, the other is explicit assignment. I see no reason to assume this would be removed. –  Marc Gravell Nov 3 '10 at 16:57
    
You're missing here the optimization the JIT/Runtime does. I'm pretty sure this is optimized away. [Edit:] Could be only some runtimes optimize it away. –  Dykam Nov 3 '10 at 17:58

My understanding is that objects memory is cleared to zero with a simple and very fast memory wipe. these explicit assignments, however, will take additional IL. Indeed, some tools will spot you assigning the default value (in a field initialiser) and advise against it.

So I would say: don't do this - it is potentially marginally slower. But not by much. In short I think your friend is correct.

Unfortunately I'm on a mobile device right now, without the right tools to prove it.

share|improve this answer

You should focus on code clarity, that is the most important thing. If performance becomes an issue, then measure performance, and see what your bottlenecks are, and improve them. It's not worth it to spend so much time worrying about performance when ease of understanding code is more important.

share|improve this answer

You can initialize them as fields directly:

public int number = 0;

And is also clear.

share|improve this answer
    
And is also optimized away by the compiler. –  McKay Nov 3 '10 at 16:57
1  
@McKay: Evidence of this? –  Jon Skeet Nov 3 '10 at 17:01
1  
As far as I know is NOT optimized by the compiler but the performance penalty is so so low that it is not even worth calling it a "penalty". –  Liviu M. Nov 3 '10 at 17:02
1  
I also did a billion tests of 5 different ways of doing it. No initialization (21.9 sec), field initialization to 0 (26.4 sec), field initialization to 1 (25.2 sec), constructor to 0 (24.7 seconds), constructor to 1 (24.2 seconds). It's all really close, but not initializing is trivially faster, followed by constructor initialization, then surprisingly direct field initialization. Also surpirsing is that initializing to 1 is about half a billionth of a second faster than initializing to 0! –  McKay Nov 3 '10 at 19:08

The more important question is: Is there a really readability gain? If the people who are maintaining the code already know that ints are assigned to zero, this is just some more code they have to parse. Perhaps the code would be cleaner without lines that do nothing.

share|improve this answer

In fact, I'd use the assignment in constructor, just for readability, and for marking the 'I didn't forget to initialize those' intention. Relying on default behavior tends to confuse another developers.

share|improve this answer

I don't think you should care about performance hit, usually there are many other places where program can be optimized. On the other hand I don't see any gain from specifying these values in the constructor since they are going to be set to 0 anyway.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.