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I'm kind of new to threading in C# and had a couple of questions about what is out there:

  • What are the ways to implement threads in C#? (i.e. I can think of two off the top: backgroundWorker, Thread, etc)

    • How do you cause deadlock and if there is deadlock how do you get out of it (in C#)?

    • How does backgroundworker get implemented? It seems to have an underlying set of methods, but I'd like to know what those methods and instantiations are...

Thanks!

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5 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The definitive beginner's guide to threading in C# is here: http://www.albahari.com/threading/

The documentation on BackgroundWorker, with a complete working example, is here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.componentmodel.backgroundworker.aspx

Deadlocks are explained here: http://www.albahari.com/threading/part2.aspx

Threads can be implemented in many ways. You can use them directly, pull them from a ThreadPool, or use them indirectly using the Task Parallel Library.

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What are the ways to implement threads in C#?

There are various different ways to take advantage of threading; some involving the explicit creation of threads while others take advantage of already running threads.

How do you cause deadlock and if there is deadlock how do you get out of it (in C#)?

Here are 3 different ways you can cause a deadlock. This list is not exhaustive.

Call a blocking method from within a lock section.

In this example thread A acquires a lock and then immediately calls a blocking method while at the same time thread B attempts to acquire the same lock, but gets hung because thread A is waiting for thread B to signal the event before it will release the lock.

public class Example
{
  ManualResetEvent m_Event = new ManualResetEvent(false);

  void ThreadA()
  {
    lock (this)
    {
      m_Event.WaitOne();
    }
  }

  void ThreadB()
  {
    lock (this)
    {
      m_Event.Set();
    }
  }
}

Acquire two locks out of order.

No explanation is needed here since this is a well known problem.

public class Example
{
  private object m_LockObjectA = new object();
  private object m_LockObjectB = new Object();

  void ThreadA()
  {
    lock (m_LockObjectA) lock (m_LockObjectB) { }
  }

  void ThreadB()
  {
    lock (m_LockObjectB) lock (m_LockObjectA) { }
  }
}

The lock-free deadlock.

This is one my favorite illustrations of a deadlock because no lock or blocking method is involved. The subtlety of the problem is enough to confound even those who are familiar with threading. The issue here is related to the absence of memory barriers. Thread A waits for thread B to set the signal flag while at the same time thread B waits for thread A to reset it, all the while neither thread is seeing the changes the other is making because the compiler, JIT, and hardware are free to optimize the reads and writes of the flag in manner that is non-intuitive.

public class Example
{
  private bool m_Signal = false;

  void ThreadA()
  {
    while (!m_Signal);
    m_Signal = false;
  }

  void ThreadB()
  {
    m_Signal = true;
    while (m_Signal);
  }
}

How does backgroundworker get implemented?

Here is a very simple step-by-step procedure to get you started.

  1. Add an event handler that performs the actual work to the DoWork event.
  2. Add an event handler to receive progress information to the ProgressChanged event.
  3. Add an event handler that will be executed upon completion to the RunWorkerCompleted event.
  4. Call RunWorkerAsync from the UI thread to start the background operation. This raises the DoWork event on a separate thread.
  5. Call ReportProgress periodically from the DoWork event handler to publish new progress information. This raises the ProgressChanged event on the UI thread.
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Thanks for the detail here. I'm wondering when you declare "lock(this)", what exactly does that do? I tried reading here also msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/c5kehkcz(VS.71).aspx but it's a bit ambiguous from the wording. Why are we passing in an argument and what is the argument for? –  locoboy Nov 4 '10 at 6:26
    
@cfarm54: Despite the natural intuition it does not lock access to this. It uses the this reference as the identifier for a guarded section of code. Any section acquiring a lock using the same reference will be grouped with the other sections. –  Brian Gideon Nov 4 '10 at 19:28
    
Thanks for the help. Why does the guarded section of code need an identifier when the code to be guarded is right below it? –  locoboy Nov 4 '10 at 20:09
    
@cfarm54: It is so that you can group sections of code in a manner that does not cause blocking with other unrelated sections. For example, you would not want the locking internal to the Semaphore class interferring with the locking schemes in your own code. Or maybe code sections A and B need to be synchronized together and sections C & D get synchronized independently of A and B. –  Brian Gideon Nov 4 '10 at 20:28
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.net 4 offers parallel LINQ. This is very nice if you want to parallelize a side-effect free calculation which is easily expressible in functional/linq style.

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For all common uses and purposes, use Thread. If you want to communicate from some thread to GUI, you may think of using BackgroundWorker, because it will automatically serialize (with Invoke() ) calls to GUI methods so you won't have GUI locking issues.

And as the deadlocks are concerned, don't worry about them. Deadlocks are possible only if you have 2 threads competing for the same set of resources, and I guess you won't tackle that just yet.

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new Thread() is often the worst choice for doing multithreaded programming in .NET. –  Rob Fonseca-Ensor Nov 3 '10 at 22:23
    
I use it every so often with no problems. Any article on that? –  Daniel Mošmondor Nov 3 '10 at 22:31
    
why is new Thread the worst choice? –  locoboy Nov 4 '10 at 8:12
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I would classify the answer into 3 sections. So with .net 4.0 all the examples above fall under 3 major categories: 1. Threads managed by .net thread pool (asynchronous delegate invocation, backgroundworker, etc) 2. The thread class - you have to manage the lifetime of the thread yourself and finally Parallel Linq which requires multi core CPU.

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