Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm learning about class inheritance and such in my Java course right now, but I don't understand. When would I use the "super()" call?

Edit:
I found this example of code where super.variable is used:

class A
{
        int k = 10;
}
class Test extends A
{
    public void m()
    {
        System.out.println(super.k);
    }
}

So I understand that here, you must use super to access the k variable in the super-class. However, in any other case, what does super(); do? On its own?

share|improve this question
10  
Actually, in this example super is not required to reference k. k can be referenced directly. super would only be required to access A.k if you declared another field named k in Test (Test.k). –  Mark Peters Nov 3 '10 at 19:32
add comment

9 Answers

up vote 44 down vote accepted

Calling exactly super() is always redundant. It's explicitly doing what would be implicitly done otherwise. That's because if you omit a call to the super constructor, the no-argument super constructor will be invoked automatically anyway. Not to say that it's bad style; some people like being explicit.

However, where it becomes useful is when the super constructor takes arguments that you want to pass in from the subclass.

public class Animal {
   private final String noise;
   protected Animal(String noise) {
      this.noise = noise;
   }

   public void makeNoise() {
      System.out.println(noise);
   }
}

public class Pig extends Animal {
    public Pig() {
       super("Oink");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You can remove the "As far as I can remember". –  Mot Nov 3 '10 at 19:40
add comment

super is used to call the constructor, methods and properties of parent class.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for being the only one to mention super.someMethod() besides the constructors. –  Stephen P Nov 3 '10 at 19:46
add comment

When you want the super class constructor to be called - to initialize the fields within it. Take a look at this article for an understanding of when to use it:

http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/IandI/super.html

share|improve this answer
2  
As it says in the link, you never have to call super(), as Java will implicitly add it. But you do have to call super(args) if you need a non-default parent constructor. –  Michael Brewer-Davis Nov 3 '10 at 19:32
add comment

You would use it as the first line of a subclass constructor to call the constructor of it's parent class.

For example:

public class TheSuper{
    public TheSuper(){
        eatCake();
    }
}

public class TheSub extends TheSuper{
    public TheSub(){
        super();
        eatMoreCake();
    }
}

Constructing an instance of TheSub would call both eatCake() and eatMoreCake()

share|improve this answer
1  
You forgot the semicolons. And no, the super invocation (without parameters) is redundant, because Java does it automatically if omitted. –  Mot Nov 3 '10 at 19:39
2  
Programming in Python for too long will do that to a man –  TartanLlama Nov 3 '10 at 19:41
add comment

Super will call your parent method. See: http://leepoint.net/notes-java/oop/constructors/constructor-super.html

share|improve this answer
add comment

You call super() to specifically run a constructor of your superclass. Given that a class can have multiple constructors, you can either call a specific constructor using super() or super(param,param) oder you can let Java handle that and call the standard constructor. Remember that classes that follow a class hierarchy follow the "is-a" relationship.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You may also use the super keyword in the sub class when you want to invoke a method from the parent class when you have overridden it in the subclass.

Example:

Public Class CellPhones {
   Public void printMethod() {
     system.out.println("I'm a cellphone");
   }
}

Public Class TouchPhones extends CellPhones {
  // overriding the printMethod in Cellphones class
  Public void printMethod() {
     super.printMethod();
     system.out.println("I'm a touch screen cell phone");
  }
  Public static void main (strings[] args) {
    TouchPhones p = new TouchPhones();
    p.printMethod();
  }
}

Here, the super.printMethod() line invokes the printMethod() from the CellPhones class. Output will be:

I'm a cellphone
I'm a touch screen cell phone
share|improve this answer
add comment

You could use it to call a superclass's method (such as when you are overriding such a method, super.foo() etc) -- this would allow you to keep that functionality and add on to it with whatever else you have in the overriden method.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The first line of your subclass' constructor must be a call to super() to ensure that the constructor of the superclass is called.

share|improve this answer
    
Not true. It'll happen automatically. –  Mark Peters Nov 3 '10 at 19:38
    
Even if there's no default constructor? How will it know what to pass? –  robev Nov 3 '10 at 19:43
    
If there's no default constructor, you need to call super(some args), not super(). But the point is, "must" is wrong. One of the super class's constructors is guaranteed to be called as long as the class compiles. –  Mark Peters Nov 3 '10 at 19:45
    
I didn't make it clear that when I wrote super() I didn't mean a constructor with no parameters, I just didn't feel like writing any. And yes I meant you needed to call it or it won't compile, that's why I said must. –  robev Nov 3 '10 at 20:55
1  
Once again, you do NOT need an explicit call to a super constructor if there exists a no-arg constructor in the parent class. A super constructor will always be called, whereas your phrasing makes it sound like you're in danger of a super constructor not being called if you don't put super(...) in. There is absolutely no danger of that; just danger that it won't compile. –  Mark Peters Nov 4 '10 at 14:45
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.