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I have a DATE column with a date in it but I need to query it to find records less than 30 days old.

START_DATE
----------
01-AUG-2010
09-AUG-2010
22-AUG-2010
09-SEP-2010

Query:

SELECT START_DATE
 WHERE START_DATE < 30;

I know it is simple Query in ORACLE SQL but i am doing something wrong.

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3  
how is it possible you have been here a year, asked 6 questions and never accepted an answer? Please accept the answer that works for you to encourage responses and to note it for anyone else who has your issue down the road and uses this question as a resource. –  JNK Nov 3 '10 at 20:06
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He's also never voted for anything. So in other words, a leech. –  Paul Tomblin Nov 3 '10 at 20:09
1  
possible duplicate of Oracle SQL Where clause to find date records older than 30 days –  APC Nov 4 '10 at 5:28

3 Answers 3

up vote -1 down vote accepted

WHERE START_DATE > SYSDATE - 1

or perhaps

WHERE TRIM(STARTDATE) > TRIM(SYSDATE) - 1

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I think in Oracle that adding (or subtracting) a number to a date adds that many days, so you just subtracted 1 day from sysdate. Also, I'm not sure why you would trim sysdate. –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Nov 3 '10 at 20:05
1  
@FrustratedWithFormsDesigner: I think he meant TRUNC, but it's not good to run against the table column. –  OMG Ponies Nov 3 '10 at 20:07
    
Yes, right mistyped 1 instead of 30 :) –  maximdim Nov 3 '10 at 20:11
    
but what's a little off-by-29 error between friends? ;) –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Nov 3 '10 at 20:18
    
@FrustratedWithFormsDesigner: Exactly :) –  maximdim Nov 4 '10 at 0:45

Use:

SELECT t.start_date
  FROM YOUR_TABLE t
 WHERE t.start_date > SYSDATE - 30
  • SYSDATE is Oracle's syntax to get the current date and time
  • In Oracle, you can do date arithmetic in the context of days, so SYSDATE - 30 means "current date, subtract thirty days" to get a date that is thirty days in the past

If you want to evaluate the date based on thirty days as of midnight, use the TRUNC function:

SELECT t.start_date
  FROM YOUR_TABLE t
 WHERE t.start_date > TRUNC(SYSDATE) - 30

Don't run TRUNC on the column - that will render an index on the column useless, ensuring a table scan.

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Alternatively, you could try where months_between (sysdate,t.start_date) <= 1. Though I think you might get slightly different results, depending on the lengths of the months in question. months_between exists on Oracle, but I don't know if any other databases implement similar functionality. –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Nov 3 '10 at 20:18
    
@FrustratedWithFormsDesigner: True, but adding/subtracting a month isn't guaranteed to be thirty days -- IE subtract a month from March 29th... :) –  OMG Ponies Nov 3 '10 at 20:21
    
True. Sometimes requirements say "3 months prior to..." and sometimes they say "90 days prior to..." and some people seem to think they are equivalent so they say one when they mean the other. So then I code to one standard only to find out they meant it the other way... –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Nov 3 '10 at 20:26
    
@FrustratedWithFormsDesigner: Yeah, I'm a stickler for finite requirements - counter productive for Agile development in general, but I don't see the point in coding for something the client doesn't comprehend either. Waste of our time, and their money... but some need it to grasp what they really want :/ –  OMG Ponies Nov 3 '10 at 20:29
SELECT t.start_date
  FROM YOUR_TABLE t
 WHERE t.start_date > SYSDATE - INTERVAL '30' DAY;

INTERVAL is more portable than assuming that you can add or subtract days, although I've noticed some slight differences in the INTERVAL syntax between Oracle and PostgreSQL.

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Date handling isn't very portable between databases, sadly. –  OMG Ponies Nov 3 '10 at 20:07

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