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I'm using Ruby 1.8.7. I have the following array of hashes. I need to sort by the boolean value first, but those results must be ordered as well in the original order. I basically need to shift all the true hashes to the top of the array but maintain the original ordering.

Any help would be appreciated!

array = [{:id => 1, :accepts => false}, 
         {:id => 2, :accepts => false}, 
         {:id => 3, :accepts => true}, 
         {:id => 4, :accepts => false}, 
         {:id => 5, :accepts => true}]

sorted = array.sort do |x, y|
  if x[:accepts] == y[:accepts]
    0
  elsif x[:accepts] == true
    -1
  elsif x[:accepts] == false
    1
  end
end

This sort that I have yields:

5 - true
3 - true
2 - false
4 - false
1 - false

I need it to yield:

3 - true
5 - true
1 - false
2 - false
4 - false

share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This does the job:

array.sort{|a,b| (a[:accepts] == b[:accepts]) ? ((a[:id] < b[:id]) ? -1 : 1) : (a[:accepts] ? -1 : 1)}
share|improve this answer
    
Bingo! Thanks a million Philip! –  Nick Nov 3 '10 at 20:27
    
You're welcome! ;) –  Philip Nov 3 '10 at 21:07
    
I don't like this solution because it does NOT keep original order which was mentioned by author as an requirement. It instead implies that :id is already ordered and misuses this as a helper key. –  hurikhan77 Nov 3 '10 at 22:56
    
Maybe this was a requirement set because he was used to another language. The Ruby Array class doesn't know operations that can change an elements position. IMHO sticking to the build-in functions is an important thing when using Ruby because it saves performance. (Especially with MRI.) But the code does not imply pre-ordering, try it out with irb. –  Philip Nov 3 '10 at 23:37
    
@hurikhan77 Oh I get your point. Still, it's quite simple code. –  Philip Nov 3 '10 at 23:49

Use sort_by for these things, not sort!

array.sort_by {|h| [h[:accepts] ? 0 : 1,h[:id]]}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice. Slower (I suppose), but cool. –  Nakilon Nov 3 '10 at 22:33
    
@Nakilon, On my box and using MRI 1.8.7, glenn's code takes a bit less than half the time of your code. –  Wayne Conrad Nov 4 '10 at 0:32
    
I'm not saying there aren't cases where sort is faster than sort_by, but I've never encountered one myself. Usually sort_by is significantly faster. And even more importantly, writing a function that produces a unary sort-value is always cleaner and clearer than a bunch of binary comparison cases. Personally, I reserve sort for cases where I actually need to do different logic according to pair traits of the comparees. Like if I need to compare strings numerically if they are both numbers, or datewise if they're both dates, or stringwise otherwise... –  glenn mcdonald Nov 4 '10 at 2:12
    
OK, I take my words back ) –  Nakilon Nov 4 '10 at 11:27
array = [{:id => 1, :accepts => false}, 
         {:id => 2, :accepts => false}, 
         {:id => 3, :accepts => true}, 
         {:id => 4, :accepts => false}, 
         {:id => 5, :accepts => true}]

sorted = array.sort do |x, y|
  if x[:accepts] ^ y[:accepts]
      x[:accepts] ? -1 : 1
  else
      x[:id] <=> y[:id]
  end
end

puts sorted

Or != instead of ^, if you wish.

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3  
Cruel world... nobody knows <=>... –  Nakilon Nov 3 '10 at 20:56

You could add an extra check on the :id key if :accepts is equal, as follows:

array = [{:id => 1, :accepts => false}, 
    {:id => 2, :accepts => false}, 
    {:id => 3, :accepts => true}, 
    {:id => 4, :accepts => false}, 
    {:id => 5, :accepts => true}]

sorted = array.sort do |x, y|
  if x[:accepts] == y[:accepts]
    if x[:id] == y[:id]
      0
    elsif x[:id] > y[:id]
      1
    elsif x[:id] < y[:id]
      -1
    end
  elsif x[:accepts] == true
    -1
  elsif x[:accepts] == false
    1
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
This also works by the way. –  Nick Nov 3 '10 at 20:33

This is because sorting in Ruby 1.8.7 is not stable

All you need to do is have your sort block not return 0:

sorted = array.sort do |x, y|
  if x[:accepts] == y[:accepts]
    x[:id] <=> y[:id]  # not 0
  elsif x[:accepts]
    -1
  else
    1
  end
end

(no need to explicitly compare a boolean to true and false)

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Well, from your question I deduce you really wanted to group the results by the :accepts value and merge both result sets back into one array. My solution to this would've been:

array.select {|where| where[:accepts] } | array.reject {|where| where[:accepts] }
# => [{:accepts=>true, :id=>3},
#     {:accepts=>true, :id=>5},
#     {:accepts=>false, :id=>1},
#     {:accepts=>false, :id=>2},
#     {:accepts=>false, :id=>4}]

This will maintain original order without implying any sorts on the :id key. This means you won't need a helper key to preserve order, and you can preserve order on the result regardless of the transported data.

This may also be useful (and maybe exactly what you need for further evaluations):

array.group_by {|where| where[:accepts] }
# => {false=>[{:accepts=>false, :id=>1},
#             {:accepts=>false, :id=>2},
#             {:accepts=>false, :id=>4}],
#      true=>[{:accepts=>true, :id=>3},
#             {:accepts=>true, :id=>5}]}

Again, no artificial sorts involved... group_by is new in 1.8.7.

PS: If you don't want the first code snippet remove duplicates from your array, replace the bar operator with the plus operator. "|" merges two sets according to the theory of sets (union) while "+" concatenates two sets (the result is not really a set but a plain array).

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a.sort_by { |x| (x[:accepts] ? 0 : 99999) + x[:id] }

Update: Well, obviously this requires x[:id].respond_to? "+" and additionally there are restrictions on its range relative to the constants.

This is, however, the shortest and probably the fastest answer, if also obviously the most questionable.

The really important lesson is that it illustrates that one should look beyond Array (or whatever) and check Enumerable if that's in (your object).class.ancestors. These questions and their viewers are often after an answer to "what should I learn about Ruby next, I suspect there are other ways".

Regardless of whether this is a good way to sort (admittedly it's questionable) this answer suggests #sort_by and just finding the docs for #sort_by (it's not in Array) will teach a small but important lesson to a beginner.

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1  
That is this sort of very bad and dumb answers which just look smart. Not suitable for beginners seeking help for their first steps in a new language - especially in absence of any explanation. –  hurikhan77 Nov 3 '10 at 23:01
1  
In what substantive way is this downvoted answer different than @glenn mcdonald's upvoted answer? Both answers could do with an explanation, it's true, and glenn's is a little better, but this one isn't that bad. –  Wayne Conrad Nov 4 '10 at 0:25
2  
"Very bad and dumb" is not a very collaborative comment, but objectively speaking I think this one has three identifiable flaws that make it a less-than-ideal suggestion. Most obviously, it assumes that ids don't get higher than 99999. That could easily be wrong, now or later. Second, magic values like 99999 are, in general, enemies of clarity and comprehension, and thus of maintainability. And thirdly, this version uses addition, which is functionally irrelevant, and would break if the ids later turned into strings, or negative numbers or something else. –  glenn mcdonald Nov 4 '10 at 2:00
1  
Any of those things could be tolerated if this approach had compensating virtues, or if the alternatives had complicating constraints. But doing a two-item array instead of adding the two numbers is just plainly clearer. Does that make sense? (And just to be clear, I didn't downvote this, I'm just trying to explain.) –  glenn mcdonald Nov 4 '10 at 2:06
    
@glenn actually I wrote "sort of" but point taken. +1... And since explanation was added, voting changed –  hurikhan77 Nov 5 '10 at 4:23

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