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I'm trying to create a function that will replace 0's, 1's, or 2's with spaces in a string. I'm going about it by iterating through the string and comparing each individual character.

My function will work if I compare str_in[i] == '0', but if I add the or statement it returns nothing.

Snippet:

string omit_num( string ) {
    int i ;

    str_len = str_in.length();
    str_out = "" ; 

    for( i = 0 ; i < str_len ; i ++ ){
         cout << str_in[i] << endl; 
         if ( str_in[i] == '0' || '1' || '2') 
            app = " " ;
         else
             app = str_in[i];
         str_out.append(app) ; 
    }
    return str_out; 

}
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6  
wow, nine answers... and they all say the same thing. –  Alexander Rafferty Nov 3 '10 at 20:21
    
And your compiler should warn you about expressions that will always evaluate to true/false. –  Alexander Rafferty Nov 3 '10 at 20:22
    
(Apart from the error all the posts have told about) this snippet is obviously not the code you used, and will not compile on its own. –  eq- Nov 3 '10 at 20:48
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11 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You need

if ( str_in[i] == '0' ||  str_in[i] =='1' ||  str_in[i] =='2') 
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You will have to repeat the test each time, '1', '2' on their own are basically small ints and evaluate to true. It should look like the following:

if (str_in[i] == '0' || str_in[i] == '1' || str_in[i] == '2')
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The expression str_in[i] == '0' || '1' || '2' contains three separate expressions:

str_in[i] == '0'
'1'
'2'

According to any ASCII chart, '0' has a value of 48, '1' is 49, '2' is 50. So the last two expressions are always non-zero (and therefore always true).

You probably wanted str_in[i] == '0' || str_in[i] == '1' || str_in[i] == '2'

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if (str_in[i] == '0' || str_in[i] == '1' || str_in[i] == '2')

or alternatively

switch (str_in[i]) {
  case '0':
  case '1':
  case '2': app = " " ;
            break;
  default:  app = str_in[i];
}
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The switch statement seems more appropriate, to me ... –  Lee-Man Nov 3 '10 at 21:11
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Your if statement reads as follows: If the character at i is equal to '0', or '1' is true, or '2' is true. As '1' and '2' both evaluate to a non zero integer, it will always be true.

What you want is: str_in[i] == '0' || str_in[i] == '1' || str_in[i] == '2'

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'1' is '1' therefore '1' evaluates to true. You must make new, complete, statements with every operator.

try this:

if ( str_in[i] == '0' || str_in[i] == '1' || str_in[i] == '2' )

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2  
'1' is a char, and evaluates to true. However, '1' == true evaluates to false. –  eq- Nov 3 '10 at 20:45
    
You are correct my choice of wording was incorrect. I have corrected it. –  Harmon Wood Nov 3 '10 at 21:04
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Not sure about the logic overall, but the logic here specifically is wrong. Replace

if ( str_in[i] == '0' || '1' || '2') 

with

if ( str_in[i] == '0' || str_in[i] == '1' || str_in[i] == '2') 
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Change your if statement to:

if ( str_in[i] == '0' || str_in[i] == '1' || str_in[i] == '2') {
...
}
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string omit_num( string ) { 
int i ; 

str_len = str_in.length(); 
str_out = "" ;  

for( i = 0 ; i < str_len ; i ++ ){ 
     cout << str_in[i] << endl;  
     if ( str_in[i] == '0' || '1' || '2')  
        app = " " ; 
     else 
         app = str_in[i]; 
     str_out.append(app) ;  
} 
return str_out;  

}

this would work as the following:

string omit_num( string ) { 
int i ; 

str_len = str_in.length(); 
str_out = "" ;  

for( i = 0 ; i < str_len ; i ++ ){ 
     cout << str_in[i] << endl;  
     if ( (str_in[i] == '0') || (str_in[i] == '1') || (str_in[i] == '2'))  
        app = " " ; 
     else 
         app = str_in[i]; 
     str_out.append(app) ;  
} 
return str_out;  

}

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2  
I love it when programmers use parenthesis! Seriously. Why trust/look up precedence when you can make it clearly explicit? –  Lee-Man Nov 3 '10 at 21:12
    
This is the only way I like to do things and wished more programmers would... Obviously know its not necessary but still like to keep it understood... makes harder sequences much easier to debug later... –  g19fanatic Nov 3 '10 at 21:51
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You need to apply the equality operator in each || expression:

if (str_in[i] == '0' || str_in[i] == '1' || str_in[i] == '2')
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If you're using c++, use the standard library already:

std::replace_if( s.begin(), s.end(), [](char a){return a=='0'||a=='1'||a=='2';}, ' ');
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