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I am trying to learn c++ and I am running into problems with my if/else statements. I thought I had them down when I would nest them without opening and closing braces, but I tried with braces and I get errors.

Can someone point out what is wrong and how to fix it, not just the answer; that way I won't learn a thing.

here is my source:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
 signed long int RealNumber = 31710;
 int Guess;

 cout << "Lets see if you can guess my favorite number... \n";
 cout << "Type in a number and hit enter to see if you have guessed it correctly. \n";
 cout << "you should know this one Danielle. \n \n ";
 cin >> Guess;


 if (Guess == RealNumber)
 {
  cout << "Wow, you are amazing! \n";
  cout << "Would you like to be punched?";
 }
 else
 {
  if (Guess < RealNumber)
   cout << "The number is higher";
  else
   if (Guess > RealNumber)
    cout << "The number is lower";
   else
    cout << "That is impossible!"; //trying to make sure that if anthing but a number is entered that the program doesn't crash.
 }

}
 char f;  // used to make the program wait for input before closing. 
 cin >> f;

 return 0;
share|improve this question
2  
It would be useful that you post the compiler's output too. An obvious error here is the closing brace right before the declaration of "char f;". – Éric Malenfant Nov 3 '10 at 20:50

You have an extra brace just above the line that says-

char f; 
cin >> f; 

this closing brace matches your main function's initial brace.

The bracing structure you've used in the if/else nesting seems fine to me.

Here is a tip - for every opening brace, type the closing brace immediately, and add a comment to it. You don't have to use this 'crutch' forever, but as a beginner learning to write code, this coudl be very helpful.

Step 1:

int main()
{
}//main 

Step 2:

int main()
{
    int foo; 
    cin >> foo; 
    if (foo < 100)
    {
        //todo 
    }// if (foo < 100)
}//main

Step 3:

int main()
{
    int foo; 
    cin >> foo; 
    if (foo < 100)
    {
        cout << "foo is too small";
        cin >> foo; 
        if (foo < 100)
        {
            //todo 
        } // if (foo < 100), inner if statement 
    }// if (foo < 100)
}//main

etc.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the tip, I shall utilize that to prevent further simple errors and this could also be a great way to comment out my code as I go along. – Anthony Richards Nov 3 '10 at 20:59
    
And kotlinski's comment about indentation is also a great one. Indentation can often give an easy visual clues about mismatched braces. More importantly, it will keep you from introducing extra braces in the first place. – Vatsan Nov 3 '10 at 21:00
    
some editors (like Notepad++) will also highlight them. Very useful feature. – ruslik Nov 3 '10 at 21:07
5  
Those comments on closing braces clutter the code and tend to get out of sync very soon. – sbi Nov 3 '10 at 21:10
1  
sbi is right. those comments are like training-wheels. stop using them as soon as you feel comfortable. – Vatsan Nov 3 '10 at 21:33

It's a good idea to use a text editor with auto-indentation. That might help you avoid "simple" errors like this one.

share|improve this answer

Please look at David's answer. I would just like to also point out that normally, you would want to write your if-else code as follows:

 if (Guess == RealNumber)
 {
   cout << "Wow, you are amazing! \n";
   cout << "Would you like to be punched?";
 }
 else if (Guess < RealNumber)
 {
   cout << "The number is higher";
 }
 else if (Guess > RealNumber)
 {
   cout << "The number is lower";
 }
 else
 {
    cout << "That is impossible!";
 }

or

 if (Guess == RealNumber)
 {
   cout << "Wow, you are amazing! \n";
   cout << "Would you like to be punched?";
 }
 else if (Guess < RealNumber)
   cout << "The number is higher";
 else if (Guess > RealNumber)
   cout << "The number is lower";
 else
    cout << "That is impossible!";
share|improve this answer
    
Spot on. IMO nesting if/else obfuscates what is going on to the developer, reducing readability. In real life someone else is eventually going to be maintaining your code. – kmarks2 Nov 3 '10 at 21:01

Try this

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
 signed long int RealNumber = 31710;
 int Guess;

 cout << "Lets see if you can guess my favorite number... \n";
 cout << "Type in a number and hit enter to see if you have guessed it correctly. \n";
 cout << "you should know this one Danielle. \n \n ";
 std::cin >> Guess;


 if (Guess == RealNumber)
 {
  cout << "Wow, you are amazing! \n";
  cout << "Would you like to be punched?";
 }
 else
 {
  if (Guess < RealNumber)
   cout << "The number is higher";
  else
   if (Guess > RealNumber)
    cout << "The number is lower";
   else
    cout << "That is impossible!"; //trying to make sure that if anthing but a number is entered that the program doesn't crash.
 }

 char f;  // used to make the program wait for input before closing. 
 std::cin >> f;

 return 0;
} // <-- this bracket was misplaced

Your main() bracket was misplaced.

share|improve this answer
    
So I nested the if and else functions (what are the properly called) correctly? And how would I make it so that if I enter anything but a number it can output text saying to chose a number? – Anthony Richards Nov 3 '10 at 20:54
1  
That's a different answer for a different question :) But just so you know, it's generally considered bad practice to NOT use brackets around if-then-else statements. Readability is key. – David Titarenco Nov 3 '10 at 21:01

You should use {} with you have chains of if-else. The compiler doesn't see how you indented the if-else (starting with "The number is higher") and it sees it as one flat if-elseif-else. However, I don't see that it's causing you a problem in this particular case.

share|improve this answer

Try to count the opening and closing braces.

share|improve this answer

Remove the #include <stdafx.h> (and if this is a Visual Studio project, turn off "precompiled headers" in the project settings).

Move the statements that you've placed after the ending } brace of main, before that brace.

You can't have non-declaration statements outside a function.

Cheers & hth.

share|improve this answer
    
@anonymous downvoter: explain yourself. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Aug 7 '14 at 18:44

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