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Following up on a comment on another I question I asked myself if there's a way to get a list of all js code that is loaded on a page. Something like what firebug or chrome inspector do.

Is there a pure javascript way for that?

One way would be to scrape for script tags, but then you could miss dynamically loaded js. I'd hope for an API.

In the case of the other question, one could grep all the scripts for calls to console.debug() to prevent forgetting them and letting them slip into production.

Thanks

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It certainly is a pure javascript way to do that; think of firebug lite. –  Gabi Purcaru Nov 3 '10 at 20:52
    
In my early days in JavaScript I've done something crazy. I wrote code that iterated over all possible names and looked for valid objects/functions. As last resort this might partially answer your need, finding at least part of the "loaded" functions and/or objects.. let me know if you want and I'll dig it up. –  Shadow Wizard Nov 3 '10 at 23:00

3 Answers 3

I can't think of something that doesn't require a lot of work. Here's my initial failed attempt. It gets into infinite recursion as it tries to iterate through all the inner properties of window.

/**
 * You have to run this in firefox, pass window the first time
 * @return boolean Whether the given object contains a function where its
 * source code contains the word console.
 */ 
function lookForConsole( obj ) {
  var found  = false;
  for (var prop in obj) {
    var current = obj[prop];
    if (typeof current == "function") {

      if (current.toSource.indexOf("console" + ".log") != -1) {
        found = true;
        break;
      }
    } else if (typeof current == "object"){
      found = lookForConsole(current);
      if (found) {
        break;
      }
    }
  }
  return found;
}

You ever hear the expression, "when the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail"?

Why would you do this in JS?

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1  
Nice approach. I was just interested to know if there's any easy approach on this. –  balu Nov 4 '10 at 18:08
    
I think you are wasting your time! –  Juan Mendes Nov 4 '10 at 18:30
    
Yup, looks like I do. –  balu Nov 5 '10 at 13:52

using jQuery:

$(document).ready(function() {


$('script').each(function() {
    if($(this).attr('src')) {
        alert($(this).attr('src'))
    }
    else {
        alert("inline")
    }
})

});

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Not exactly what I'm looking for. That's what I already proposed in my question. –  balu Nov 3 '10 at 21:06

This is how firebug does it. I guess there's no fancier way then.

    var doc = Firebug.browser.document;
    var scripts = doc.getElementsByTagName("script");
    var selectNode = this.selectNode = createElement("select");

    for(var i=0, script; script=scripts[i]; i++)
    {
        // Don't show Firebug Lite source code in the list of options
        if (Firebug.ignoreFirebugElements && script.getAttribute("firebugIgnore"))
            continue;

        var fileName = getFileName(script.src) || getFileName(doc.location.href);
        var option = createElement("option", {value:i});

        option.appendChild(Firebug.chrome.document.createTextNode(fileName));
        selectNode.appendChild(option);
    };

http://fbug.googlecode.com/svn/lite/branches/firebug1.3/content/firebug/script.js

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Unfortunately, your code doesn't run with the same permission as firebug. You can create a plugin to do it though... –  Juan Mendes Nov 5 '10 at 20:07

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