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If I create an application, using Shoes, would I have to license it under a open source license, or can I use it for closed-source/propietary stuff? The framework consists of a lot of moving parts, so it's not entirely clear to me.

EDIT: The reason why I'm asking, is because of the notes at this page:

Since both anal_pe and XPwn are GPL, I’m afraid this extension must be GPL as well. The rest of Shoes is MIT. Which is okay I guess since the packager isn’t really needed to run Shoes apps.

I assume that it doesn't affect the final product that the packager is GPL'ed, but I just wanted an opinion about that, other than my own guesswork.

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closed as off-topic by Kevin Brown, cpburnz, greg-449, EdChum, apomene Jun 16 at 8:55

  • This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is about licensing or legal issues, not programming or software development. See here for details, and the help center for more. –  Kevin Brown Jun 15 at 23:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Shoes is distributed under an MIT license:

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person
obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation
files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction,
including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge,
publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software,
and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so,
subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be 
included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF
ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED
TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT
SHALL THE AUTHORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR
OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT
OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION
WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE
SOFTWARE.

You should be able to use pretty much any license, even a closed source/proprietary license.

You're not linking against the packager, merely using it, so your app shouldn't fall under the requirements of the GPL.

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Thanks - The reason I'm asking, is because the packager uses some GPL'ed code. –  troelskn Jan 3 '09 at 19:55
    
You're not linking against the packager, so you shouldn't be bound by the requirements of the GPL. I edited my reply to take this facet into account. –  mipadi Jan 4 '09 at 15:09
    
Makes sense .. Thanks –  troelskn Jan 4 '09 at 23:17

As mipadi noted, MIT license means you don't owe anything to anyone, so you can release your applications under any license you want.

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