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I have the following code:

        def countdown():
            def countdown1():
                print 'countdown1'
                def countdown2():
                    def countdown3():
                        takePic()
                    self.pic.set_markup("<span size='54000'>1</span>");
                    print 1
                    t3 = Timer(1.0, countdown3)
                    t3.start()
                self.pic.set_markup("<span size='54000'>2</span>");
                print 2
                t2 = Timer(1.0, countdown2)
                t2.start()
            self.pic.set_markup("<span size='54000'>3</span>");
            print 3
            t1 = Timer(1.0, countdown1)
            t1.start()

        countdown()

It should show a countdown from 3. The number 3 appears, but afterwards nothing happens. help?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why not just .join() your timer threads after you .start() them, so that the rest of your code waits until the timers are done to continue?

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1  
This was the easiest solution and, being lazy, I marked this as correct. Thanks to everyone else for their solutions! –  Joel Auterson Nov 3 '10 at 22:31

Your main thread is probably exiting before any timers fire. The simplest and crudest way to fix this is to get the main thread to sleep for as long as necessary. A saner option is to signal something like a semaphore at the end of countdown3 and wait on it in the main thread.

A more elegant solution, which can be integrated with a broader scheduling and asynchrony framework, is to invert the flow of control using generators:

def countdown():
    self.pic.set_markup("<span size='54000'>3</span>");
    print 3
    yield 1.0

    print 'countdown1'
    self.pic.set_markup("<span size='54000'>2</span>");
    print 2
    yield 1.0

    self.pic.set_markup("<span size='54000'>1</span>");
    print 1
    yield 1.0

    takePic()

for t in countdown():
    time.sleep(t)
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How long is necessary? And how exactly would I go about using semaphores? Thanks for the quick reply! –  Joel Auterson Nov 3 '10 at 22:06
1  
Sorry, I don't do spoon-feeding. Go off and read about Semaphores, try to use them, then come back and ask questions when you get stuck. –  Marcelo Cantos Nov 3 '10 at 22:11
1  
Will do. Thank you. –  Joel Auterson Nov 3 '10 at 22:12

Are you sure some other command isn't blocking? Like set_markup? A simplified example works for me:

>>> from threading import Timer
>>> def lvl1():
    def lvl2():
        print "evaling lvl2"
        def lvl3():
            print "evaling lvl3"
            print "TakePic()"
        print 1
        t3 = Timer(1.0, lvl3)
        t3.start()
    print 2
    t2 = Timer(2.0, lvl2)
    t2.start()

>>> lvl1()
2
>>> evaling lvl2
1
evaling lvl3
TakePic()
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Will try replacing with prints, just to see. –  Joel Auterson Nov 3 '10 at 22:10
    
Nope. I doubt it's the set_markup anyway, but getting rid of it doesn't solve the issue. –  Joel Auterson Nov 3 '10 at 22:11

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