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How can I generate an array in Perl with 100 random values, without using a loop?

I have to avoid all kind of loops, like "for", foreach", while. This is my exercise, from my lab. I can't find a way to do solve this, because I am new in Perl.

In C, generating this array would by very easy, but I don't know how to do it in Perl.

share|improve this question
2  
Why would you want to avoid a loop? –  Oliver Charlesworth Nov 3 '10 at 22:49
19  
Please mark problems related to school assignments with the homework tag. –  mob Nov 3 '10 at 22:59
6  
How would you do it in C? –  Martin Broadhurst Nov 3 '10 at 23:00
2  
You can do it with recursion in C, and Perl. –  Martin Broadhurst Nov 3 '10 at 23:16
2  
@ysth: it's educative insofar as if the student ever manages to understand all of our helpful solutions, they'll learn quite a bit more than their instructor had counted on them learning from it. –  tchrist Nov 4 '10 at 6:36

23 Answers 23

up vote 27 down vote accepted
my @rand = map { rand } ( 1..100 );

But a map is just a loop with fancy window-dressing.

If you need to do something 100 times, you're going to need to use some kind of iterative structure.

share|improve this answer
5  
Well... a "map is just a loop" seems to be a VERY debatable statement... literally. stackoverflow.com/questions/3019925/is-map-a-loop .I happen to agree with labelling it a lop, FWIW –  DVK Nov 3 '10 at 23:17
1  
I wouldn't call map "just a loop". It's main feature it that it's an expression, so it can be part of a statement. The other looping constructs require their own statements (even in the modifier form). –  brian d foy Nov 4 '10 at 16:22
    
Or a recursive structure. –  ripper234 Nov 9 '10 at 6:39
4  
Recursion is the same as iteration. –  friedo Nov 9 '10 at 18:35

For amusement value:

A possibly nondeterministic method that does not use for, while, until:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict; use warnings;

my @rand;

NOTLOOP:
push @rand, rand;
sleep 1;
goto NOTLOOP if 100 > time - $^T;

print 0 + @rand, "\n";

Using regular expressions:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict; use warnings;

my $s = '-' x 100;
$s =~ s/(-)/rand() . $1/eg;
my @rand = $s=~ m/([^-]+)/g;

Copying and pasting 100 rand invocations by hand is really passé:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict; use warnings;

my $s = '(' . 'rand,' x 100 . ')';
my @rand = eval $s;

A file I/O based solution that does not require /dev/random:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict; use warnings;

$/ = \1;

my @rand;

seek \*DATA, 0, 0;

NOTLOOP:
scalar <DATA>;
push @rand, rand;
goto NOTLOOP if $. < 100;
__DATA__

No reason to use recursion with Perl's goto

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict; use warnings;
use autodie;

$/ = \1;

open my $F, '<', \( 1 x 100 . 0 );

my @rand or &notloop;

sub notloop {
    my $t = <$F>;
    $t or return;
    push @rand, rand;
    goto \&notloop;
}

Here is a recursive string eval version:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict; use warnings; use autodie;

local $/ = \1;
open my $F, '<', \( 1 x 100 . 0 );

my @rand;

eval <<'NOLOOP'
my $self = (caller(0))[6];
<$F> or die;
push @rand, rand;
eval $self;
NOLOOP
;

Of course, all of these actually do contain loops, but they do not use the keywords you were barred from using.

NB: This question has brought out the wacko in me, but I must admit it is amusing.

share|improve this answer
3  
FOR THE WIN!!!! –  DVK Nov 3 '10 at 23:20
    
I dunno. The tail recursion would have been cooler if it had been an anon sub{}. :) –  tchrist Nov 4 '10 at 0:24
    
I'm waiting for something spooky to happen to *CORE::GLOBAL::rand. –  tchrist Nov 4 '10 at 0:24
    
@tchrist I believe I need Sub::Current for the anon sub solution. However, I added one based on recursive string eval. –  Sinan Ünür Nov 4 '10 at 1:02
    
Oh, I dunno about that: see my anon sub solution. :) –  tchrist Nov 4 '10 at 1:04

Nothing could be simpler!

my @rands = (rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand,
  rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand,
  rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand,
  rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand,
  rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand,
  rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand,
  rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand,
  rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand,
  rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand, rand,
  rand, rand);
share|improve this answer
10  
+1. A valid solution to an inane problem –  friedo Nov 3 '10 at 22:56
19  
Wow. That is so noisy. Clearly my @rands = eval sprintf q[(%s)], join q[,] => ('rand') x 100; is much more maintainable. –  rafl Nov 3 '10 at 23:02
6  
+1 But didn't you have a loop in your brain while typing? ;) –  Peter G. Nov 3 '10 at 23:10
2  
Obligatory: search.dilbert.com/comic/Random%20Nine –  Ether Nov 3 '10 at 23:23
3  
Copying and pasting 100 rand s by hand is so not Perl! ;-) –  Sinan Ünür Nov 3 '10 at 23:26

Pure Regex Solution

perl -E'say for&{sub{"\U\x{fb01}\x{fb03}"=~/.{0,2}.{0,3}.{0,3}.{0,4}+(?{$_[++$#_]=rand})(*FAIL)/||pop;@_}}'

Double‐/e Regex Solution

This:

($_=(120.44.32)x(2+2*2**2)**2)=~s/\170/114.97.110.100/gee;
s/(.*)/64.95.61.40.$1.41.35.89.65.78.69.84.85.84/ee;
print "@_\n";

looplessly produces this:

0.636939813223766 0.349175195300148 0.692949079946754 0.230945990743699 0.61873698433654 0.940179094890468 0.435165707624346 0.721205126535175 0.0322560847184015 0.91310500801842 0.31596325316222 0.788125484008084 0.802964232426337 0.417745170032291 0.155032810595454 0.146835982654117 0.181850358582611 0.932543988687968 0.143043972615896 0.415793094159206 0.576503681784647 0.996621492832261 0.382576007897708 0.090130958455255 0.39637315568709 0.928066985272665 0.190092542303415 0.518855656633185 0.797714758118492 0.130660731025571 0.534763929837762 0.136503767441518 0.346381958112605 0.391661401050982 0.498108766062398 0.478789295276393 0.882380841033143 0.852353540653993 0.90519922056134 0.197466335156797 0.820753004050889 0.732284103461893 0.738124358455405 0.250301496672911 0.88874926709342 0.0647566487704268 0.733226696403218 0.186469206795884 0.837423290530243 0.578047704593843 0.776140208497122 0.375268613243982 0.0128391627800006 0.872438613450569 0.636808174464274 0.676851978312946 0.192308731231467 0.401619465269903 0.977516959116411 0.358315250197542 0.726835710856381 0.688046044314845 0.870742340556202 0.58832098735666 0.552752229159754 0.170767637182252 0.683588677743852 0.0603160539059857 0.892022266162105 0.10206962926371 0.728253338154527 0.800910562860132 0.628613236438159 0.742591620029089 0.602839705915397 0.00926448179027517 0.182584549347883 0.53561587562946 0.416667072500555 0.479173194613729 0.78711818598828 0.017823873107119 0.824805088282755 0.302367196288522 0.0677539595682397 0.509467036447674 0.906839536492864 0.804383046648944 0.716848992363769 0.450693083312729 0.786925293921154 0.078886787987166 0.417139859647296 0.9574382550514 0.581196777508975 0.75882630076142 0.391754631502298 0.370189654004974 0.80290625532508 0.38016959549288

Recursive Numeric Function Solution

As in fact, does this, if you print the array:

@_=(*100=sub{$_[0]?(rand,(*{--$_[0]}=*{$_[0]})->(@_)):()})->($==100);

The second solution now allows for getting different numbers of random numbers easily enough, since following the assignment above, you can do such niceties as:

 print for @42=42->($==42);

And yes, that is indeed a function named 42(). The previous assignment to @_ created it along with a hundred other numerically named functions.


Explanation

The first regex solution relies on Unicode’s tricky casing of the two characters matched against. It may (or may not) be more easily understood with whitespace and comments added:

use 5.010;

say for &{

    sub  { "\U\x{fb01}\x{fb03}" =~ m((?mix-poop)

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <regex.h>
#include "perl.h"
#include "utf8.h"

#ifndef BROKEN_UNICODE_CHARCLASS_MAPPINGS

                        .{0,2}

                .{0,3}          .{0,3}

                        .{0,4}

#define rand() (random()<<UTF_ACCUMULATION_SHIFT^random()&UTF_CONTINUATION_MASK)
       +(?{ $_  [++$#_] = rand() || rand() || UTF8_TWO_BYTE_LO (*PERL_UNICODE)
#else                                                          (*PRUNE)
#define FAIL                                                   (*ACCEPT)
          })                                                   (*FAIL)
#endif                                                         (*COMMIT)
    )poop || pop                                            @{ (*_{ARRAY})     }
    ;#;                                                     @{ (*SKIP:REGEX)   }
                                                            @{ (*_{ARRAY})     }
    }
}

The way to understand how the second regex solution works is:

  • First, reduce the compile-time constant expressions into their more customary forms so you can more easily read the literals. For example, \170 is "x".
  • Second, trim down the double e to a single e in each substitution, then print out what that leaves in the string both times.

I’m sure you’ll appreciate the comment. :)


For the recursive solution, adding whitespace may help a little:

(*100 = sub { $_[0]
                ? ( rand, ( *{ --$_[0] } = *{ $_[0] } )->(@_) )
                : ( )
            }
)->( $= = 100 );

The need to pass a variable as an argument is due to the auto-decrement requiring an lvalue. I did that because I didn’t want to have to say $_[0] - 1 twice, or have any named temporary variables. It means you can do this:

$N = 100;
print for $N->($N);

And when you’re done, $N == 0, because of pass‐by‐implicit‐reference semantics.

For the cost of a bit of repetition, you can relax the need of an lvalue argument.

(*100 = sub { $_[0]
                 ? ( rand, ( *{ $_[0] - 1 } = *{ $_[0] } )->( $_[0] - 1 ) )
                 : ( )
            }
)->( 100 );

Now you no longer need an lvalue argument, so you can write:

print for 100->(100);

to get all 100 random numbers. Of course, you also have a hundred other numeric functions, too, so you can get lists of random numbers in any of these ways:

@vi = 6->(6); 
@vi = &6( 6);

$dozen = 12;

@dozen         =  $dozen->($dozen);
@baker's_dozen = &$dozen(++$dozen);

@_ = 100;
print &0;  # still a hundred of 'em

(Sorry ’bout the silly colors. Must be an SO bug.)

I trust that clears everything up. ☺

share|improve this answer
4  
Am I really the only one to include an informative comment in my solution to help out our hapless student? :) –  tchrist Nov 4 '10 at 0:33
4  
You win the line noise award of the month/year :) Too bad I can't upvote twice :) –  DVK Nov 4 '10 at 2:00
    
Why are there two e modifiers? What does it achieve? –  Zaid Nov 4 '10 at 6:04
2  
@Zaid: That one's the easier to understand of my two solutions. But to answer your question, the second e does the same thing as the first e. Kinda. –  tchrist Nov 4 '10 at 6:41
# I rolled a die, honestly!
my @random = (5, 2, 1, 3, 4, 3, 3, 4, 1, 6,
              3, 2, 4, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 4, 1,
              3, 6, 4, 6, 2, 6, 6, 1, 4, 5,
              1, 1, 5, 6, 6, 5, 1, 4, 1, 2,
              3, 1, 2, 2, 6, 6, 6, 5, 3, 3,
              6, 3, 4, 3, 1, 2, 1, 2, 3, 3,
              3, 4, 4, 1, 5, 5, 5, 1, 1, 5,
              6, 3, 2, 2, 1, 1, 5, 2, 5, 3,
              3, 3, 5, 5, 1, 6, 5, 6, 3, 2,
              6, 3, 5, 6, 1, 4, 3, 5, 1, 2);
share|improve this answer

Too bad most of the solutions focused on the non-looping part and neglected the random numbers part:

use LWP::Simple;

my @numbers = split /\s+/, #/ Stackoverflow syntax highlighting bug 
    get( 'http://www.random.org/integers/?num=100&min=1&max=100&col=1&base=10&format=plain&rnd=new' );

Here's the insanity that Tom was waiting to see, but I make it slightly more insane. This solution reduces the problem to:

my @numbers = rand( undef, 100 ); # fetch 100 numbers

Normal rand normally takes 0 or 1 arguments. I've given it a new prototype that allows a second argument to note how many numbers to return.

Notice some differences to the real rand though. This isn't continuous, so this has far fewer available numbers, and it's inclusive on the upper bound. Also, since this one takes two arguments, it's not compatible with programs expecting the real one since a statement like this would parse differently in each:

 my @array = rand 5, 5;

However, there's nothing particularly special about CORE::GLOBAL::rand() here. You don't have to replace the built-in. It's just a bit sick that you can.

I've left some print statements in there so you can watch it work:

BEGIN {
    my @buffer;

    my $add_to_buffer = sub {
        my $fetch = shift;
        $fetch ||= 100;
        $fetch = 100 if $fetch < 100;
        require LWP::Simple;
        push @buffer, split /\s+/, #/ Stackoverflow syntax highlighting bug
          LWP::Simple::get(
            "http://www.random.org/integers/?num=$fetch&min=1&max=100&col=1&base=10&format=plain&rnd=new"
            );
        };

    my $many = sub ($) {
        print "Fetching $_[0] numbers\n";
        $add_to_buffer->($_[0]) if @buffer < $_[0];
        my @fetched = splice @buffer, 0, $_[0], ();
        my $count = @fetched;
        print "Fetched [$count] @fetched\n";
        @fetched
        };

    *CORE::GLOBAL::rand = sub (;$$) {
        my $max = $_[0] || 1; # even 0 is 1, just like in the real one
        my $fetch = $_[1] || ( wantarray ? 10 : 1 );
        my @fetched = map { $max * $_ / 100 } $many->( $fetch );
        wantarray ? @fetched : $fetched[-1];
        };
    }

my @rand = rand(undef, 5);
print "Numbers are @rand\n\n";

@rand = rand(87);
print "Numbers are @rand\n\n";

$rand = rand(undef, 4);
print "Numbers are $rand\n\n";

$rand = rand();
print "Numbers are $rand\n\n";

$rand = rand(undef, 200);
print "Numbers are $rand\n\n";

My source of random numbers isn't important for this technique though. You could read from /dev/random or /dev/urandom to fill the buffer if you like.

share|improve this answer
    
That is a good solution. –  dawg Nov 4 '10 at 4:50
3  
Now I know the spooky thing that's going to happen to *CORE::GLOBAL::rand. –  tchrist Nov 4 '10 at 6:46
    
Thanks. Can’t upvote you again, though. :( At first I thought you could have used &$add_to_buffer if @buffer < $_[0] but I see now that that doesn’t always work quite right. –  tchrist Nov 4 '10 at 17:20
1  
Nice! Will this implementation make it into Perl 5.14 or 5.16? –  Christopher Bottoms Nov 9 '10 at 0:21
1  
Why would any implementation be in Perl? It should be a module anyway. No one will agree on their method to get random numbers. –  brian d foy Nov 12 '10 at 18:51
sub f {
    my $n = shift;
    if( $n == 0 ) {
        return @_;
    }
    else {
        return f( $n-1, rand, @_ );
    }
}

my @random_array = f(100);
share|improve this answer
    
Dammit. You had to post a recursive solution after my answer :-) –  user166390 Nov 3 '10 at 23:12
    
I saw it blinking but read it only afterwards, a pity to delete it then. I tested it before posting otherwise I would have been earlier. –  Peter G. Nov 3 '10 at 23:17

map is used here as a topicalizer over a single value, exempting it from loop status:

my @rand = map&$_($_),sub{@_<=100&&goto&{push@_,rand;$_[0]};shift;@_};

or with two subs:

my @rand = sub{&{$_[0]}}->(sub{@_<=100&&goto&{(@_=(rand,@_))[-1]};pop;@_});

both of these are Y-combinator style self-passed subs that build up the list via iteration but one is clearly faster than the other.

you can fix the inefficiency with s'g[^}]+'goto&{unshift@_,rand;$_[-1]' but then its getting a bit long.

or to sidestep the call stack:

my @rand = do{local*_=sub{(push@_,rand)<100?goto&_:@_};&_};

or with eval, no variable assignment, no external state, one anon sub:

my @rand = eval'sub{@_<100?eval((caller 1)[6]):@_}->(@_,rand)';

but most concise of all is:

my @rand = map&$_,sub{(100^push@_,rand)?goto&$_:@_};
share|improve this answer
1  
Eric, I think you win the code-golf award. –  tchrist Nov 6 '10 at 1:29

While the copy'n'paste examples are novel and the map/foreach alternatives have also been mentioned, I think one approach that has not been discussed is recursion. Using recursion (an implicit loop) would need method calls and a simple 'if' statement: no for/grep/map/etc. It could be side-effecting or side-effect free.

Since this is homework, I will leave the implementation to the poster.

Happy coding.

BTW: Nobody has posted a regular expression solution yet ;-)

It's nice to see some even more innovative solutions! :-)

share|improve this answer
1  
Plus one for NOT doing the posters homework for him. –  philosodad Nov 5 '10 at 15:03

Using an anonymous sub and recursion:

use strict;
use warnings;

my @foo;
my $random;
($random = sub {
        push @{$_[0]}, rand;
        return if @{$_[0]} == $_[1];
        goto \&$random;
})->(\@foo, 100);

print "@foo\n";
print scalar @foo, "\n";

Using computed goto, for all the fortran fans:

use strict;
use warnings;

sub randoms {
        my $num = shift;
        my $foo;
        CARRYON:
                push @$foo, rand;
                # goto $#{$foo} < 99 ? 'CARRYON' : 'STOP';
                goto ( ('CARRYON') x 99, 'STOP' )[$#$foo];
        STOP:
                return @$foo;
}

my @foo = randoms(100);
print "@foo\n";
print scalar(@foo)."\n";

2 anonymous subs and an arrayref:

use strict;
use warnings;

my @bar = sub {  return &{$_[0]} }->
(
        sub {
                push @{$_[1]}, rand;
                goto \&{$_[0]}
                        unless scalar(@{$_[1]}) == $_[2];
                return @{$_[1]};
        },
        [],
        100
);

print "@bar\n";
print scalar(@bar), "\n";
share|improve this answer
1  
It's trivial if you keep a reference to it in a variable. What I wanted to do was to find a way to do everything in a solitary sub { } without storing the ref in a variable. –  Sinan Ünür Nov 4 '10 at 1:28
    
Devel::Caller / callee seemed a bit much for the OP's question –  MkV Nov 4 '10 at 13:14
1  
@Sinan: bless the closure and invoke it against itself as a method. –  tchrist Nov 4 '10 at 14:23
1  
That x99 token doesn’t look right: it needs to be two tokens. Also, $#{$foo} can always be rewritten as $#$foo due to the rule that dereferencing braces can be omitted whenever they contain nothing but a bareword symbol with zero or more leading dollar signs. I do like the double-closure solution. –  tchrist Nov 4 '10 at 15:22
1  
The world would be a better place if more Perl hackers knew about the Y combinator. –  Porculus Nov 6 '10 at 17:11
!#/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $x = 99;
my @rands = (rand,(*x=sub{rand,(map{*x->($x,sub{*x})}($x)x!!--$x)})->($x,*x));

use feature 'say';
say for @rands;
share|improve this answer
    
Nice work! It’s always nice to see people play with their symbol tables. Been a while since I’ve had to explain perl4’s pass-by-name semantics using *x parameters to anybody. Ah, but I see you’ve used a lexical $x, which sidesteps that issue. –  tchrist Nov 5 '10 at 3:39
    
Thanks Tom, I originally used positional parameters before realising I could keep the recursion count in a lexical and add another meaning for 'x' to the script. Wish I could have removed the map (even if it is just a glorified 'if')... –  Daniel Holz Nov 5 '10 at 11:07

Since the task seems to be either to get you to use recursion or to learn how to write an easy loop in a not-so-easy form, humbly I submit the following FULLY EXECUTABLE Perl programs:

Camel:

#!/usr/bin/perl
                                      ''=~('('.'?'
           .'{'.(                   '`'|'%').("\["^
        '-').('`'|                '!').('`'|',').'"'
 .'\\'.'$'.  ("\`"|              ',').('`'|')').('`'|
'-').'='.('^'^("\`"|            '/')).('^'^('`'|'.')).
('^'^('`'|'.')).';'.(          '!'^'+').('`'|'&').('`'
  |'/').('['^')').'('        .'\\'.'$'.'='.'='.(('^')^(
       '`'|'/')).';'.      '\\'.'$'.'='.'<'.'='.'\\'.'$'
      .('`'|(',')).(     '`'|')').('`'|'-').';'.'+'."\+".
     '\\'.'$'.('=').   ')'.'\\'.'{'.('['^'+').('['^"\.").(
    '['^'(').("\`"|   '(').('{'^'[').'\\'.'@'.'='.','.("\{"^
    '[').('['^')').  ('`'|'!').('`'|'.').('`'|'$').'\\'.'}'.(
    '!'^'+').'\\'.  '$'.'='.'='.('^'^('`'|'/')).';'.('!'^'+')
    .('`'|('&')).(  '`'|'/').('['^')').('{'^'[').'('.'\\'.'@'.
    '='.')'.('{'^'[').'\\'.'{'.('!'^'+').('*'^'#').('['^'+').(
    '['^')').('`'|')').('`'|'.').('['^'/').('{'^'[').'\\'.'"'.(
     '['^')').('`'|'!').('`'|'.').('`'|'$').('{'^'[').'\\'.'$'.
     '='.('{'^'[').('`'|'/').('`'|'&').('{'^'[').'\\'.'$'.("\`"|
      ',').('`'|')').('`'|'-').'='.'\\'.'$'.'_'.'\\'.'\\'.(('`')|
       '.').'\\'.'"'.';'.('!'^'+').('*'^'#').'\\'.'$'.'='.'+'.'+'
        .';'.('!'^'+').('*'^'#').'\\'.'}'.'"'.'}'.')');$:='.' ^((
         '~'));$~='@'|'(';$^=')'^'[';$/='`'|'.';$,='('^"\}";  $\=
          '`'|'!';$:=')'^'}';$~='*'|'`';$^='+'^'_'; $/="\&"|  '@'
            ;$,='['&'~';$\=','^'|';$:='.'^"\~";$~=  '@'|'('   ;$^
             =')'^ '[';$/='`'|'.';$,='('^"\}";$\=   '`'|'!'   ;$:
                   =')'^'}';$~='*'|'`';$^=('+')^    '_';$/=   '&'
                   |'@';$,=    '['&'~';$\ ="\,"^     '|';$:   =(
                   ('.'))^     "\~";$~=   ('@')|     '(';$^  =(
                   (')'))^     "\[";$/=   "\`"|       "\.";  (
                   ($,))=      '('^'}';   ($\)         ='`'
                   |"\!";     $:=(')')^   '}';         ($~)
                    ='*'|     "\`";$^=    '+'^         '_';
                    ($/)=     '&'|'@'     ;$,=         '['&
                    '~';     $\=','       ^'|'         ;$:=
                    '.'^     '~'          ;$~=         '@'|
                    '(';      $^=         ')'          ^((
                    '['        ));       $/=           '`'
                    |((         '.'     ));            $,=
                    '('          ^((   '}'              ))
                    ;(             ($\))=               ((
                    ((              '`'))               ))
                    |+             "\!";$:=             ((
                   ')'            ))^+ "\}";            $~
                  =((           '*'))|  '`';           $^=
                 '+'^         "\_";$/=   '&'          |'@'
               ;($,)=                                ('[')&
             "\~";$\=                               ','^'|'

Martini:

#!/usr/bin/perl
                                                  ''=~('(?{'.
                                                  ('`'|'%').(
                                                  '['^"\-").(
                                                  '`'|"\!").(
                                                  '`'|(',')).
                                                  '"\\$'.('`'
                                                    |',').(
                                                    '`'|')'
                                                    ).('`'|
                                                    ('-')).
                                                    ('=').(
                                                   '^'^('`'|
                                                   ('/'))).(
                                                   '^'^('`'|
                                                   ('.'))).(
                                                  '^'^(('`')|
                                                  '.')).';'.(
                                                 '!'^'+').('`'
                                                 |'&').(('`')|
                                                '/').('['^')').
                                                '(\\$=='.('^'^(
                                               '`'|'/')).';\\$='
                                              .'<=\\$'.('`'|',').
                                             ('`'|')').('`'|"\-").
                                            ';++\\$=)\\{'.('['^'+')
                                           .('['^'.').('['^'(').('`'
                                          |'(').('{'^'[').'\\@'.('`'|
                                          '!').('['^')').('['^"\)").(
                                          '`'|'!').('['^'"').','.('{'
                                          ^'[').('['^')').('`'|'!').(
                                          '`'|'.').('`'|"\$").'\\}'.(
'!'^'+').'\\$'.('`'|')').'='.("\^"^(      '`'|'/')).';'.('!'^('+')).(
 '`'|'&').('`'|'/').('['^')').('{'^       '[').'(\\@'.('`'|'!').('['^
   ')').('['^')').('`'|'!').('['^         '"').')'.('{'^"\[").'\\{'.(
    '!'^'+').('*'^'#').('['^'+')          .('['^')').('`'|')').("\`"|
      '.').('['^'/').('{'^'[')            .'\\"'.('['^')').('`'|'!').
       ('`'|'.').('`'|"\$").(             '{'^'[').'\\$'.('`'|"\)").(
         '{'^'[').('`'|'/')               .('`'|'&').('{'^'[').'\\$'.
          ('`'|',').("\`"|                ')').('`'|'-').'=\\$_\\\\'.
            ('`'|('.')).                  '\\";'.('!'^'+').('*'^'#').
             '\\$'.('`'                   |')').'++;'.('!'^'+').('*'^
               "\#").                     '\\}"})');$:='.'^'~';$~='@'
                |'('                      ;$^=')'^'[';$/='`'|"\.";$,=
                '('^                      '}';$\='`'|'!';$:=')'^"\}";
                ($~)                      ='*'|'`';$^='+'^'_';$/='&'|
                '@';                      $,='['&'~';$\=','^('|');$:=
                '.'^                      '~';$~='@'|'(';$^=')'^"\[";
                ($/)                      ='`'|'.';$,='('^'}';$\='`'|
                '!';                      $:=')'^'}';$~='*'|('`');$^=
                '+'^                      '_';$/='&'|'@';$,='['&"\~";
                ($\)                      =','^'|';$:='.'^'~';$~='@'|
                '(';                      $^=')'^'[';$/='`'|('.');$,=
                '('^                      '}';$\='`'|'!';$:=')'^"\}";
                ($~)                      ='*'|'`';$^='+'^'_';$/='&'|
'@';$,='['&'~';$\=','^'|';$:='.'^'~'      ;$~='@'|'(';$^=')'^"\[";$/=
'`'|'.';$,='('^'}';$\='`'|'!';$:=')'      ^'}';$~='*'|'`';$^='+'^'_';

For the Holidays, snowflakes with recursion rather than iteration inside:

#!/usr/bin/perl
           '?'                          =~(
         '('.'?'                      ."\{".(
        '`'   |'%'  ).('['^"\-").(  '`'|   '!'
         ).('`'|',').    '"'.    '\\'.('$').(
         '`'|(',')).(    '`'|    ')').(('`')|
        ((  '-')   )).    +(    '`'   |')'  ).
       (((    '['   ))^+  ((  '/')   )).    '='
      .('^'^   ('`'|'/')) .( '^'^("\`"|   '.')).
     +(     '^'^('`'|'.')).';'.('!'^"\+").     ((
 '\\')).'$'.('`'|'#').('`'|'/').('['^'.').('`'|'.').(
'['^  '/').'='.  (('^')^(    '`'|'/')  ).(';').(  '!'^
'+'    ).('['^    '(').(      ('[')^    "\.").(    '`'
|'"'  ).(('{')^  ('[')).(    '['^'+')  .('['^'.'  ).+(
 '['^'(').('`'|'(').'_'.('['^')').('`'|'!').('`'|'.')
     .(     '`'|'$').('{'^'[').'\\'."\{".(     ((
      '!'))^   '+').('{'^ (( ('[')))).(   ('{')^
       '['    ).(   '{'^  ((  '[')   )).    (((
        ((  '{')   )))    ^+    '['   ).+(  ((
         '['))^')').(    '`'|    '%').(('[')^
         '/').(('[')^    '.')    .('['^')').(
        '`'   |'.'  ).('{'^"\[").(  '`'|   ')'
         ).('`'|                      "\&").(
           '{'                          ^((
           '['                          )))
         .'\\'.+                      '$'.'#'
        .+(   '`'|  '!').('['^')')  .''.   (((
         '['))^')').(    '`'|    '!').(('[')^
         '"').('_').(    '`'|    '/').(('`')|
        ((  '&')   )).    ((    '_'   )).(  ((
       '['    ))^   ')')  .(  '`'|   '!'    ).(
      ('`')|   '.').('`'| (( ('$')))).(   ('[')^
     ((     '('))).'>'.'\\'.'$'.('`'|',').     +(
 '`'|')').('`'|'-').('`'|')').('['^'/').';'.('!'^'+')
.''.  ('{'^'[')  .(('{')^    ('[')).(  '{'^'[').  ('{'
^((    '['))).    ("\["^      '+').(    '['^'.'    ).(
'['^  '(').('`'  |"\(").(    '{'^'[')  .'\\'.'@'  .''.
 ('`'|'!').('['^')').('['^')').('`'|'!').('['^('"')).
     ((     '_')).('`'|'/').('`'|'&').'_'.     +(
      ('[')^   ')').('`'| (( ('!')))).(   ('`')|
       '.'    ).(   '`'|  ((  '$')   )).    (((
        ((  '[')   )))    ^+    '('   ).((  ((
         ',')))).('{'    ^'['    ).('['^')').
         ('`'|"\!").(    '`'|    '.').(('`')|
        '$'   ).((  ';')).('!'^'+'  ).+(   '{'
         ^'[').(                      '{'^'['
           ).(                          '{'
           ^((                          '['
         ))).''.                      (('{')^
        '['   ).+(  '['^'+').('['^  '.')   .+(
         '['^('(')).(    '`'|    '(').('_').(
         '['^(')')).(    '`'|    '!').(('`')|
        ((  '.')   )).    +(    '`'   |'$'  ).
       '('    .((   ')')  ).  ';'.   (((    '!'
      ))^'+'   ).'\\'.'}' .( '!'^'+').(   ('!')^
     ((     '+'))).('!'^'+').('['^('(')).(     ((
 '['))^'.').('`'|'"').('{'^'[').('['^'+').('['^')').(
'`'|  ')').('`'  |"\.").(    '['^'/')  .'_'.('['  ^')'
).(    '`'|'%'    ).('`'      |'#').    (('[')^    '.'
).+(  '['^')').  ('['^'('    ).("\`"|  ')').('['  ^'-'
 ).('`'|'%').('{'^'[').'\\'.'{'.('!'^'+').('{'^'[').(
     ((     '{'))^'[').('{'^'[').('{'^'[')     .+
      '\\'.+   '$'.("\["^ (( '/'))).'='   .('['^
       '+'    ).(   '`'|  ((  '/')   )).    (((
        ((  '[')   )))    ^+    '+'   ).+(  ((
         '{'))^"\[").    '\\'    .'@'.'_'.';'
         .('!'^'+').(    '*'^    '#').(('[')^
        '+'   ).+(  '['^')').('`'|  ')')   .+(
         '`'|'.'                      ).('['^
           '/'                          ).(
           '{'                          ^((
         '['))).                      ('\\').
        '"'   .''.  ('['^')').('`'  |'!'   ).(
         '`'|('.')).(    '`'|    '$').(('{')^
         '[').('\\').    '$'.    ('`'|"\#").(
        ((  '`')   )|+    ((    '/'   ))).  +(
       '['    ^((   '.')  ))  .''.   (((    '`'
      ))|'.'   ).('['^'/' ). ('{'^'[').   ("\`"|
     ((     '/'))).('`'|'&').('{'^'[').''.     ((
 '\\')).'$'.('`'|',').('`'|')').('`'|'-').('`'|')').(
'['^  '/').'='.  '\\'.'$'    .(('[')^  '/').'\\'  .''.
(((    '\\')))    .('`'|      "\.").    ('\\').    '"'
.';'  .('!'^'+'  ).("\*"^    '#').''.  '\\'.'$'.  ('`'
 |'#').('`'|'/').('['^'.').('`'|'.').('['^'/').('+').
     ((     '+')).';'.('!'^'+').('*'^'#').     +(
      ('[')^   '+').('['^ (( (')')))).(   ('`')|
       ')'    ).(   '`'|  ((  '.')   )).    (((
        ((  '[')   )))    ^+    '/'   ).((  ((
         '_')))).('['    ^')'    ).('`'|'%').
         ('`'|"\#").(    '['^    '.').(('[')^
        ')'   ).+(  '['^'(').('`'|  ')')   .+(
         '['^'-'                      ).('`'|
           '%'                          ).+
           '('                          .((
         '\\')).                      '@'.'_'
        .((   ')')  ).('{'^"\[").(  '`'|   ')'
         ).('`'|'&').    ('{'    ^'[').('(').
         '\\'.'@'.'_'    .')'    .';'.(('!')^
        ((  '+')   )).    ((    (((   '\\'  ))
       )))    .((   '}')  ).  ('!'   ^((    '+'
      ))).+(   '!'^'+').( (( '['))^'+')   .('['^
     ((     '.'))).('['^'(').('`'|'(').'_'     .(
 '['^')').('`'|'!').('`'|'.').('`'|'$').'('.')'.';'.(
'['^  '+').('['  ^"\)").(    '`'|')')  .('`'|'.'  ).+(
'['    ^"\/").    "\_".(      ('[')^    "\)").(    '`'
|'%'  ).(('`')|  ('#')).(    '['^'.')  .('['^')'  ).+(
 '['^'(').('`'|')').('['^'-').('`'|'%').'('.'\\'.'@'.
     +(     '`'|'!').('['^')').('['^')').(     ((
      '`'))|   '!').('['^ (( '"'))).'_'   .('`'|
       '/'    ).(   '`'|  ((  '&')   )).    '_'
        .(  '['^   ')'    ).    (((   '`')  )|
         '!').(('`')|    '.')    .('`'|'$').(
         '['^'(').')'    .';'    .'"'.'}'.')'
        );(   $:)=  '.'^'~';$~='@'  |'('   ;$^
         =(')')^                      '[';#;#
           ;#;                          #;#

In each case, the output is something like this:

rand 1 of 100=0.625268682212667
rand 2 of 100=0.30160434879096
...
rand 100 of 100=0.584811321826528

If you want to see the loops or recursion embedded within, you can use perl -MO=Deparse martini.pl or perl -MO=Deparse camel.pl etc.

Only with Perl, right???

If you want to generate these lovely things -- check out Acme::Eyedrops

share|improve this answer
    push @array, rand;
    push @array, rand;
    # ... repeat 98 more times
share|improve this answer
8  
You have taken the wimp's way out with your # ... repeat 98 more times ! –  Andy Lester Nov 3 '10 at 23:06
2  
No, he's just being managerial and delegated the boring work to the readers :) –  DVK Nov 3 '10 at 23:18

No perl loops:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

@ARGV=q!echo 'int rand(void); int printf(const char *format, ...); int main(void) { int i; for(i=0;i<100;++i)printf("%d\\\\n",rand()); return 0; }' | gcc -x c - && ./a.out |!;
chomp(my @array=<>);
share|improve this answer
1  
I double dog dare you to implement a Lisp interpreter in Perl without loops and then call the Lisp code :) –  DVK Nov 4 '10 at 18:08
    
err..........no –  ysth Nov 5 '10 at 1:39
    
<my best Biff voice>CHICKEN, McFly?!?!?! –  DVK Nov 5 '10 at 16:38
    
@DVK -1 for no end tag!!! don't worry I got your back: </my best Biff voice> –  Joel Berger Nov 14 '10 at 14:46

Someone asked for a pure regex solution. How about

#!/usr/bin/perl
open my $slf, $0;
undef $/;
(my $s = <$slf>) =~ s/./rand()." "/eggs;
$s .= rand();
share|improve this answer
    
@JadeNB: Why open $0 when it’s already open with __END__ and seek(DATA,0,0)? :) –  tchrist Nov 4 '10 at 23:12
    
Oh for goodness sake, self-modifying code! It will only produce 99 of them unless you insert a # at byte 0. That or another /g in your omelette. :) –  tchrist Nov 4 '10 at 23:17
    
IMHO it's NOT pure regex in a sense of you're still hard-coding a 100 char string, only as your own code (and need to fudge the code to get to 100 at that). Outside of "cool" value, I don't see it as any different than taking my original regex solution and replacing "Dx100" with a hardcoded string of 100 "D" characters. –  DVK Nov 5 '10 at 16:27
    
My idea of a pure regex solution was to have the counting-to-100 done via some regex magic WITHOUT having 100-char string to do the implicit looping for you. –  DVK Nov 5 '10 at 16:28
    
@DVK: Mine has no 100-char string, but good luck at catching it counting. :) –  tchrist Nov 5 '10 at 20:19

Recursion:

sub fill_rand {
 my ($array, $count) = @_;
   if ($count >= 1) {
   unshift @$array, rand();
   fill_rand ($array, --$count);
 }
}

my @array;
fill_rand (\@array, 100);

"Tail-call optimised" version:

sub fill_rand {
    my $array = shift;
    my $count = shift;
    unshift @$array, rand();
    if ($count > 1) {
       $count--;
       @_ = ($array, $count);
       goto &fill_rand;
    }
}

my @array;
fill_rand(\@array, 100);

Using eval:

my @array;
eval("\@array = (" . ("rand(), " x 100) . ");");

If you assume that my perl is random (not an unwarranted assumption), you could use the perl file itself as a source of random data:

open FILE, __FILE__ or die "Can't open " . __FILE__ . "\n";
my $string;
read FILE, $string, 100;
close FILE;
my @array = map { ord } split //, $string;

Of course, you'll get the same results every time, but this is useful for testing.

share|improve this answer
1  
Instead of using goto &fill_rand you could use Sub::Call::Recur or Sub::Call::Tail –  Brad Gilbert Nov 5 '10 at 14:39
    
@Brad Gilbert, thanks for the pointer; I'll look at that. –  Martin Broadhurst Nov 5 '10 at 14:45

Another silly method, how about using a tied array that return a random value ?

use strict;
use warnings;

package Tie::RandArray;
use Tie::Array;
our @ISA = ('Tie::StdArray');
sub FETCH  { rand; }

package main;
my @rand;
my $object = tie @rand, 'Tie::RandArray';
$#rand=100;
my @a= @somearray;
warn "@a";

Of course the tied array could cache the values, so that a second array would not be needed to have stable values.

share|improve this answer
@foo = (rand(), rand(), rand(), ... rand());
share|improve this answer
2  
syntax error at -e line 1, near ", ..." –  tchrist Nov 3 '10 at 23:59

Generate the data:

my @array = map { rand() } (0..99);

Print the data to show that you have the right result:

print "$_\n" foreach (@array);

The generation loop is hidden (there's no looping keyword visible - just a function/operator).

share|improve this answer
3  
No, I can still see it. It's right there! :-) –  rafl Nov 3 '10 at 22:55
    
@rafl: You've got better eyesight than me. I see no while, for, foreach, until (did I miss any?) in the generation line. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 3 '10 at 22:56
    
A map is debatably a kind of magic loop :) stackoverflow.com/questions/3019925/is-map-a-loop –  DVK Nov 3 '10 at 23:19
    
@DVK, @rafl: yes, of course map is iterating over a list; yes, there is is a loop-like effect; that's how you end up with 100 values. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 4 '10 at 2:52
my $u;

open(URAND, "/dev/urandom") || die $!;

read(URAND, $u, 100);

close URAND;

my @array = split(/ */, $u);
share|improve this answer
    
That doesn’t work properly. You need to read(URAND, $u, 100 * length pack("I") and then @array = unpack("I*", $u). Or $/ = \length pack "I"; @array = unpack("I*", <URAND>). –  tchrist Nov 4 '10 at 15:14
    
Oops, that needs $$/*=100. –  tchrist Nov 4 '10 at 16:15
1  
Dunno whether elwood’s ever coming back, but a proper urandom solution is just perl -le '$/ = \\(100*length pack "L"); print for unpack "L*" => <>' /dev/urandom. –  tchrist Nov 4 '10 at 17:11

Recursion:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings; use strict;

my @rands;
my $i=1;

sub push_rand {
    return if $#rands>=99;
    push @rands, rand;
    push_rand();
}

push_rand();

for (@rands) { print "$i: $_\n"; $i++; }
share|improve this answer

its ugly, but it works. the foreach is just to show that it does.

#!/usr/bin/perl

rand1();

$idx = 1;

foreach $item (@array) {
    print "$idx - $item\n";
    $idx++;
}

exit;



sub rand1() {
    rand2();
    rand2();
    rand2();
    rand2();
}

sub rand2() {
    rand3();
    rand3();
    rand3();
    rand3();
    rand3();
}

sub rand3() {
    push @array, rand;
    push @array, rand;
    push @array, rand;
    push @array, rand;
    push @array, rand;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That’s more like my first regex solution than most people realize. –  tchrist Nov 10 '10 at 4:15

As per requests from the listeners, a non-pure-regex solution:

$s="D" x 100; 
$s=~s/D/rand()." "/ge; 
@s=split(/ /,$s);
share|improve this answer
    
Come on now, you can do better than that. –  tchrist Nov 3 '10 at 23:57
1  
Meh. Why bother when Sinan's having so much fun and my brain's a total mush from 4 hours fighting with Eclipse. I literally ONLY did it because pst asked in his answer :) –  DVK Nov 4 '10 at 1:58
2  
Eclipse and I are not on speaking terms. –  tchrist Nov 4 '10 at 11:47
2  
@tchrist - incredible! –  DVK Nov 5 '10 at 16:39
1  
@DVK: Oh, it’s perfectly credible, being a sort of its own existence proof. It works just fine, as does the expanded version, with or without cpp  (1) installed—curiously enough. :) –  tchrist Nov 5 '10 at 20:17

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