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I was wondering if there was an inexpensive way to get the width and height of a JPEG after loading an array of bytes.

I know JpegBitmapDecoder can get the JPEG's pixel width and height but it loads alot of information as well, which I assume would be an expensive operation.

Is there another way to get the width and height from the array of bytes without decoding it?

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

For some unknown reason, instead of going to bed, I went to work on this.

Here's some code that solves this with minimal storage requirements.

void Main()
{
    var filePath=@"path\to\my.jpg";
    var bytes=File.ReadAllBytes(filePath);
    var dimensions=GetJpegDimensions(bytes);
    //or
    //var dimensions=GetJpegDimensions(filePath);
    Console.WriteLine(dimensions);
}
public static Dimensions GetJpegDimensions(byte[] bytes)
{
    using(var ms=new MemoryStream(bytes))
    {
        return GetJpegDimensions(ms);
    }
}
public static Dimensions GetJpegDimensions(string filePath)
{
    using(var fs=File.OpenRead(filePath))
    {
        return GetJpegDimensions(fs);
    }
}
public static Dimensions GetJpegDimensions(Stream fs)
{
    if(!fs.CanSeek) throw new ArgumentException("Stream must be seekable");
    long blockStart;
    var buf = new byte[4];
    fs.Read(buf, 0, 4);
    if(buf.SequenceEqual(new byte[]{0xff, 0xd8, 0xff, 0xe0}))
    {
        blockStart = fs.Position;
        fs.Read(buf, 0, 2);
        var blockLength = ((buf[0] << 8) + buf[1]);
        fs.Read(buf, 0, 4);
        if(Encoding.ASCII.GetString(buf, 0, 4) == "JFIF" 
            && fs.ReadByte() == 0)
        {
            blockStart += blockLength;
            while(blockStart < fs.Length)
            {
                fs.Position = blockStart;
                fs.Read(buf, 0, 4);
                blockLength = ((buf[2] << 8) + buf[3]);
                if(blockLength >= 7 && buf[0] == 0xff && buf[1] == 0xc0)
                {
                    fs.Position += 1;
                    fs.Read(buf, 0, 4);
                    var height = (buf[0] << 8) + buf[1];
                    var width = (buf[2] << 8) + buf[3];
                    return new Dimensions(width, height);
                }
                blockStart += blockLength + 2;
            }
        }
    }
    return null;
}

public class Dimensions
{
    private readonly int width;
    private readonly int height;
    public Dimensions(int width, int height)
    {
        this.width = width;
        this.height = height;
    }
    public int Width
    {
        get{return width;}
    }
    public int Height
    {
        get{return height;}
    }
    public override string ToString()
    {
        return string.Format("width:{0}, height:{1}", Width, Height);
    }
}
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1  
+1 I guess that's what it means to go above and beyond to provide an answer! –  BrokenGlass Nov 4 '10 at 1:34

I've read a CodeProject article about it a couple years back :) I'm not 100% sure how good it is, and haven't tested it myself, but the author's definitely happy with it; also his tests prove it's a LOT faster than reading the whole image, as you'd expect :)

Here's the article itself.. Hope it's what you need! http://www.codeproject.com/KB/cs/ReadingImageHeaders.aspx
The piece of code you're looking for starts about here:
http://www.codeproject.com/KB/cs/ReadingImageHeaders.aspx#premain3

UPD: Also, check the comments in the bottom.. Especially the last (top) one there.. Might be useful to make it more generic

Also, more in-depth, advanced info can be picked up here: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/graphics/iptc.aspx

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