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I have been working for some time on a library which performs numeric calculations. It is written in pure native C++, and until now I have been using simple console applications to test its functionality.

The time has come to build a GUI on top of the library - to better display tables of results and also to render them in graphical form.

I was always planning to use WPF to implement the UI and have spent some time researching it, but I am now having second thoughts. My worries about WPF are:

  1. Is it worth coupling my program to the .NET framework just for the sake of the user interface? .NET and WPF seem to add overhead in many forms, including:
    • Program complexity
      • Using .NET implies using a second language - and thus writing lots of messy interop code.
    • Runtime performance
      • In particular, WPF applications seem very slow to start up.
    • Deployment
      • Is .NET framework installation quick and easy? Does it require rebooting the machine?

  2. Rendering quality
    • This has improved in WPF 4, but display of standard elements still seems poor in some areas.

  3. Concern over whether performance and quality will improve in the future
    • Is it true that WPF is being de-emphasized within Microsoft (in favour of Silverlight)?

My worries are compounded by news of people moving away from WPF having faced similar issues - the most recent and highest-profile being Evernote.

Would you recommend I stick with my original plan and use WPF?

If so, what do you think about the above issues?
If not, what alternative libraries could I use to create a high-quality Windows GUI?


Edit:

Thanks to Reed Copsey for addressing my individual points. The reply suggests that most of the issues I have with WPF can be worked around.

It seems that using WPF will involve more work than would be ideal - including writing interop code and making tweaks to ensure good performance and high quality. Do people generally agree with the statement that, in spite of this, the best way to produce a top-quality UI is with WPF - rather than with any other framework?

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Within the last week, I think developers are actually starting to question the future of Silverlight a bit more than WPF. news.cnet.com/8301-27076_3-20021400-248.html?tag=mncol;title –  Inisheer Nov 3 '10 at 23:57
    
@JTA: My reading of the recent discussion around Silverlight is that developers are worried about its future in the browser. I'm sure Silverlight has a future in general - when Bob Muglia said “our strategy has shifted”, he also said “Silverlight is our development platform for Windows Phone” and mentioned “sweet spots” for Silverlight in media and line-of-business applications. My concern is that, if a major part of Silverlight's future is LoB [desktop] applications, where does that leave WPF? –  Paul Baker Nov 4 '10 at 0:30
    
It's interesting that the "Future of WPF" video (linked by Reed Copsey below) appears to back up my claim that WPF is being de-emphasized in favour of Silverlight. During the presentation (the only PDC session about WPF) the advice given is "Most projects should start with Silverlight [rather than WPF]". –  Paul Baker Nov 4 '10 at 10:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I'll try to address these in order. Spoiler: In my opinion, for the most part, the answer is yes.

Is it worth coupling my program to the .NET framework just for the sake of the user interface?

This depends on the interface requirements. Do you users need a good, solid, modern UI? If so, you'll want to use the right tool to deliver that requirement.

.NET and WPF seem to add overhead in many forms, including:

  • Program complexity
    • Using .NET implies using a second language - and thus writing lots of messy interop code.

You can use GDI+ via C++/CLI, and handle everything in one language. That being said, part of the reason people use other languages for this is productivity - it's actually very, very fast compared to making a GUI in C++. The interop code via C++/CLI is not very messy at all, at least not if your routines are class-based.

Runtime performance - In particular, WPF applications seem very slow to start up.

This can be an issue, to some extent. You can do a lot to mitigate it, however - but this will probably always be a bit slower to start than a lean, native codebase since it has to spin up the CLR + libraries.

Deployment - Is .NET framework installation quick and easy? Does it require rebooting the machine?

Yes on both counts, typically. That being said, most people already have the framework installed (esp. if you target .NET 3.5, but 4.0 is coming along nicely), so it's a non-issue. I always see this as a one-time thing, though - I'd much rather trade a nice user experience for a bit of deployment time, especially when it's a relatively pain-free deployment (.NET's very easy to install, just large and a bit time consuming).

Rendering quality - This has improved in WPF 4, but display of standard elements still seems poor in some areas.

I'd strongly disagree here. WPF is (esp. in v4), the premier platform for quality user interfaces. It's tough to beat the rendering quality options in WPF -

Concern over whether performance and quality will improve in the future - Is it true that WPF is being de-emphasized within Microsoft (in favour of Silverlight)?

No. There was even a good talk at the PDC of the future of WPF. Silverlight gets a lot more press, but that's mainly because it's not nearly as mature of technology, so it's changing more quickly. WPF is still their top of the line UI experience, and still getting new features added. It's also the suggested platform for interop with native code - while it's possible in SL using COM, it's not pleasant like in WPF.

Performance, threading issues, and airspace issues seem to be the future improvements in mind, according to the PDC talk. For details, watch "The Future of WPF."

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As a note, the blurry text (small fonts) can be resolved by using TextOptions.TextFormattingMode="Display" in your XAML. This alone has sold me on WPF 4, whereas I wouldn't touch the previous version. –  Inisheer Nov 3 '10 at 23:55
    
@JTA: Yes, that was probably the only real "quality" issue in WPF, and even then, it was a subjective issue. That being said, WPF 4 completely addresses this. –  Reed Copsey Nov 3 '10 at 23:56
    
Great link btw! –  Inisheer Nov 3 '10 at 23:59
    
Thanks for the comprehensive answer. Re program complexity: Your experience of interop via C++/CLI is obviously different to mine. I've found duplicating my native C++ data structures in C++/CLI and performing conversions between the two versions, including converting collections from STL to System.Collections.Generic, to require a large amount of boilerplate code. Am I doing something wrong? Re startup time: I think you're right to say that this issue can be mitigated - I notice that VS2010 is much faster to startup than Expression Blend, for example. –  Paul Baker Nov 4 '10 at 1:13
    
Re rendering quality: Unfortunately, I do still notice poor quality rendering in applications using WPF 4. For example, the text in VS2010's "Extension Manager" dialog looks really bad - it seems to be using greyscale font smoothing rather than ClearType. You mention "rendering quality options" - perhaps there is an option which should have been used to solve this issue? Thanks again, and I'll be sure to watch the "Future of WPF" video. –  Paul Baker Nov 4 '10 at 1:14

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