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I have the following convention for most of my projects:

/src
    /Solution.sln
    /SolutionFolder
        /Project1
        /Project2
        /etc..
/lib
    /Moq
        moq.dll
        license.txt
    /Yui-Compressor
        yui.compressor.dll
/tools
    /ILMerge
        ilmerge.exe

You'll notice that I do not keep external libraries inside the source folder. I'm also very interested in using NuGet but don't want these external libraries inside the source folder. Does NuGet have a setting to change the directory that all packages are loaded into?

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3  
Yes, yes, yes! This is exactly the project structure I use (or very very nearly), and I've always wondered with NuGet could support it... –  Noldorin Feb 28 '12 at 23:29
    
I've gone into detail on how to do this with this following answer: stackoverflow.com/a/19466173/564726. You often need to remove the solutionDir option from the restore command for it to work correctly. –  BrutalDev Oct 19 '13 at 12:56

6 Answers 6

up vote 135 down vote accepted

It's now possible to control which folder the packages are installed into.

http://nuget.codeplex.com/workitem/215

Edit: See Phil Haack's comment on Dec 10 2010 at 11:45 PM (in the work item/the link above). The support is partially implemented in 1.0, but is not documented.

According to @dfowler: Add a nuget.config file next to the solution with this:

<settings>
<repositoryPath>{some path here}</repositoryPath>
</settings>

There is a nuget package for creating the package folder override.

Update for version 2.1

As Azat commented, there is now official documentation on how to control the package locations. The release notes for 2.1 specifies the following configuration in a nuget.config file (see the release notes for a description of valid places to put the config files and how the hierarchical configuration model works):

<configuration>
  <config>
    <add key="repositoryPath" value="C:\thePathToMyPackagesFolder" />
  </config>
  ... 
</configuration>

This would change the packages folder for the configuration level you put the file in (solution if you put it in the solution directory, project in project directory and so on). Note that the release notes state:

[...] if you have an existing packages folder underneath your solution root, you will need to delete it before NuGet will place packages in the new location.

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4  
It actually is possible using the above config file. The reason it was de-emphasized is because we haven't though through the workflow of enabling this through the UI and other means so expect some quirkiness. –  dfowler Jan 21 '11 at 3:57
4  
See reviewboard.nupack.com/r/131 for a full description by @dfowler of how nuget.config works. For example, a valid nuget.config would look like this: <settings><repositoryPath>lib</repositoryPath></settings> –  Lee Harold Jul 9 '11 at 2:53
4  
docs.nuget.org/docs/release-notes/nuget-2.1 See "Specify ‘packages’ Folder Location" paragraph –  Azat Oct 17 '12 at 9:33
4  
this doesn't work for me. i tried it and no go. ????? –  Shane Km Nov 28 '12 at 6:49
3  
The second version works for me, I use latest NuGet, and now two solutions can share the same repo. I think it may not work some people because they might use absolute paths? It seems that absolute vs. relative path matters. –  Csaba Toth Apr 30 '13 at 15:33
  1. Created a file called "nuget.config".
  2. Added that file to my solutions folder

this did NOT work for me:

<configuration>
  <config>
    <add key="repositoryPath" value="..\ExtLibs\Packages" />
  </config>
  ... 
</configuration>

this did WORK for me:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<settings>
  <repositoryPath>..\ExtLibs\Packages</repositoryPath>
</settings>
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3  
I tried the accepted answer without any luck. This worked for me as well! –  Mike Schall Jan 7 '13 at 4:02
    
Same here. The configuration > config did not work, but the settings > repositoryPath did. –  Gene Reddick Jun 29 '13 at 19:12
    
Same here. settings > repositoryPath did the trick –  santiagoIT Sep 9 '13 at 21:04
    
Only the second solution works: docs.nuget.org/docs/reference/nuget-config-file –  cheesemacfly Nov 6 '13 at 21:44
1  
It depends on the version of NuGet that you are using. –  Bronumski Nov 27 '13 at 13:45

The solution proposed in release notes for 2.1 doesn't work out-of-the-box. They forgot to mention that there is code:

internal string ResolveInstallPath()
{
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(this.OutputDirectory))
    {
        return this.OutputDirectory;
    }
    ISettings settings = this._configSettings;

    ...
}

which prevents it from working. To fix this you need to modify your NuGet.targets file and remove 'OutputDirectory' parameter:

    <RestoreCommand>$(NuGetCommand) install "$(PackagesConfig)" -source "$(PackageSources)"  $(RequireConsentSwitch)</RestoreCommand>

So now, if you add 'repositoryPath' config somewhere in NuGet.config (see the release notes for a description of valid places to put the config files), it will restore all packages into single location, but... Your .csproj still contains hints to assemblies written as relative paths...

I still don't understand why they went hard way instead of changing PackageManager so it would add hint paths relative to PackagesDir. That's the way I do manually to have different package locations locally (on my desktop) and on build agent.

<Reference Include="Autofac.Configuration, Version=2.6.3.862, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=17863af14b0044da, processorArchitecture=MSIL">
  <Private>True</Private>
  <HintPath>$(PackagesDir)\Autofac.2.6.3.862\lib\NET40\Autofac.Configuration.dll</HintPath>
</Reference>
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You are absolutely right. At my company we actually use a version of NuGet that we modified ourselves that does exactly what you are describing, i.e. it adds HintPaths relative to the Packages Dir not relative to the location of the project file. This works perfectly well. Unfortunately we never got around to trying to bring in the changes we made to NuGet to the official version, but maybe it's time to do that now... –  afrischke Mar 14 '13 at 22:04
1  
@afrischke: that would be great if you could do that. thanks. Any idea when this might happen? –  sgtz Mar 27 '13 at 13:43

In addition to Shane Kms answer, if you've activated Nuget Package Restore, you edit the NuGet.config located in the .nuget-folder as follows:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<configuration>
  <repositoryPath>..\..\ExtLibs\Packages</repositoryPath>
</configuration>

Notice the extra "..\", as it backtracks from the .nuget-folder and not the solution folder.

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The config file in the accepted answer works for me in VS2012. However, for me it only works when I do the following:

  1. Create a new project in VS.
  2. Exit VS - this seems to be important.
  3. Copy the config files to the project folder.
  4. Restart VS and add packages.

If I follow those steps I can use a shared package folder.

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Restarting VS is the only way I got this to work. Guess the package manager caches it. –  Filip Nov 8 '13 at 21:24

Okay for the sake of anyone else reading this post - here is what I understand of the myriad of answers above:

  1. The nuget.config file in the .nuget folder is relative to that folder. This is important because if your new folder is something like '../Packages' that will put it where it always goes out of the box. As @bruce14 states you must do '../../Packages' instead

  2. I could not get the latest nuget (2.8.5) to find a packages folder outside of the standard location without enabling package restore. So once you enable package restore then the following should be added to the nuget.config file inside of the .nuget folder to change the location:

    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
    <configuration>
      ...
      <config>
        <add key="repositoryPath" value="..\..\Packages" />
      </config>
      ...
    </configuration>
    
  3. (This is important) If you make ANY changes to the package folder location inside of the nuget.config files you must restart visual studio or close/reload the solution for the changes to take effect

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