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I want to measure and analyze user movements and gestures in the UI in order to refine the application user experience. I had imagined that feature-tracking libraries (like EQATEC or Preemptive's Runtime Intelligence) would allow this. However, this does not appear to be the case.

Ideally, I'd like to be able to instrument a UI and then capture mouse and keyboard navigation gestures to display via a heat-map.

My searches have come up empty. Does anything OSS or commercial exist here?

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5 Answers 5

  1. Download Sources Version 2 from this article on code project
  2. Open the solution or only Gma.UserActivityMonitor project and blindly convert it to .NET 4.0
  3. In HookManager.Callbacks.cs file make following changes.

    1. Add using System.Diagnostics;
    2. Replace

      s_MouseHookHandle = SetWindowsHookEx(
          WH_MOUSE_LL,
          s_MouseDelegate,
          Marshal.GetHINSTANCE(
              Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetModules()[0]),
          0);
      

      With

      using (Process curProcess = Process.GetCurrentProcess())
      using (ProcessModule curModule = curProcess.MainModule)
      {
          s_MouseHookHandle = SetWindowsHookEx(
              WH_MOUSE_LL,
              s_MouseDelegate,
             GetModuleHandle(curModule.ModuleName), 0);
      }
      
    3. Replace

      s_KeyboardHookHandle = SetWindowsHookEx(
          WH_KEYBOARD_LL,
          s_KeyboardDelegate,
          Marshal.GetHINSTANCE(
              Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetModules()[0]),
          0);
      

      With

      using (Process curProcess = Process.GetCurrentProcess())
      using (ProcessModule curModule = curProcess.MainModule)
      {
          s_KeyboardHookHandle = SetWindowsHookEx(
          WH_KEYBOARD_LL,
          s_KeyboardDelegate, 
          GetModuleHandle(curModule.ModuleName), 0);
      }
      
  4. In HookManager.Windows.cs add following two lines anywhere in HookManager class's definition.

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
    public static extern IntPtr GetModuleHandle(string lpModuleName);
    
  5. Now you should be able to build this and keep it aside. Now starts the WPF part.

  6. Create new WPF project with name WpfApplication1 preferably. Add reference to the project/assembly you built in step 1-5, add reference to System.Windows.Forms.
  7. Now Replace the MainWindow.xaml with following XAML make sure to check class name and project-name, I just created WpfApplication1 for testing.

    <Window x:Class="WpfApplication1.MainWindow"
            xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
            xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
            Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">
        <Grid>
            <Grid.RowDefinitions>
                <RowDefinition Height="0.30*"/>
                <RowDefinition Height="0.70*"/>
            </Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <StackPanel Grid.Row="0" Orientation="Horizontal">
                <StackPanel Orientation="Vertical">
                    <CheckBox Name="MouseMove" Padding="5" Content="Mouse Move" Width="120" Height="30" Click="checkBoxOnMouseMove_CheckedChanged"/>
                    <CheckBox Name="MouseClick" Padding="5" Content="Mouse Click" Width="120" Height="30" Click="checkBoxOnMouseClick_CheckedChanged"/>
                    <CheckBox Name="MouseDown" Padding="5" Content="Mouse Down" Width="120" Height="30" Click="checkBoxOnMouseDown_CheckedChanged"/>
                </StackPanel>
                <StackPanel Orientation="Vertical">
                    <CheckBox Name="MouseUp" Padding="5" Content="Mouse Up" Width="120" Height="30" Click="checkBoxOnMouseUp_CheckedChanged"/>
                    <CheckBox Name="MouseDouble" Padding="5" Content="Mouse Double" Width="120" Height="30" Click="checkBoxMouseDoubleClick_CheckedChanged"/>
                    <CheckBox Name="MouseWheel" Padding="5" Content="Mouse Wheel" Width="120" Height="30" Click="checkBoxMouseWheel_CheckedChanged"/>
                </StackPanel>
                <StackPanel Orientation="Vertical">
                    <CheckBox Name="KeyDown" Padding="5" Content="Key Down" Width="120" Height="30" Click="checkBoxKeyDown_CheckedChanged"/>
                    <CheckBox Name="KeyPress" Padding="5" Content="Key Press" Width="120" Height="30" Click="checkBoxKeyPress_CheckedChanged"/>
                    <CheckBox Name="KeyUp" Padding="5" Content="Key Up" Width="120" Height="30" Click="checkBoxKeyUp_CheckedChanged"/>
                </StackPanel>
                <StackPanel Orientation="Vertical">
                    <TextBlock Name="labelMousePosition" Text="x={0:####}; y={1:####}"/>
                    <TextBlock Name="labelWheel" Text="Wheel={0:####}"/>
                </StackPanel>
            </StackPanel>
            <TextBlock Name="textBoxLog" Text="START" VerticalAlignment="Stretch" HorizontalAlignment="Stretch" Grid.Row="1" ScrollViewer.VerticalScrollBarVisibility="Visible"/>
        </Grid>
    </Window>
    
  8. Now add following code to MainWindow class defined MainWindow.xaml.cs file.

    #region Check boxes to set or remove particular event handlers.
    
    private void checkBoxOnMouseMove_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if ((bool)MouseMove.IsChecked)
        {
            HookManager.MouseMove += HookManager_MouseMove;
        }
        else
        {
            HookManager.MouseMove -= HookManager_MouseMove;
        }
    }
    
    private void checkBoxOnMouseClick_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if ((bool)MouseClick.IsChecked)
        {
            HookManager.MouseClick += HookManager_MouseClick;
        }
        else
        {
            HookManager.MouseClick -= HookManager_MouseClick;
        }
    }
    
    private void checkBoxOnMouseUp_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if ((bool)MouseUp.IsChecked)
        {
            HookManager.MouseUp += HookManager_MouseUp;
        }
        else
        {
            HookManager.MouseUp -= HookManager_MouseUp;
        }
    }
    
    private void checkBoxOnMouseDown_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if ((bool)MouseDown.IsChecked)
        {
            HookManager.MouseDown += HookManager_MouseDown;
        }
        else
        {
            HookManager.MouseDown -= HookManager_MouseDown;
        }
    }
    
    private void checkBoxMouseDoubleClick_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if ((bool)this.MouseDouble.IsChecked)
        {
            HookManager.MouseDoubleClick += HookManager_MouseDoubleClick;
        }
        else
        {
            HookManager.MouseDoubleClick -= HookManager_MouseDoubleClick;
        }
    }
    
    private void checkBoxMouseWheel_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if ((bool)MouseWheel.IsChecked)
        {
            HookManager.MouseWheel += HookManager_MouseWheel;
        }
        else
        {
            HookManager.MouseWheel -= HookManager_MouseWheel;
        }
    }
    
    private void checkBoxKeyDown_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if ((bool)KeyDown.IsChecked)
        {
            HookManager.KeyDown += HookManager_KeyDown;
        }
        else
        {
            HookManager.KeyDown -= HookManager_KeyDown;
        }
    }
    
    
    private void checkBoxKeyUp_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if ((bool)KeyUp.IsChecked)
        {
            HookManager.KeyUp += HookManager_KeyUp;
        }
        else
        {
            HookManager.KeyUp -= HookManager_KeyUp;
        }
    }
    
    private void checkBoxKeyPress_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if ((bool)KeyPress.IsChecked)
        {
            HookManager.KeyPress += HookManager_KeyPress;
        }
        else
        {
            HookManager.KeyPress -= HookManager_KeyPress;
        }
    }
    
    #endregion
    
    //##################################################################
    #region Event handlers of particular events. They will be activated when an appropriate check box is checked.
    
    private void HookManager_KeyDown(object sender, System.Windows.Forms.KeyEventArgs e)
    {
        textBoxLog.Text += (string.Format("KeyDown - {0}\n", e.KeyCode));
    
    }
    
    private void HookManager_KeyUp(object sender, System.Windows.Forms.KeyEventArgs e)
    {
        textBoxLog.Text += (string.Format("KeyUp - {0}\n", e.KeyCode));
    
    }
    
    
    private void HookManager_KeyPress(object sender, System.Windows.Forms.KeyPressEventArgs e)
    {
        textBoxLog.Text += (string.Format("KeyPress - {0}\n", e.KeyChar));
    
    }
    
    
    private void HookManager_MouseMove(object sender, System.Windows.Forms.MouseEventArgs e)
    {
        labelMousePosition.Text = string.Format("x={0:0000}; y={1:0000}", e.X, e.Y);
    }
    
    private void HookManager_MouseClick(object sender, System.Windows.Forms.MouseEventArgs e)
    {
        textBoxLog.Text += (string.Format("MouseClick - {0}\n", e.Button));
    
    }
    
    
    private void HookManager_MouseUp(object sender, System.Windows.Forms.MouseEventArgs e)
    {
        textBoxLog.Text += (string.Format("MouseUp - {0}\n", e.Button));
    
    }
    
    
    private void HookManager_MouseDown(object sender, System.Windows.Forms.MouseEventArgs e)
    {
        textBoxLog.Text += (string.Format("MouseDown - {0}\n", e.Button));
    
    }
    
    
    private void HookManager_MouseDoubleClick(object sender, System.Windows.Forms.MouseEventArgs e)
    {
        textBoxLog.Text += (string.Format("MouseDoubleClick - {0}\n", e.Button));
    
    }
    
    
    private void HookManager_MouseWheel(object sender, System.Windows.Forms.MouseEventArgs e)
    {
        labelWheel.Text = string.Format("Wheel={0:000}", e.Delta);
    }
    
    #endregion
    

9.Build and run your WPF App, you might need to add using Gma.UserActivityMonitor; directive in MainWindow.

10.All the credit goes to George Mamaladze who originally built it, you might want to send a thank you note to him, also check the distribution license for this code from original author if you want to make money out of it.

11.I just made couple of minor changes to make it work with WPF. Thanks for following this long post, I'm not sure how to share this code, that is why providing instructions like this.

12.I'm seriously sucking at formatting the code well on SO, can someone leave a comment on how to format code, XML well. Also someone help me format snippets in this post. Thank you.

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if my edit gets accepted look at the revision history to see how to format –  Markus Hütter Mar 5 '11 at 10:56
    
Thanks @Markus. –  Sanjeevakumar Hiremath Mar 5 '11 at 11:21
    
This works ok, but it's pretty intrusive. I've come up with something which is similar, but not as heavy. –  codekaizen Mar 8 '11 at 22:58
    
Agreed, but I couldn't think of any alternatives :( –  Sanjeevakumar Hiremath Mar 8 '11 at 23:01
up vote 2 down vote accepted

After trying a number of approaches, including the ones here as well as using UIAutomation Events and ETW for WPF, I've decided on a simple attachment of a handler to WPF events. This allows me to not only capture the event data, but also the UIElement which has the users attention, so it is much easier to trace the user action and intention. Without this, I'd need to capture a visual of the screen and make a visual determination of what is going on.

Here's a sample:

private Int32 _eventCount;

public MainWindow()
{
    InitializeComponent();
    EventManager.RegisterClassHandler(typeof(UIElement), MouseEnterEvent, (RoutedEventHandler)handleEvent, true);
    EventManager.RegisterClassHandler(typeof(UIElement), MouseLeaveEvent, (RoutedEventHandler)handleEvent, true);
    EventManager.RegisterClassHandler(typeof(UIElement), MouseMoveEvent, (RoutedEventHandler)handleEvent, true);
    EventManager.RegisterClassHandler(typeof(UIElement), MouseUpEvent, (RoutedEventHandler)handleEvent, true);
    EventManager.RegisterClassHandler(typeof(UIElement), MouseDownEvent, (RoutedEventHandler)handleEvent, true);
    EventManager.RegisterClassHandler(typeof(UIElement), KeyUpEvent, (RoutedEventHandler)handleEvent, true);
    EventManager.RegisterClassHandler(typeof(UIElement), KeyDownEvent, (RoutedEventHandler)handleEvent, true);
}

private void handleEvent(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    var uiElement = e.Source as UIElement;

    if (uiElement == null)
    {
        return;
    }

    EventStatusDisplay.Text = e.Source + " " + e.RoutedEvent.Name;
    EventCountDisplay.Text = (++_eventCount).ToString();
    var over = Mouse.DirectlyOver as UIElement;
    MouseIsOverDisplay.Text = over == null ? "" : over.ToString();
}

While it is not shown here, once I get the UIElement I perform logging and can even then use the UIElement.DataContext to determine the state of the ViewModel which is driving the view so we can find patterns of usage during certain workflows and data-states as well as visual states. We can then get reports on this, as well as differentiate and compare our heat maps by paths through workflow and data values.

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Have a look at this application. It does not do what you want but it might be useful as a starting point for implementing the features you need: Perceptor: An artificially intelligent guided navigation system for WPF

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Thanks Giorgi - it is an interesting project, but it really is more skewed for using the exact input I want to capture. The way it captures input is a bit intrusive (a custom UIElement and set of attached properties). I'd rather find something I don't have to modify code to use. –  codekaizen Mar 3 '11 at 23:20

Try http://iographica.com it creates lines where the mouse cursor moved, and circles where the mouse cursor stopped, the bigger the circle, the longer it was stopped there.

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This looks like what I want to see, however, in order to correlate the output to user elements and then to user stories, I'd have to capture screenshots along with the output of IOGraphica, and then use some kind of analysis to determine what the user was actually doing with their input. This would be too much work. –  codekaizen Mar 3 '11 at 23:23

I know Snoop is more a tool for inspecting the visual tree of a WPF application, but it does also capture events (especially it captures these with information on which elements they happened, how they traveled in the visual tree and where they get handled). As it is open source you might want to extract that part about tracking events out and log this information to your needs.

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