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How can I check if a string contains all question marks? Like this:

string input = "????????";

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8 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted
var isAllQuestionMarks = input.All(c => c == '?');
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You can use Enumerable.All:

bool isAllQuestion = input.All(c => c=='?');
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        string = "????????";
        bool allQuestionMarks = input  == new string('?', input.Length);

Just ran a comparison:

this way is heaps x faster than the input.All(c => c=='?');

public static void Main() {
            Stopwatch w = new Stopwatch();
            string input = "????????";
            w.Start();
            bool allQuestionMarks;
            for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i ) {
                allQuestionMarks = input == new string('?', input.Length);
            }
            w.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("String way {0}", w.ElapsedTicks);


            w.Reset();
            w.Start();
            for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i) {
                allQuestionMarks = input.All(c => c=='?');
            }
            Console.WriteLine(" Linq way {0}", w.ElapsedTicks);
            Console.ReadKey();
        }

String way 11 Linq way 4189

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1  
You're not testing cases where they are NOT equal - it's an unfair test. You're only checking the worst case scenario for "All" –  Reed Copsey Nov 4 '10 at 1:09
1  
Please - I'm happy for you to correct it. Just make the test better and put the results in –  Preet Sangha Nov 4 '10 at 1:29
    
@Reed, where do you see negative checking? "All" fails on first non-matching element. –  greenoldman Nov 4 '10 at 7:02
    
@macias: Yes, but he's checking against a string where it will never fail early. His test is always creating the "worst case" scenario for All. –  Reed Copsey Nov 4 '10 at 15:07
    
@Reed, Preet (not "he") tests for string equality in case of match, which is also a worst case for string comparison. –  greenoldman Nov 5 '10 at 6:24
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So many linq answers! Can't we do anything the old-fashioned way any more? This is an order of magnitude faster than the linq solution. More readable? Maybe not, but that is what method names are for.

    static bool IsAllQuestionMarks(String s) {

        for(int i = 0; i < s.Length; i++)
            if(s[i] != '?')
                return false;

        return true;
    }
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bool allQuestionMarks = input.All(c => c == '?');

This uses the LINQ All method, which "determines whether all elements of a sequence satisfy a condition." In this case, the elements of the collection are characters, and the condition is that the character is equal to the question mark character.

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Not very readable... But a regular expression is another way to do it (and it's fast):

// Looking for a string composed only by one or more "?":
bool allQuestionMarks = Regex.IsMatch(input, "^\?+$");
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Define fast, because I think this is no faster than the linq solution, but without the readability. –  Mark Nov 4 '10 at 18:01
1  
Definition: fast enough. I'm not comparing regex with linq, I'm just showing an alternative way. I'm not that sure linq is more readable though - or you're saying that linq, a functional-monadic-dsl, is easier to understand than a regular expression...? :-) To me they both share similar characteristics: easy to write, not that easy to understand after you wrote it. –  rsenna Nov 4 '10 at 19:14
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you could do it in linq...

bool result = input.ToCharArray().All(c => c=='?');
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You can also try this:

private bool CheckIfStringContainsOnlyQuestionMark(string value)
{
    return !value.Where(a => a != '?').Select(a => true).FirstOrDefault();
}
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