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I did some reading about composition through articles in Java World: http://www.javaworld.com/javaworld/jw-11-1998/jw-11-techniques.html?page=1

On that article, it guides how to do inheritance without using extends keyword. I am doing that. Is that ok? It seems to work for me.

Here is the code:

Examples of inheritance codes: Page 2 of the article.\ According to the article, it works fine:

class Fruit {
    public int peel() {

            System.out.println("Peeling is appealing.");
            return 1;
        }
    }

class Apple extends Fruit {
}

class Example1 {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Apple apple = new Apple();
        int pieces = apple.peel();
    }
}

After modification, it's not longer ok:

class Peel {

    private int peelCount;

    public Peel(int peelCount) {
        this.peelCount = peelCount;
    }

    public int getPeelCount() {

        return peelCount;
    }
}

class Fruit {

// Return a Peel object that
// results from the peeling activity.
    public Peel peel() {

        System.out.println("Peeling is appealing.");
        return new Peel(1);
    }
}

// Apple still compiles and works fine
class Apple extends Fruit {
}

// This old implementation of Example1
// is broken and won't compile.
class Example1 {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Apple apple = new Apple();
        int pieces = apple.peel();
    }
}

Now reuse via composition:

class Fruit {

// Return int number of pieces of peel that
// resulted from the peeling activity.
public int peel() {

System.out.println("Peeling is appealing.");
        return 1;
    }
}

class Apple {

    private Fruit fruit = new Fruit();

    public int peel() {
        return fruit.peel();
    }
}

class Example2 {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Apple apple = new Apple();
        int pieces = apple.peel();
    }
}

Later changes:

class Peel {

    private int peelCount;

    public Peel(int peelCount) {
        this.peelCount = peelCount;
    }

    public int getPeelCount() {

        return peelCount;
    }
}


class Fruit {

// Return int number of pieces of peel that
// resulted from the peeling activity.
public Peel peel() {

System.out.println("Peeling is appealing.");
        return new Peel(1);
    }
}

// Apple must be changed to accomodate
// the change to Fruit
class Apple {

    private Fruit fruit = new Fruit();

    public int peel() {

        Peel peel = fruit.peel();
        return peel.getPeelCount();
    }
}

// This old implementation of Example2
// still works fine.
class Example1 {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Apple apple = new Apple();
        int pieces = apple.peel();
    }
}

And later it can do polymorph through interface: See the "Designing with interfaces" on Javaworld page 4. I can't post another link here.

interface Peelable {

int peel();
}

class Fruit {

// Return int number of pieces of peel that
// resulted from the peeling activity.
public int peel() {

System.out.println("Peeling is appealing.");
            return 1;
        }
    }

    class Apple implements Peelable {

        private Fruit fruit = new Fruit();

        public int peel() {
            return fruit.peel();
        }
    }

    class FoodProcessor {

        static void peelAnItem(Peelable item) {
            item.peel();
        }
    }

    class Example5 {

        public static void main(String[] args) {

            Apple apple = new Apple();
            FoodProcessor.peelAnItem(apple);
        }
    }

The key is instead of inheritance, we create a new instance of the superclass. Instead of traditional polymorphism. It is said that using this method is better than inheritance because inheritance is broken.

Edit: Later, if we want fruit to polymorph into different type rather than Apple, we can do this:

class Banana implements Peelable {

    private Fruit fruit = new Fruit();

    public int peel() {
        return fruit.peel();
    }
}

This is how polymorphism is done by composition. So, if a method requires a fruit which can be peelable, we just need to pass the Peelable objects to it instead of fruit.

Please read 3rd answer. I added more information for this topic.

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean "inheritance is broken"? What's broken about it? –  Neowizard Nov 4 '10 at 2:47
1  
<irony> Yeah, it's not my code that is lame... It is inheritance that is BROKEN and singletons that SUCK big time. :P </irony> –  rsenna Nov 4 '10 at 3:11
    
Eh, sorry. I should state it clearer. It's inheritance by extension like in Java. Please read 3rd answer below for more details. –  Amumu Nov 4 '10 at 4:39
    
I agree with what you're saying here. It's even got it's own pattern: Prefer composition over inheritance. I did downvote you however, because I think your question comes across as more of an answer. Ultimately, people will just have to make up their own mind about what techniques they choose to use. –  CurtainDog Nov 4 '10 at 7:26
    
@CurtainDog Ahh. But i'm still studying this. I'm currently studying design patterns, and my goal is to produce quality code (maintainable and extensible code, loose coupling high cohesion). This is just i've read for a while. I still need people opinions about it though. –  Amumu Nov 4 '10 at 8:04

3 Answers 3

If you're asking for comments, here's what I have to say:

Inheritance through composition is not necessarily better and not necessarily worse than strict inheritance through extends. They are for different purposes entirely.

One benefit of composition is that it allows a more limited set of potential operations in the API -- for instance, one might define a Stack class to inherit from LinkedList, but add a push() and a pop() method. However, there is no way to stop client code from abusing your stack by calling something like add(elem, 4) or get(5), which circumvents the stack. Composition solves this issue.

However, extending a class also has its benefits. For instance, say you want to make a Stack<Integer>, but you don't want any integers < 0. If you were to contain a Stack in your GreaterThanZeroStack, then you would have to include the methods push(), pop(), peek(), and whatever else is necessary for proper operation. This creates a lot of unnecessary, boilerplate, repetitive code. It also creates unnecessary upkeep if you add another method to your stack like punch(). If instead you extend Stack, then you only have to override one method -- add(Integer i). In addition, you can now declare this as Stack<Integer> s = new GreaterThanZeroStack(), or pass it into methods where a parameter Stack s is accepted. Could you do this with composition? Not a chance.

Composition and extension have two completely separate purposes, and inheritance by composition is not necessarily the pattern to follow.


In your case, inheritance by extension is correct. An apple is a Fruit. An apple does not contain a Fruit. If you were to add another method to Fruit, such as weight(), then Apple would get that for free, whereas with composition, Apple would have to reimplement the method to say something like:

public int weight() {
    return fruit.weight();
}

and then change that every time something changes about the weight, like its return type or name.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree that inheritnace by extension reduces overhead code. As explained in the article, imo, one benefit of inheritance through composition is you can program through an interface. thus if you change one of the method in superclass, code which is using it will be broken. –  Amumu Nov 4 '10 at 3:15
    
But why do that if you already have an "interface"--in the form of a parent class--built in? Look, in order to extend JFrame, would you want to have tons of code for each public method thereof? No! That's the point of inheritance in the first place -- you don't have to! –  Christian Mann Nov 4 '10 at 3:18
    
Good point. I think the reason we can use extend with JFrame is because its implementation remains unchangable to the people use it. It can only be changed by its creators. However, for our own application, software always changes. If we make change to the superclass, it will affect the entire applciation. But, so what's the reason for the article to eliminate the uses of "extend": javaworld.com/javaworld/jw-08-2003/jw-0801-toolbox.html?page=2 –  Amumu Nov 4 '10 at 5:08
    
The GreaterThanZeroStack highlights a major problem with inheritance: that of the fragile base class. In this case it is possible for Stack to be modified to include a new method that inadvertantly breaks the contract of the child (say by overloading the add() method). No exceptions, no warnings, no errors, until your program suddenly falls over that is. –  CurtainDog Nov 4 '10 at 7:19
    
If you want to override the weight method, just don't put in fruit.weight(), and write your own code there. –  Amumu Nov 4 '10 at 12:07

An important consideration is that with composition you loose the "is-a" relationship. An Apple which composites a Fruit is not a Fruit, and can't be passed to a method which requires a Fruit.

It's not that inheritance is broken, only that it's over-used and misused.

The point in the comments about using interfaces for polymorphism is well made. If you are in total control, you can build entire systems using interfaces and composition. And you probably mostly should - "prefer composition over inheritance".

However, it's "prefer ... over", not "replace ... with". There are situations where the reasonable public interface of something is just too large to make sense writing pass-through wrapper methods for everything. I can think of a GUI toolkit I wrote which has 6 top-level abstract classes representing the core parts of a GUI system - they are absolutely correctly designed using inheritance, not interfaces. The base component has a large public interface of about 120+ methods. I sure wouldn't have wanted an interface for that and then implement 120 wrapper methods in every single concrete component.

share|improve this answer
1  
Hmm, you can still pass it to the method which requires Fruit by implements a common interface. In the example in my post, the author used interface peelable to do polymorphism. –  Amumu Nov 4 '10 at 4:41

Please have a look at this article: http://www.javaworld.com/javaworld/jw-12-1998/jw-12-techniques.html

In page 2, there's an example explaining the diamond problem which you can't inherit from multiple parents in Java.

In the article, the author introduced multiple inheritance in Java by doing it through interface.

Based on that, here's what I come up with how multiple inheritance in Java would look like:

interface Animal{
    public void getLegs();
}

class Dinosour implements Animal{
    int legs=4;
    public int getLegs(){
        return this.legs;
    }
}

class Frogs implements Animal{
    int legs=2;
    public int getLegs(){
        return this.legs;
    }
}

class Frogosour implements Animal {
    Dinosour father = new Dinosour();
    Frog mother = new Frog();
    int legs;
    public int getLegs(){
        return (father.getLegs()+mother.getLegs())/2;
    }
}

That's the idea of multiple inheritance i can come up after reading through the articles. What do you think?

I am asking because when I first study programming, it's always inheritance by extension that was taught. Now, as I heard my classmates said favor composition, even in the case of inheritance, is better than inheritance concept using extension. Thus, composition should be favored over inheritance, and another reason is that it is close to functional programming. I just want to hear different opinions on this.

share|improve this answer
    
I love the example! Frogosaur should also implement Animal but you're getting the hang of it. –  CurtainDog Nov 4 '10 at 8:55
    
Thank you. So if i want to implement a child of Frogosour (probably it has another Snake as a wife), I simply just implements all of Frogosour's interfaces (including the interfaces of its parents and its own interface of its own methods (children should be different from their parents after all)) as well as the Snake's interface. And so on the evolution goes on if it has further children. Is that how it work ultimately? –  Amumu Nov 4 '10 at 12:12

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