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This is IEEE 754 standard question. I don't completely understand the mechanics behind it.

public class Gray {  
    public static void main(String[] args){
        System.out.println( (float) (2000000000) == (float) (2000000000 + 50));
    }
}
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6  
By the way, this "problem" isn't limited to Java; it has to do with how floats are represented in binary, as defined by the IEEE 754 standard. –  In silico Nov 4 '10 at 6:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 29 down vote accepted

Because a float can only hold about 7 to 8 significant digits. That is, it doesn't have enough bits to represent the number 2000000050 exactly, so it gets rounded to 2000000000.

Specifically speaking, a float consists of three parts:

  • the sign bit (1 bit)
  • the exponent (8 bits)
  • the significand (24 bits, but only 23 bits are stored since the MSB of the significand is always 1)

You can think of floating point as the computer's way doing scientific notation, but in binary.

The precision is equal to log(2 ^ number of significand bits). That means a float can hold log(2 ^ 24) = 7.225 significant digits.

The number 2,000,000,050 has 9 significant digits. The calculation above tells us that a 24-bit significand can't hold that many significant digits. The reason why 2,000,000,000 works because there's only 1 significant digit, so it fits in the significand.

To solve the problem, you would use a double since it has a 52-bit significand, which is more than enough to represent every possible 32-bit number.

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I don't understand this statement: The reason why 2,000,000,000 works because there's only 1 significant digit, so it fits in the significand. –  fabrizioM Nov 4 '10 at 6:02
    
@fabrizioM: Do you understand why the number 2,000,000,000 has only 1 significant digit but the number 2,000,000,050 has 9 significant digits? –  In silico Nov 4 '10 at 6:06
    
ok so is splitted in 2^9 ( 2= significand 2 bits) (9 = exponent 4 bits) –  fabrizioM Nov 4 '10 at 6:12
    
@fabrizioM: The math is actually somewhat more complicated, but that's basically the gist of it. –  In silico Nov 4 '10 at 6:14

Plainly said - 50 is a rounding error when a float has a value of two-billion.

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1  
Plainly, but inaccurately :-) –  Stephen C Nov 4 '10 at 6:22
    
@Stephen - can you elaborate on why ? –  Mike Clark Nov 4 '10 at 10:29
1  
Because 50 simply the number 50. Because actual rounding errors are the differences between 200000000.0 and Real((float) 200000000) and between 200000050.0 and Real((float) 200000050). –  Stephen C Nov 4 '10 at 10:56

You might find this trick to find the next representable value interesting.

float f = 2000000000;
int binaryValue = Float.floatToRawIntBits(f);
int nextBinaryValue = binaryValue+1;
float nextFloat = Float.intBitsToFloat(nextBinaryValue);
System.out.printf("The next float value after %.0f is %.0f%n",  f, nextFloat);

double d = 2000000000;
long binaryValue2 = Double.doubleToRawLongBits(d);
long nextBinaryValue2 = binaryValue2+1;
double nextDouble = Double.longBitsToDouble(nextBinaryValue2);
System.out.printf("The next double value after %.7f is %.7f%n",  d, nextDouble);

prints

The next float value after 2000000000 is 2000000128
The next double value after 2000000000.0000000 is 2000000000.0000002
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Neat. Seems to depend on the significand (see In silico's answer) being in the least-significant bits of the int. I'm not sure how that holds up on different architectures, but maybe Java handles it consistently anyway? –  Tony D Nov 5 '10 at 3:40
    
It should be true for all IEEE floating point. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 5 '10 at 8:44

It might help you understand the situation if you consider a program (C++) as below. It displays the groups of successive integers that get rounded to the same float value:

#include <iostream>                                                             
#include <iomanip>                                                              

int main()                                                                      
{                                                                               
    float prev = 0;                                                             
    int count = 0;                                                              
    double from;                                                                
    for (double to = 2000000000 - 150; count < 10; to += 1.0)                   
    {                                                                           
        float now = to;                                                         
        if (now != prev)                                                        
        {                                                                       
            if (count)                                                          
                std::cout << std::setprecision(20) << from << ".." << to - 1 << " ==> " << prev << '\n';                                                        
            prev = now;                                                         
            from = to;                                                          
            ++count;                                                            
        }                                                                       
    }                                                                           
}

Output:

1999999850..1999999935 ==> 1999999872
1999999936..2000000064 ==> 2000000000
2000000065..2000000191 ==> 2000000128
2000000192..2000000320 ==> 2000000256
2000000321..2000000447 ==> 2000000384
2000000448..2000000576 ==> 2000000512
2000000577..2000000703 ==> 2000000640
2000000704..2000000832 ==> 2000000768
2000000833..2000000959 ==> 2000000896

This indicates that floating point is only precise enough to represent all integers from 1999999850 to 1999999935, wrongly recording their value as 1999999872. So on for other values. This is the tangible consequence of the limited storage space mentioned above.

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The question is not tagged C++ –  JeremyP Nov 4 '10 at 12:08
    
@JeremyP: I know that, but the floating point formats are typically standardised on a hardware basis and therefore common across languages, making the concepts applicable. I just happen to like C++ and not know Java. –  Tony D Nov 4 '10 at 14:54
    
yes, but it's not reasonable to expect a Java programmer to know what things like std::cout << something actually mean. –  JeremyP Nov 4 '10 at 16:10
    
@JeremyP: true, but hopefully they could cross-reference the program with the output and work out enough to rewrite it in Java if they wanted, or at least follow the core concept of how the higher-precision double is being used to step through the values that the float can't accurately represent. –  Tony D Nov 5 '10 at 0:58

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