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I'm having a problem counting the number of words in a file. The approach that I am taking is when I see a space or a newLine then I know to count a word.

The problem is that if I have multiple lines between paragraphs then I ended up counting them as words also. If you look at the readFile() method you can see what I am doing.

Could you help me out and guide me in the right direction on how to fix this?

Example input file (including a blank line):

word word word
word word

word word word
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An intimidating number of duplicates: stackoverflow.com/search?q=java+word+count –  Josh Lee Nov 4 '10 at 5:33
    
    
possible duplicate of Java word count program –  Adrian McCarthy Apr 20 '12 at 18:01

9 Answers 9

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I would change your approach a bit. First, I would use a BufferedReader to read the file file in line-by-line using readLine(). Then split each line on whitespace using String.split("\\s") and use the size of the resulting array to see how many words are on that line. To get the number of characters you could either look at the size of each line or of each split word (depending of if you want to count whitespace as characters).

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You can use a Scanner with a FileInputStream instead of BufferedReader with a FileReader. For example:-

File file = new File("sample.txt");
Scanner sc = new Scanner(new FileInputStream(file));
int count=0;
while(sc.hasNext()){
    sc.next();
    count++;
}
System.out.println("Number of words: " + count);
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1  
The above code gives the wrong count of words as it counts all the styles, adjustments etc.....just modify the code inside while loop with this String word=sc.next(); if(word.indexOf("\\")==-1) count++; This will give a bit more precise count.... –  Sangeet Menon Feb 26 '11 at 6:31

Hack solution

You can read the text file into a String var. Then split the String into an array using a single whitespace as the delimiter StringVar.Split(" ").

The Array count would equal the number of "Words" in the file. Of course this wouldnt give you a count of line numbers.

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import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.FileReader;

public class CountWords {

    public static void main (String args[]) throws Exception {

       System.out.println ("Counting Words");       
       FileReader fr = new FileReader ("c:\\Customer1.txt");        
       BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader (fr);     
       String line = br.readLin ();
       int count = 0;
       while (line != null) {
          String []parts = line.split(" ");
          for( String w : parts)
          {
            count++;        
          }
          line = br.readLine();
       }         
       System.out.println(count);
    }
}
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Just keep a boolean flag around that lets you know if the previous character was whitespace or not (pseudocode follows):

boolean prevWhitespace = false;
int wordCount = 0;
while (char ch = getNextChar(input)) {
  if (isWhitespace(ch)) {
    if (!prevWhitespace) {
      prevWhitespace = true;
      wordCount++;
    }
  } else {
    prevWhitespace = false;
  }
}
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I think a correct approach would be by means of Regex:

String fileContent = <text from file>;    
String[] words = Pattern.compile("\\s+").split(fileContent);
System.out.println("File has " + words.length + " words");

Hope it helps. The "\s+" meaning is in Pattern javadoc

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This is just a thought. There is one very easy way to do it. If you just need number of words and not actual words then just use Apache WordUtils

import org.apache.commons.lang.WordUtils;

public class CountWord {

public static void main(String[] args) {    
String str = "Just keep a boolean flag around that lets you know if the previous character was whitespace or not pseudocode follows";

    String initials = WordUtils.initials(str);

    System.out.println(initials);
    //so number of words in your file will be
    System.out.println(initials.length());    
  }
}
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+1 for referring to WordUtils –  keuleJ Nov 4 '10 at 18:25

3 steps: Consume all the white spaces, check if is a line, consume all the nonwhitespace.3

while(true){
    c = inFile.read();                
    // consume whitespaces
    while(isspace(c)){ inFile.read() }
    if (c == '\n'){ numberLines++; continue; }
    while (!isspace(c)){
         numberChars++;
         c = inFile.read();
    }
    numberWords++;
}
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The best way to answer is not to do it at all

" Abraham Lincoln" - Abraham Lincoln ( When asked about his name)

FileCounter() 
{
eastereggs = 0; 
bunnies = 0; 
carrots = 0; 
}
  1. Put an item in here
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