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I cannot convince why I can't add DML operation inside Oracle Function especially inside cursor loop. I feel Oracle don't support DML operation inside cursor loop.

How can I do If I need to insert into table inside cursor loop? Create new store procedure inside it or something else?

Error Message : cannot perform DML operation inside a query

Here is my function,

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION TEST_FUNC(U_ID IN VARCHAR2)
RETURN VARCHAR2
IS
  V_MESSAGE VARCHAR2(30);
  CURSOR C_PERSON (V_ID VARCHAR2) IS
         SELECT NAME_UPPER
         FROM TBL_PERSON
         WHERE NAME_UPPER = V_ID;                  
BEGIN
   FOR C_PERSON_CURSOR IN C_PERSON(U_ID) 
   LOOP
       INSERT INTO TMP_PERSON(NAME) VALUES (C_PERSON_CURSOR.NAME_UPPER);
   END LOOP;

   RETURN V_MESSAGE;

EXCEPTION
WHEN OTHERS THEN
    raise_application_error(-20001,'An error was encountered - '||SQLCODE||' -ERROR- '||SQLERRM);
END;
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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can use DML inside a PL/SQL function - no problem. However, the function can only be called from PL/SQL, not from SQL - i.e. it can be called like this:

declare
   l_message varchar2(30);
begin
   l_message := test_func('123');
end;

... but not like this:

select test_func(empno) from emp;

That leads to the error message you posted.

Many people (including me) don't like functions that have "side effects" like this, but that is a matter of best practice and standards, not a technical issue.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, That's what I'm asking for. –  ppshein Nov 5 '10 at 2:23

You can perform DML operations inside an Oracle PL/SQL function and, although this is generally not a good practice, call it from SQL. The function has to be marked with a pragma AUTONOMOUS_TRANSACTION and the transaction has to be committed or rolled back before exiting the function (see AUTONOMOUS_TRANSACTION Pragma).

You should be aware that this kind of function called from SQL can dramatically degrade your queries performances. I recommend you use it only for audit purposes.

Here is an example script starting from your function:

CREATE TABLE TBL_PERSON (NAME_UPPER VARCHAR2(30));
CREATE TABLE TMP_PERSON (NAME VARCHAR2(30));

INSERT INTO TBL_PERSON (NAME_UPPER) VALUES ('KING');

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION TEST_FUNC(U_ID IN VARCHAR2)
RETURN VARCHAR2
IS
  PRAGMA AUTONOMOUS_TRANSACTION; -- Needed to be called from SQL

  V_MESSAGE VARCHAR2(2000);
  CURSOR C_PERSON (V_ID VARCHAR2) IS
         SELECT NAME_UPPER
         FROM TBL_PERSON
         WHERE NAME_UPPER = V_ID;                  
BEGIN
   FOR C_PERSON_CURSOR IN C_PERSON(U_ID) 
   LOOP
       INSERT INTO TMP_PERSON(NAME) VALUES (C_PERSON_CURSOR.NAME_UPPER);

       V_MESSAGE := SQL%ROWCOUNT
          || ' Person record successfully inserted into TMP_PERSON table';
   END LOOP;

   COMMIT; -- The current autonomous transaction need to be commited
           -- before exiting the function.

   RETURN V_MESSAGE;

EXCEPTION
WHEN OTHERS THEN
    ROLLBACK;
    raise_application_error(-20001,'An error was encountered - '||SQLCODE||' -ERROR- '||SQLERRM);
END;
/

PROMPT Call the TEST_FUNC function and insert a new record into TMP_PERSON table
SELECT TEST_FUNC('KING') FROM DUAL;

PROMPT Content of the TMP_PERSON table
COL NAME FOR A30
SELECT * FROM TMP_PERSON;

When running the previous script we get the following output:

Table created.

Table created.

1 row created.

Function created.

Calling the TEST_FUNC function and insert a new record into TMP_PERSON table

TEST_FUNC('KING')
------------------------------------------------------------
1 Person record successfully inserted into TMP_PERSON table

Content of the TMP_PERSON table

NAME
------------------------------
KING
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1  
+1. Aside from the performance and transaction issues it's also very difficult to know exactly how many times the function will execute. For example, this statement does not call the function at all: select * from dual where exists (select test_func('KING') from dual); SQL is declarative and there's no way to guarantee exactly how a query will execute. –  Jon Heller Nov 4 '10 at 23:42
    
thanks. –  ppshein Nov 5 '10 at 2:24

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