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I have a system where cache max-age is set to 0 and there is problem, when I have made some changes in my style.css fail the changes dont apear to client. Browser will use the old cached version of css. I have simple question: Does naming css file as style.css?123 will be cached as a new?

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are you using IIS server or Apache? –  Zain Shaikh Nov 4 '10 at 10:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Yes, adding a unique query string to the resource's URI will force the client to fetch a "fresh" version (since the client doesn't know that it's merely an update of a previously cached resource). This is known as fingerprinting and you typically use a timestamp or an incrementing version number1 of the CSS file.

On Google Page Speed you can find a great article on cache optimization. Especially the paragraph titled "Use fingerprinting to dynamically enable caching."


1) This is what's done here on SO, e.g. http://sstatic.net/js/global-login.js?v=12

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Apparently, using the query string parameters is bad. See stackoverflow.com/a/13377291/637609 –  Mark W Nov 14 '12 at 10:56

You can append a unique query string, although this will use bandwidth.

You can rename your CSS file every time you make a change, IE:

main-v1.css main-v2.css main-v3.css

And then re-reference it in your pages. This saves bandwidth and forces browsers to reload it.

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How will main.css?v1 use more bandwidth than main-v1.css? (I guess I've misread your answer.) –  jensgram Nov 4 '10 at 10:19
    
main.css?v1 is actually the same, I meant for datestamping, it would load it every single time, when you only need it to load when there has been a change. Naming the css file differently on each change, or adding a querystring of version number are the 2 best ways. –  Tom Gullen Nov 4 '10 at 10:34
    
Apparently, using the query string parameters is bad. See stackoverflow.com/a/13377291/637609 –  Mark W Nov 14 '12 at 10:58

yes, appending a querystring parameter in each style.css file will force it to cache again.
because browser caches each static component with its url, so when url is changed, the new file will be cached.

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Apparently, using the query string parameters is bad. See stackoverflow.com/a/13377291/637609 –  Mark W Nov 14 '12 at 10:56

You can trick the browser into thinking it's a new stylesheet every second by timestamping your CSS:

<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="style.css?<?php echo date('l jS \of F Y h:i:s A'); ?>" />

Which will give you this:

<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="style.css?Thursday 24th of April 2008 04:45:21 PM" />

Taken from: Can We Prevent CSS Caching?

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Apparently, using the query string parameters is bad. See stackoverflow.com/a/13377291/637609 –  Mark W Nov 14 '12 at 10:57

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