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The intention of the following is to only allow the call IRegistration<Foo>.As<IFoo> if Foo implements IFoo:

interface IRegistration<TImplementation>
{
   void As<TContract>() where TImplementation : TContract;
}

This is not allowed by the C# 3.0 compiler. I get the following error:

'SomeNamespace.IRegistration.As()' does not define type parameter 'TImplementation'

Is there some way around this, other than putting both type parameters in the method declaration?

This question is inspired by this other question about Autofac.

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1 Answer 1

You are trying to add a constraint on a type parameter that does not exist in the type parameter list.

Is this what you meant?

interface IRegistration<TImplementation> where TImplementation : TContract
{
   void As<TContract>();
}

Though this will not compile either - you can't have a generic constraint on a generic type.

This will compile, though will probably not produce the constraint you want on the method itself:

interface IRegistration<TImplementation,TContract> where TImplementation : TContract
{
   void As<TContract>();
}

See if this will do:

interface IRegistration<TImplementation,TContract> where TImplementation : TContract
{
   void As();
}

This way, any time you use TImplementation, it will be constrained to be a TContract and you can still use TContract in the As method.

You can find more information here - look at the section towards the end of the page, titled "Type Parameters as Constraints".

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Hmm, don't think this works - TContract on the interface is different from TContract on the method. –  Tim Robinson Nov 4 '10 at 10:20
    
@Tim Robinson - good point. I was looking for something that will compile and forgot about the requirements... Answer updated. –  Oded Nov 4 '10 at 10:29
    
Agree with your updated answer - I can't think of any other way around this. –  Tim Robinson Nov 4 '10 at 10:38
    
I'm aware that there is no problem if the type parameters are declared together (both on the interface or both on the method) - that's not what I am interested in. To clarify I have added a link to the question that inspired this one. The correct answer to my question is probably a simple "no, you can't do that" but I asked anyway in case I missed something. –  Wim Coenen Nov 4 '10 at 10:41
    
@Wim Coenen - That's would be the answer... this is not something that will give you compile time type checks. I suspect that Autofac does some reflection during runtime to achieve type safety. –  Oded Nov 4 '10 at 10:44
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