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I wrote this script to find all files/directories to which $WWWUSER has write permissions. At first I stored the remaining, matching items in a temporary file. I new there must be a way without using files, so this is my "solution". It works, but it's pretty slow. Any tips?

Update: On a directory structure containing about 7k directories and 30k files (~8k whitelistings) the script takes about 15 minutes... (ext3 filesystem, UW320 SCSI harddisk).

#!/usr/bin/env bash
# Checks the webroot for files owned by www daemon and
# writable at the same time. This is only needed by some files
# So we'll check with a whitelist

WWWROOT=/var/www
WWWUSER=www-data
WHITELIST=(/wp-content/uploads
/wp-content/cache
/sitemap.xml
)
OLDIFS=$IFS
IFS=$'\n'

LIST=($(find $WWWROOT -perm /u+w -user $WWWUSER -o -perm /g+w -group $WWWUSER))
IFS=$OLDIFS

arraycount=-1
whitelist_matches=0

for matchedentry in "${LIST[@]}"; do
        arraycount=$(($arraycount+1))

        for whitelistedentry in "${WHITELIST[@]}"; do
                if [ $(echo $matchedentry | grep -c "$whitelistedentry") -gt 0 ]; then
                        unset LIST[$arraycount]
                        whitelist_matches=$(($whitelist_matches+1))
                fi
        done
LISTCOUNT=${#LIST[@]}
done

if [ $(echo $LISTCOUNT) -gt 0 ]; then
        for item in "${LIST[@]}"; do
                echo -e "$item\r"
        done
        echo "$LISTCOUNT items are writable by '$WWWUSER' ($whitelist_matches whitelisted)."
else
        echo "No writable items found ($whitelist_matches whitelisted)."
fi
share|improve this question
    
Is it possible to use any external application for running this, e.g. perl? It could be shortened and sped up quite a bit by using a hash for the whitelist references. Using a different Shebang it could be ran the same. – 0xCAFEBABE Nov 4 '10 at 10:59
    
It's possible yes, but not desired. But I'll check TME's idea, and then research how to implement yours. Thanks! – weeheavy Nov 4 '10 at 11:21
up vote 1 down vote accepted

(I don't have a setup handy to test this on, but it should work...)

#!/usr/bin/env bash
# Checks the webroot for files owned by www daemon and
# writable at the same time. This is only needed by some files
# So we'll check with a whitelist

WWWROOT=/var/www
WWWUSER=www-data
WHITELIST="(/wp-content/uploads|/wp-content/cache|/sitemap.xml)"

listcount=0
whitelist_matches=0

while IFS="" read -r matchedentry; do
    if [[ "$matchedentry" =~ $WHITELIST ]]; then
        ((whitelist_matches++))
    else
        echo -e "$matchedentry\r"
        ((listcount++))
    fi
done < <(find "$WWWROOT" -perm /u+w -user $WWWUSER -o -perm /g+w -group $WWWUSER)

if (( $listcount > 0 )); then
        echo "$listcount items are writable by '$WWWUSER' ($whitelist_matches whitelisted)."
else
        echo "No writable items found ($whitelist_matches whitelisted)."
fi

Edit: I've incorporated Dennis Williamson's suggestions on the math; also, here's a way to build the WHITELIST pattern starting from an array:

WHITELIST_ARRAY=(/wp-content/uploads
/wp-content/cache
/sitemap.xml
)

WHITELIST=""
for entry in "${WHITELIST_ARRAY[@]}"; do
    WHITELIST+="|$entry"
done
WHITELIST="(${WHITELIST#|})"  # this removes the stray "|" from the front, and adds parens

Edit2: Sorpigal's comment about eliminating new processes got me thinking -- I suspect most of the speedup in this version comes from not running ~40 invocations of grep per scanned file, and just a little bit from removing the array manipulation, but it occurred to me that if you don't need the totals at the end, you could remove the main while loop and replace it with this:

find "$WWWROOT" -perm /u+w -user $WWWUSER -o -perm /g+w -group $WWWUSER | grep -v "$WHITELIST"

...which does run grep, but only once (and runs the entire file list through that single instance), and once it's started grep'll be able to scan the list of files faster than a bash loop...

share|improve this answer
    
Hah, you posted code almost identical to mine while I was composing. +1 and mine deleted. Next time I'll remember not to get tripped up on subshell pipes. – Sorpigal Nov 4 '10 at 12:19
1  
Also, I think it's important to note here that optimizing this is a process of eliminating as many subshells and execs as possible. – Sorpigal Nov 4 '10 at 12:22
    
This is friggin great, down to 4 seconds execution time! Thanks alot everyone! – weeheavy Nov 4 '10 at 12:37
    
One question: How can i define the WHITELIST array line-by-line? I have over 40 items there. If I just split them by a newline it doesn't work. – weeheavy Nov 4 '10 at 13:05
1  
@weeheavy: Use the format for WHITELIST exactly as Gordon shows, but after each pipe character (|), add a backslash (``) and a newline. Note that the quotes, parentheses and pipes are essential since this is used as a regex pattern rather than an array as it was in your original version. – Dennis Williamson Nov 4 '10 at 14:33

There is another possibility. Changing the whitelist to a regex pattern you could use the =~ bash regex operator (version 3 and up) to match any found word quickly against the list: if($word=~$pattern) $pattern could be "^(whitelistentry1|whitelistentry2|whitelistentry3|...)$".

share|improve this answer
    
Didn't know this was possible with bash, I'll take a look at it. Thank you. – weeheavy Nov 4 '10 at 11:22

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