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I have two bytes, 8 bit octets, which should be read as: [3 bits][4 bits][3 bits].

Example:

unsigned char octet1 = 0b11111111;  // binary values
unsigned char octet2 = 0b00000011;

As integers: [7][15][7].

Anybody can give me a hint where to start?

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6  
...where to start what? –  Flinsch Nov 4 '10 at 11:20
    
What have you tried already? –  Oliver Charlesworth Nov 4 '10 at 11:22
4  
Homework? Nothing wrong with homework, but questions should be flagged as such. It helps the community to better pitch their answers to be most helpful. –  Binary Worrier Nov 4 '10 at 11:27
1  
Now that I'm thiking about it... 3+4+3 != 8 ... –  peoro Nov 4 '10 at 11:37
    
Thanks a lot for all the responders, just to clarify: I'm not asking anybody to do any 'homework' for me. I'm just a beginner who tries to understand how such a sequence being parsed. –  Doori Bar Nov 4 '10 at 11:45

10 Answers 10

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No need to put the two bytes together before extracting bits we want.

#include <stdio.h>

main()
{
    unsigned char octet1 = 0b11111111;
    unsigned char octet2 = 0b00000011;
    unsigned char n1 = octet1 & 0b111;
    unsigned char n2 = (octet1 >> 3) & 0b1111;
    unsigned char n3 = (octet1 >> 7) | (octet2 + octet2);

    printf("octet1=%u octet2=%u n1=%u n2=%u n3=%u\n",
              octet1, octet2, n1, n2, n3);

}
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1  
Nice way to not having to combine the octets as a word. I think I would have written (octet2 + octet2) as octet2<<2 though. Also this seems to only work if the higher bits of octet2 always is 0. It might be best to & 0b111 the last expression to save oneself from future troubles. –  Jonas Elfström Nov 4 '10 at 15:48
    
Thanks a lot, to me it seems like the most straight-forward approach. But unfortunately I didn't manage to 'fix' the issue Jonas raised, where the higher bits are not 0. I've tried: n3 = (octet1 >> 7) | (octet2 << 2); ? - I think it was supposed to be <<1, instead of <<2? –  Doori Bar Nov 4 '10 at 17:05
1  
unsigned char n3 = (octet1>>7 | octet2<<1) & 0b111; –  Jonas Elfström Nov 4 '10 at 18:51
    
Yes, correct octet2<<2 was wrong because that is the same as octet2*4. Sorry. –  Jonas Elfström Nov 4 '10 at 18:54
1  
Thanks once again! - just to clarify for beginners like myself: the "0b" suffix is not supported by all compilers/versions, so one should use 0x suffix instead. 0b11111111 = 0xFF , and so on... –  Doori Bar Nov 4 '10 at 19:13

Hi here is a method that is tested and compiled using VC++9

#pragma pack( 1 )

union 
{
    struct 
    {
        unsigned short val1:3;
        unsigned short val2:4;
        unsigned short val3:3; 
        unsigned short val4:6; 
    } vals;
    struct 
    {
        unsigned char octet1:8;
        unsigned char octet2:8;
    } octets;
    short oneVal;
} u = {0xFFFF};

unsigned char octet1 = 0xFF;  //1 1111 111
unsigned char octet2 = 0x03;  //000000 11
//000000 111 1111 111 0 7 15 7
u.octets.octet1 = octet1;
u.octets.octet2 = octet2;
cout << "size of u.vals:" << sizeof(u.vals)<< endl;
cout << "size of u.octets:" << sizeof(u.octets)<< endl;
cout << "size of u.oneVal:" << sizeof(u.oneVal)<< endl;
cout << "size of u:" << sizeof(u)<< endl;
cout << endl;

cout << "Your values:" << endl;
cout << "oneVal in Hex: 0x";
cout.fill( '0' );
cout.width( 4 );
cout<< hex << uppercase << u.oneVal << endl;
cout << "val1: " << (int)u.vals.val1 << endl;
cout << "val2: " << (int)u.vals.val2 << endl;
cout << "val3: " << (int)u.vals.val3 << endl;
cout << "val4: " << (int)u.vals.val4 << endl;
cout << endl;

octet1 = 0xCC;  //1 1001 100
octet2 = 0xFA;  //111110 10
//111110 101 1001 100 62 5 9 4
u.octets.octet1 = octet1;
u.octets.octet2 = octet2;

cout << "Some other values:" << endl;
cout << "oneVal in Hex: 0x";
cout.fill( '0' );
cout.width( 4 );
cout<< hex << uppercase << u.oneVal << endl;
cout << dec;
cout << "val1: " << (int)u.vals.val1 << endl;
cout << "val2: " << (int)u.vals.val2 << endl;
cout << "val3: " << (int)u.vals.val3 << endl;
cout << "val4: " << (int)u.vals.val4 << endl;
cout << endl;

octet1 = 0xCC;  //1 1001 100
octet2 = 0xFA;  //111110 10
//111110 101 1001 100 62 5 9 4
u.oneVal = ( (( unsigned short )octet2 ) << 8 ) | ( unsigned short )octet1;
cout << "Some thing diffrent asignment:" << endl;
cout << "oneVal in Hex: 0x";
cout.fill( '0' );
cout.width( 4 );
cout<< hex << uppercase << u.oneVal << endl;
cout << dec;
cout << "val1: " << (int)u.vals.val1 << endl;
cout << "val2: " << (int)u.vals.val2 << endl;
cout << "val3: " << (int)u.vals.val3 << endl;
cout << "val4: " << (int)u.vals.val4 << endl;
cout << endl;

Also note that I uses #pragma pack( 1 ) to set the structure packing to 1 byte.

I also included a way of assigning the two octets into the one short value. Did this using bitwise shift "<<" and bitwise or "|"

You can simplify the access to u by dropping the named structures. But I wanted to show the sizes that is used for the structures.

Like this:

union 
{
    struct 
    {
        unsigned short val1:3;
        unsigned short val2:4;
        unsigned short val3:3; 
        unsigned short val4:6; 
    };
    struct 
    {
        unsigned char octet1:8;
        unsigned char octet2:8;
    };
    short oneVal;
} u = {0xFFFF};

Access would now be as simple as

u.oneVal = 0xFACC;

or

u.octet1 = 0xCC;
u.octet2 = 0xFA;

you can also drop either oneVal or octet1 and octet2 depending on what access method you like.

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1  
You know your tired when Did this using bitwise shit makes you giggle. –  Jonas Elfström Nov 4 '10 at 15:36
    
@Jonas thanks for the spot. Fixed it should be "Did this using bitwise shift" :). –  Alien_SM Nov 4 '10 at 15:49
    
Yes, this is the most obvious way to do it in C (for someone who reads the code anyway). –  Christoffer Nov 4 '10 at 16:03

In a kind of pseudocode

octet1 = 0b11111111
octet2 = 0b00000011
word = octet1 | octet2<<8
n1 = word & 0b111
n2 = word>>3 & 0b1111
n3 = word>>7 & 0b111
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You might want to add parentheses for clarity. If your pseudocode is like C, then shifting does have higher precedence than & and |, but not everyone knows that. –  dan04 Nov 4 '10 at 15:20
    
I'm not so sure it can be called pseudocode at all because it's Ruby. Ruby has the same higher precedence for >> to & and | as C. I think that it shouldn't be necessary to know that | is bitwise or, & is bitwise and, and that >> and << bit shifts right and left to read pseudocode. As a pseudocode example for a C-programmer it might just work. –  Jonas Elfström Nov 4 '10 at 15:31
    
Thanks for your sample, your answer received the highest amount of votes - but frankly I think it would be more appropriate to select the one which actually is a C sample, and doesn't require the 3rd assignment of 'word' –  Doori Bar Nov 4 '10 at 17:17
    
I agree but this was only ment to educate, to show the concept, not to demonstrate the most efficient solution. Anyhow you should consider accepting the answer you liked best. –  Jonas Elfström Nov 4 '10 at 18:49
assert(CHAR_BIT == 8);
unsigned int twooctets = (octet2 << 8) | (octet1); /* thanks, Jonas */
unsigned int bits0to2 = (twooctets & /* 0b0000_0000_0111 */ 0x007) >> 0;
unsigned int bits3to6 = (twooctets & /* 0b0000_0111_1000 */ 0x078) >> 3;
unsigned int bits7to9 = (twooctets & /* 0b0011_1000_0000 */ 0x380) >> 7;
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2  
Shouldn't the first & be an |? –  Jonas Elfström Nov 4 '10 at 11:49
    
Yep, thank you. Code corrected. –  pmg Nov 4 '10 at 12:11

Do you mean, if we "concatenate" octets as octet2.octet1, we will get 000000[111][1111][111]?

Then you may use bit operations:

  • ">>" and "<<" to shift bits in your value,
  • "&" to mask bits
  • "+" to combine values

For example, "middle" value (which is 4-bits-length) may be received in the following way:

middle = 15 & (octet1 >> 3);
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Note: 0x11111111 doesn't mean 8 bits all set to 1. It's an hexadecimal number of 4 bytes, where any byte is set to 0x11.

0xFF is a single byte (8 bit) where any bit is set to 1.

Then, to achieve what you want you could use some MACROs to isolate the bits you need:

#define TOKEN1(x)  ((x)>>7)
#define TOKEN2(x)  ( ((x)>>3) & (0xFF>>5) )
#define TOKEN3(x)  ( ((x)>>5) & (0xFF>>5) )

Didn't test it.

Another idea, could be that of putting in an union a char and a struct using bitfield chars

union {
    struct { char a:3; char b:4; char c:3; };
    char x;
};

This way you can use x to edit the whole octet, and a, b and c to access to the single tokens...

Edit: 3+4+3 != 8.

If you need 10 bits you should use a short instead of a char. If, instead, some of those bits are overlapping, the solution using MACRO will probably be easier: you'll need more than one struct inside the union to achieve the same result with the second solution...

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Start from writing a packing/unpacking functions for your 2-byte hybrids.

If you so the work with C/C++ - you may use the intrinsic support for this:

struct Int3 {
    int a : 3;
    int b : 4;
    int c : 3;
};
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  oct2|  oct1
000011|1 1111 111
    ---- ---- ---
     7   0xf   7

Just a hint,(assuming it is homework)

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Bitfields could be one option. You may need to pad your struct to get the bits to line up the way you want them to.

Refer to http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3429802/bitfields-in-c or search StackOverflow for C++ and bitfields or you can use bitwise operators as outline in the other answers.

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You can use boolean opeations to get and set the individual values.

It's unclear which bits of your octets apply to which values but you only need & (bitwise AND), | (bitwise OR), << (left shift) and >> (right shift) to do this.

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