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template < unsigned int i >
struct t {
  static const char *s;
};
template < unsigned int i >
const char* t<i>::s = ...;

where ... is "0 1 2 ... i-1", for example "0 1 2 3 4" for i == 5.

Is this possible? (no solutions doing this at run-time, please!)

  • Question asked out of curiosity (doing it with preprocessor macros / constants would be easy, but how about template parameters)?
  • The meaning is: compile-time generated string literal. I see now that const does not force this, but could take any run-time evaluated function for string generation.
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1  
This is simply not possible. What is it you are trying to achieve by this? –  Moo-Juice Nov 4 '10 at 11:26
1  
@Moo: curiosity, no usage yet. If i was a preprocessor constant, it would be easy, but with templates I could not think of a way to solve this. –  Thomas Nov 4 '10 at 11:35
    
@Reno: Template, because there might be multiple instantiations for various i; how could I rewrite this without a struct? I don't think that template < int i > const char* s = ...; would compile. –  Thomas Nov 4 '10 at 11:37
1  
thanks for editing :] –  Reno Nov 4 '10 at 12:04
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6 Answers 6

This is technically possible, it's just very very ugly. Here's a sample that generates a string literal for an unsigned int. It does not (yet) create a string of the form "1 2 3 ... i-1", however I'm sure it is possible if you're willing to spend the effort.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <limits>

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// exponentiation calculations
template <int accum, int base, int exp> struct POWER_CORE : POWER_CORE<accum * base, base, exp - 1>{};

template <int accum, int base>
struct POWER_CORE<accum, base, 0>
{
    enum : int { val = accum };
};

template <int base, int exp> struct POWER : POWER_CORE<1, base, exp>{};

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// # of digit calculations
template <int depth, unsigned int i> struct NUM_DIGITS_CORE : NUM_DIGITS_CORE<depth + 1, i / 10>{};

template <int depth>
struct NUM_DIGITS_CORE<depth, 0>
{
    enum : int { val = depth};
};

template <int i> struct NUM_DIGITS : NUM_DIGITS_CORE<0, i>{};

template <>
struct NUM_DIGITS<0>
{
    enum : int { val = 1 };
};

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// Convert digit to character (1 -> '1')
template <int i>
struct DIGIT_TO_CHAR
{
    enum : char{ val = i + 48 };
};

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// Find the digit at a given offset into a number of the form 0000000017
template <unsigned int i, int place> // place -> [0 .. 10]
struct DIGIT_AT
{
    enum : char{ val = (i / POWER<10, place>::val) % 10 };
};

struct NULL_CHAR
{
    enum : char{ val = '\0' };
};

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// Convert the digit at a given offset into a number of the form '0000000017' to a character
template <unsigned int i, int place> // place -> [0 .. 9]
    struct ALT_CHAR : DIGIT_TO_CHAR< DIGIT_AT<i, place>::val >{};

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// Convert the digit at a given offset into a number of the form '17' to a character

// Template description, with specialization to generate null characters for out of range offsets
template <unsigned int i, int offset, int numDigits, bool inRange>  
    struct OFFSET_CHAR_CORE_CHECKED{};
template <unsigned int i, int offset, int numDigits>                
    struct OFFSET_CHAR_CORE_CHECKED<i, offset, numDigits, false> : NULL_CHAR{};
template <unsigned int i, int offset, int numDigits>                
    struct OFFSET_CHAR_CORE_CHECKED<i, offset, numDigits, true>  : ALT_CHAR<i, (numDigits - offset) - 1 >{};

// Perform the range check and pass it on
template <unsigned int i, int offset, int numDigits>
    struct OFFSET_CHAR_CORE : OFFSET_CHAR_CORE_CHECKED<i, offset, numDigits, offset < numDigits>{};

// Calc the number of digits and pass it on
template <unsigned int i, int offset>
    struct OFFSET_CHAR : OFFSET_CHAR_CORE<i, offset, NUM_DIGITS<i>::val>{};

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// Integer to char* template. Works on unsigned ints.
template <unsigned int i>
struct IntToStr
{
    const static char str[];
};

template <unsigned int i>
const char IntToStr<i>::str[] = 
{
    OFFSET_CHAR<i, 0>::val,
    OFFSET_CHAR<i, 1>::val,
    OFFSET_CHAR<i, 2>::val,
    OFFSET_CHAR<i, 3>::val,
    OFFSET_CHAR<i, 4>::val,
    OFFSET_CHAR<i, 5>::val,
    OFFSET_CHAR<i, 6>::val,
    OFFSET_CHAR<i, 7>::val,
    OFFSET_CHAR<i, 8>::val,
    OFFSET_CHAR<i, 9>::val,
    NULL_CHAR::val
};


///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// Tests
int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    std::wcout << IntToStr<17>::str << std::endl;
    std::wcout << IntToStr<173457>::str << std::endl;
    std::wcout << IntToStr< INT_MAX >::str << std::endl;
    std::wcout << IntToStr<0>::str << std::endl;
    std::wcout << IntToStr<1>::str << std::endl;
    std::wcout << IntToStr<-1>::str << std::endl;

    return 0;
}
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The OP's problem calls for an array with size that is at least proportional to the template argument value. I think that's impossible to do in portable standard C++ at the static init phase (although trivial at the dynamic init phase). But I could be wrong... :-) Cheers, –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 4 '10 at 20:51
    
@Alf in C++0x it's trivial to do for static init phase to. Too bad we are still in 2010! –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 4 '10 at 22:26
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No, but this is possible :

template < unsigned int i >
struct t {
  static std::string s;

  static std::string ConvertIntToString()
  {
    std::stringstream ss;
    ss << i;
    return ss.str();
  }
};

template< unsigned int i >
std::string t< i >::s = t<i>::ConvertIntToStr();

btw why are you using c strings? C++ has std::string class which is superior.

EDIT

I guess you could use template specialization :

template < unsigned int i >
struct t;

template <>
struct t<0>
{
  static const char * const s;
};
const char* const t<0>::s = "abc";

template <>
struct t<1>
{
  static const char * const s;
};
const char* const t<1>::s = "123";
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A solution at run-time is of course easy to find, but that was not my question; the point was the const. –  Thomas Nov 4 '10 at 11:39
    
And of course, I could initialize a std::string with the string constant, but first it has to be generated somehow! –  Thomas Nov 4 '10 at 11:40
    
Template specialization would not provide a general solution unless it is recursive (but then, I don't see a way to do the recursion, yet) –  Thomas Nov 4 '10 at 12:00
1  
If you initialize std::string with a string constant, you use all the benefits of compile time statics. The most important benefit of tha latter is that there is no static initialization fiasco for them. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 4 '10 at 20:03
    
@Johannes Schaub - litb I am avoiding class static members for that reason, and usually if I need such thing, I create a static function returning a reference, like this struct A{ static int& a(){ static int v=0; return v;} }; –  BЈовић Nov 4 '10 at 20:28
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Impossible.

Because the expansion of template is done at compile time when the compiler can only deal with constant value it knows. Any operation involving memory allocation(e.g. initializing a string) is not possible at this time but only at runtime.

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But the compiler knows the constant template value, and no (dynamic) memory allocation is necessary. –  Thomas Nov 4 '10 at 11:40
    
but it does not know the length char s, which must be *generated in memory. that's why string is not allowed as template parameter. –  t.g. Nov 4 '10 at 11:47
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The code you're presenting, ...

template < unsigned int i >
struct t {
  static const char *s;
};
static const char* t::s = ...;

... is invalid. t::s must have external linkage. Also, the definition needs to be templated.

Fixing the direct problems with the code, like ...

template < unsigned int i >
struct T
{
  static const char * const s;
};

template< unsigned i >
const char* const T<i>::s = ...;

... then initializing the T<i>::s with any desired string is trivial.

So, modulo the errors in your code, the answer is "yes, it's not only possible, it's trivial".

But why do you want this Rube Goldberg scheme to accomplish a trivial thing?

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You're right, the code should only demonstrate the idea, but it was invalid (with c++0x I could directly have written static const char *s = ...; inside the struct). I'll correct the code above. Still, I don't see how to initialize the string (and answer my question)! –  Thomas Nov 4 '10 at 11:56
    
@Thomas: After the = you can write any function call. That answers your original question. The additional question you've later posed in comments, how to do that at compile time, is a bit more tricky (if it is at all possible), but then your motivation for doing that is based on an invalid assumption about const requiring compile time evaluation. So, it helps to focus on the real problem to be solved (which you haven't even mentioned), not the vaguely and incorrectly perceived problems of vaguely perceived attempted solution. Cheers & hth., –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 4 '10 at 12:00
2  
@Vlad: sorry, none of what you write is meaningful. It's rubbish. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 4 '10 at 12:42
1  
@Vlad: please stop making nonsense comments. None of what you written so far makes any sense whatsoever. The things you say are impossible are trivial; the reasoning you present is invalid; so on, it's rubbish. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 4 '10 at 12:54
1  
@Vlad: please stop posting nonsense comments, nonsense claims, and nonsense challenges. I don't know what the f*** you're after, whether upmanship or dominance game or having others do your homework for you, but I won't. I'm just asking you, politely enough, to stop spewing nonsense and disinformation, please. TIA., –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 4 '10 at 14:59
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I'd think it might be doable with variadic templates. I don't have a compiler to test with, but I'd imagine something along the lines of this might work.

template < char ... RHS,  unsigned int i> 
struct t { 
    static const char s[] = t<' ', char(i+'0'), RHS, i-1>::s;
}; 

template <char ... RHS > 
struct t<RHS, 0> { 
    static const char s[] = {'0', RHS, '\0'};
}; 

void main() {
    std::cout << t<5>::s; // {'0',' ','1',' ','2',' ','3',' ','4',' ','5','\0'}
}
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This is not possible using template. But using stringstream, creating such string is trivial. Here is the pseudo code:

string makeit(int i)
{
    stringstream sstr;

    for (int x = 0; x < i-1; x++)
        put x and ' ' in sstr;
    put i in sstr;
    return sstr contents converted to string
}

More information about stringstream can be found here.

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