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I'm sure this is fairly trivial but I can't get it right.

public static string DoSomething(this Enum value)
 {
     if (!Enum.IsDefined(value.GetType(), value))
     {
         // not a valid value, assume default value
         value = default(value.GetType()); 
     }

     // ... do some other stuff
 }

The line value = default(value.GetType()); doesn't compile, but hopefully you can see what I'm attempting. I need to set the Enum param to the default value of it's own type.

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How can you even call this method without the 'value' being defined in the enum of the same type as 'value'? –  Paw Baltzersen Nov 4 '10 at 12:23
    
@Paw, that's the way enum works. You can store any int value in an int enum, whether it's defined or not. –  fearofawhackplanet Nov 4 '10 at 12:27
    
@fearofawhackplanet, I'm just trying to understand what you're trying to do. If you want to convert an int to an enum or maybe a string to an enum? –  Paw Baltzersen Nov 4 '10 at 12:30
    
no I'm querying the FieldInfo on the enum, which obviously throws an exception if the enum isn't defined. It makes sense I think to use the "default" FieldInfo in this case. –  fearofawhackplanet Nov 4 '10 at 12:33
1  
I think you may be considering "default value" to mean something different to what the compiler will use as a default for enumerations. The default value for an enumeration is always zero, even if there is no defined zero-value in your enum. From the spec "The default value of an enum E is the value produced by the expression (E)0." –  Jeff Yates Nov 4 '10 at 12:49
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5 Answers

I'm not really sure what you're trying to do here, but a version of the 'default' line which does compile is this:

 value = (Enum)Enum.GetValues(value.GetType()).GetValue(0);

Or, even cleaner (from Paw, in the comments, thanks):

 value = (Enum) Enum.ToObject(value.GetType(), 0);

This second version does only work properly if you know the enum's first element has a value of zero.

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or value = (Enum) Enum.ToObject(value.GetType(), 0); –  Paw Baltzersen Nov 4 '10 at 12:35
    
@paw What if you're using this: enum Foo{a=1,b=2}? +1 to Will though, it looks pretty robust –  Rob Fonseca-Ensor Nov 4 '10 at 12:40
    
@Paw: No. 0 isn’t a defined value for all enums. –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 4 '10 at 12:40
1  
@Konrad: That might be the case, but 0 is the default value for an enum, whether it is defined or not. It's what the compiler initializes enum variables to and one of the reasons why there is an FxCop error regarding a zero-value in enum definitions. From the spec, "The default value of an enum E is the value produced by the expression (E)0." –  Jeff Yates Nov 4 '10 at 12:47
1  
@Jeff, yes that's correct. It would be cooler to do it the 'proper' way, but in my case I don't care too much as all my enums have a NotSet = 0 value anyway. I got stuck because value = 0 doesn't work without a cast as you commented. –  fearofawhackplanet Nov 4 '10 at 13:07
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You actually could do what Paw is suggesting, even with a generic constraint, if you could move this method to its own class:

public abstract class Helper<T>
{
    public static string DoSomething<TEnum>(TEnum value) where TEnum: struct, T
    {
        if (!Enum.IsDefined(typeof(TEnum), value))
        {
            value = default(TEnum);
        }

        // ... do some other stuff

        // just to get code to compile
        return value.ToString();
    }
}

public class EnumHelper : Helper<Enum> { }

Then you would do, for example:

MyEnum x = MyEnum.SomeValue;
MyEnum y = (MyEnum)100; // Let's say this is undefined.

EnumHelper.DoSomething(x); // generic type of MyEnum can be inferred
EnumHelper.DoSomething(y); // same here

As Konrad Rudolph points out in a comment, default(TEnum) in the above code will evaluate to 0, regardless of whether or not a value is defined for 0 for the given TEnum type. If that's not what you want, Will's answer provides certainly the easiest way of getting the first defined value ((TEnum)Enum.GetValues(typeof(TEnum)).GetValue(0)).

On the other hand, if you want to take this to the extreme, and cache the result so that you don't always have to box it, you could do that:

public abstract class Helper<T>
{
    static Dictionary<Type, T> s_defaults = new Dictionary<Type, T>();

    public static string DoSomething<TEnum>(TEnum value) where TEnum: struct, T
    {
        if (!Enum.IsDefined(typeof(TEnum), value))
        {
            value = GetDefault<TEnum>();
        }

        // ... do some other stuff

        // just to get code to compile
        return value.ToString();
    }

    public static TEnum GetDefault<TEnum>() where TEnum : struct, T
    {
        T definedDefault;
        if (!s_defaults.TryGetValue(typeof(TEnum), out definedDefault))
        {
            // This is the only time you'll have to box the defined default.
            definedDefault = (T)Enum.GetValues(typeof(TEnum)).GetValue(0);
            s_defaults[typeof(TEnum)] = definedDefault;
        }

        // Every subsequent call to GetDefault on the same TEnum type
        // will unbox the same object.
        return (TEnum)definedDefault;
    }
}
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Your code doesn’t compile for me (Mono C#). –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 4 '10 at 12:50
    
@Konrad: That may be because I had a typo in it (TEnumvalue—no space). Also I didn't include a return value. I'd be curious to know if it does compile for Mono now that I updated the example. –  Dan Tao Nov 4 '10 at 12:57
    
I’d already corrected that, didn’t help. Weirdly, it now compiles (+1, elegant hack!) – but it has the same problem as the other solutions, namely that default really returns 0 which may be an undefined value in the actual enum and thus isn’t the right result. There’s the added problem that your solution no longer works as an extension method. –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 4 '10 at 13:00
    
@Konrad: Yeah, I realized that too shortly after posting (tested on an enum whose first defined value is 1), but I felt it was worth mentioning since it seems one of things the OP was trying to do was simply write default(TEnum). –  Dan Tao Nov 4 '10 at 13:03
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Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(ConsoleColor)) seems to work

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You need a hard cast for this. (ConsoleColor)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(ConsoleColor)) –  Paw Baltzersen Nov 4 '10 at 12:12
    
@Paw, how would you do that in fear's example (with a dynamic type) –  Rob Fonseca-Ensor Nov 4 '10 at 12:15
    
you can't, that's why I don't think it will work with Activator. –  Paw Baltzersen Nov 4 '10 at 12:16
    
replace typeof(ConsoleColor) with instanceValue.GetType() ... –  smartcaveman Nov 4 '10 at 12:45
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Enum by default have its first value as default value

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3  
again, how does this solve my problem? (and it's not even technically correct i don't think) –  fearofawhackplanet Nov 4 '10 at 12:20
2  
-1: Sorry, but the default value for every enum is 0, even if 0 is an invalid value for the enum. Try enum MyEnum { M1 = -1, M2 = 1 }; MyEnum e = default(MyEnum); ... Console.WriteLine("{0}", e); Writes 0 –  Binary Worrier Nov 4 '10 at 13:34
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Have you thought about making it a generic method?

public static string DoSomething<T>(Enum value)
{
    if (!Enum.IsDefined(typeof(T), value))
    {
        value = (T)Enum.ToObject(typeof(T), 0);
    }
    // ... do some other stuff
}

The caller of the method should know the type.

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3  
The where T : enum doesn’t exist in C#. :-( That’s the whole problem here. –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 4 '10 at 12:29
    
Ah true, removed that. –  Paw Baltzersen Nov 4 '10 at 12:32
    
Would still work though, without the 'where'. You'd just need try/catch to make sure your cast dosn't blow up. I'd throw a new exception to the caller if T wasn't an enum. –  Paw Baltzersen Nov 4 '10 at 12:37
    
So, if he doesn't know what the enum type is, how does he declare T? –  Caspar Kleijne Nov 4 '10 at 12:39
    
@Caspar, eeh, that's why I wrote "The caller of the method should know the type". If caller dosn't then this of course won't work. –  Paw Baltzersen Nov 4 '10 at 13:30
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