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What are the main possible reasons of breaking down a Maven project to sub-modules?

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Can you give us some context? –  Martijn Verburg Nov 4 '10 at 12:54

3 Answers 3

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Are you looking something more than the benefits of Modularization? The sub-modules should ideally be representing a single concept/feature so that they are functionally cohesive.

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  • Pom file inheritence You can use the and sections of the root poms to keep consistent version numbers and configurations across all child projects. So if I have an aggregator project that lists 300 projects, all that use apache commons-io and I want to upgrade them all the the latest version of commons-io, I can just change the version in the dependencyManagement section of the root pom. None of the child projects need specify a version.
  • build profiles In the above example, if I have 300 sub projects, an individual developer is probably not regularly working on all (or even many) of the 300 sub-projects. You can create a build profile that specifies only the modules you work on regularly, and if you have a continuous integration server that deploys artifacts to an artifact repository, you'll get all the changes the developers on your team make too, without having to build all 300 modules.
  • General organization/clarity
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While waiting for an answer to my comment.

  • A reason to split a Java EE based maven project into sub modules is so you can build the JAR/RAR/WAR/EAR/whatever independently of eachother.

  • For regular Java apps, you might split out the functionality into separate JARs, again each of these could be a sub-module under the overall project and again you can build them independently, run separate goals/phases/reports etc.

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