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I have a large form, in the end of the form a user is presented with a summary:

You have entered:
<table>
    <tr>
        <td>First name</td>
        <td><?php echo $firstname ?></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>Last name</td>
        <td><?php echo $lastname ?></td>
    </tr>
</table>

I first designed the summary page and now the thought came to me that it would be nice to send the user this page as a confirmation e-mail. What I have done now is this:

<?php $summarypage = "<table>
        <tr>
            <td>First name</td>
            <td>".$firstname."</td>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td>Last name</td>
            <td>".$lastname."</td>
        </tr>
    </table>";
echo $summarypage; ?>

For loops I use $summarypage .= "blabla"; within the loops.

When sending the e-mail I can just take $summarypage and attach it to my e-mail body. Beautiful.

Is what I am doing OK? It seems very "not elegant" to me.
Isn't $summarypage being rendered totally anew when I call it again in my e-mail - meaning all variables concatenated with it (e.g. $firstname) will be called again - performance hog?

Is there some kind of "buffer" I could just write the $summarypage variable to, so I have a plain-text variable afterwards? Would $newsummarypage = string($summarypage) do the trick?

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multiple good answers below –  Dennis G Nov 4 '10 at 13:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Ignore performance on that level, it won't matter. If the method you show works for you, use it.

An alternative that makes things a bit more readable (because you won't need PHP openers / closers) is HEREDOC:

<?php $summarypage = <<<EOT
<table>
 <tr>
  <td>First name</td>
  <td>$firstname</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
   <td>Last name</td>
   <td>$lastname</td>
  </tr>
</table>
EOT;
?>
share|improve this answer
    
I know about herodoc <<<, but can I work with variables in there? When I do $firstname it just outputs "$firstname". When I do <?php echo $firstname ?> it seems to just not be printed at all. –  Dennis G Nov 4 '10 at 12:52
2  
@moontear Huh? HEREDOC should replace variables. Are you sure $firstname is defined? –  Pekka 웃 Nov 4 '10 at 12:53
    
I left heredoc out of my answer, but I agree with @Pekka - it's a much easier way to deal with assigning large strings with other variables added into them. Check the manual page for heredoc, it's got it's own nuances. php.net/manual/en/… –  Surreal Dreams Nov 4 '10 at 12:57
    
Yeah I am sure, but maybe I didn't play with HERODOC enough (I quite like the concept). Should I do $firstname or <?php echo $firstname ?>` within the <<<blabla .... blabla;` block? –  Dennis G Nov 4 '10 at 12:57
2  
Just $firstname. No PHP commands go inside the heredoc block. –  Surreal Dreams Nov 4 '10 at 12:57

I think you are a bit confused about how strings/variables work in php. A little example might help

$s = "hello"; //stores the sequence 'h' 'e' 'l' 'l' 'o' in $s
$s = $s." world";//take the sequence stored in $s add the sequence ' world', 
                 //and store in $s again
echo $s; // prints 'hello world'. That is what $s contains, what $s is

$summary = "<div>".$firstname."</div>"; // take '<div>', lookup what $firstname
                 //contains and add that, then add '</div>' and then store this 
                 //new string thing('<div>Ishtar</div>') in $summary.

echo $summary; //$summary here knows nothing about $firstname, 
               //does not depend on it

All variables are evaluated when you use them. (Well, most of the time you use variables by evaluating them.)

share|improve this answer
    
A confused fella I am. Thank you, this explains a lot! –  Dennis G Nov 4 '10 at 13:29
    
@moontear - You're welcome! Oh, a little disclaimer: note that this is a simplistic view, technically this is not 100% correct. Ah well, so much more to learn :) –  Ishtar Nov 4 '10 at 13:37
    
As always... I read somewhere that using "." for concatenation is slower than doing "," - but I guess that only goes for echo, which takes multiple parameters. –  Dennis G Nov 4 '10 at 13:44
    
@moontear - Slower? You realize that you're talking about micro seconds here? Seriously, I couldn't care less and neither should you. Writing code that works is hard enough... –  Ishtar Nov 4 '10 at 14:33
    
Ok. Understood :-) –  Dennis G Nov 4 '10 at 14:45

$summarypage is a string, so it's just a bit of data assigned to a variable - a plain-text variable, as you said. Once the data is assigned to $summarypage, the work is done. You can happily write it out into pages, emails, databases and text files with no additional performance hits related to $summarypage.

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So, when I do echo $summarypage once on the page (all the variables within summarypage are iterated through), then afterwards I do a mail($to, $summarypage), so summarypage and all variables need to be evaluated AGAIN even though they didn't change since the last echo - or is the complete variable (with all "inside variables" evaluated) just held in memory? (That would be great) –  Dennis G Nov 4 '10 at 12:59
1  
The evaluated string is what is stored in memory. If you assign text into a string, the string is only evaluated at that time. Using that string again is only recalling the data you stored in it. No further evaluation is performed. It's just like a numeric value - assign 1 + 1 to a variable and PHP stores 2, not the equation 1 + 1. Assign "My name is $myName" to a string and you store "My name is Surreal Dreams". –  Surreal Dreams Nov 4 '10 at 13:08
    
"the string is only evaluated at that time" thank you! –  Dennis G Nov 4 '10 at 13:28

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