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I'm using NServiceBus in it's own process (so not using the Generic Host) and I would like to have multiple message handlers for a message in a specific order. For the Generic Host, you would implement ISpecifyMessageHandlerOrdering, but I don't know how to do this when hosting your own NServiceBus process since that interface is defined in NServiceBus.Host.exe and I haven't been able to find another way to do this.

The purpose of this is user authentication: before the actual message handler is invoked, I would first like to authenticate the sender of the message, which would happen in a different, more generic, message handler. The message will be of a type that contains the encrypted user name and password and/or a session ID. This type will be used for almost all commands sent to the server (everything but login I think). Is this an OK way to do user authentication using NServiceBus?

Currently, it picks up the second handler but not in the right order.

Update

As suggested by David I tried creating a IMessageModule and reading the headers from the CurrentMessageContext to authenticate the user.

I ran into some problems here:

  • The first time I send a message, the bus.CurrentMessageContext is null. Every time after that, it's filled in correctly and I can read the headers.
  • Calling bus.DoNotContinueDispatchingCurrentMessageToHandlers when the user is not authenticated does not stop the message handlers from being invoked. Neither does bus.Return(errorCode). Are there other ways I can do that?
share|improve this question
    
Out of curiosity why can't you use the Generic Host? –  Adam Fyles Nov 4 '10 at 17:51
    
To stop the message handlers from being invoked, I think you would need to throw some sort of NotAuthenticatedException. –  David Boike Nov 4 '10 at 18:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

As described in the NServiceBus FAQ on the documentation page:

http://www.nservicebus.com/Documentation.aspx

How do I specify the order in which handlers are invoked?

If you're writing your own host:

NServiceBus.Configure.With()
 ...
 .UnicastBus()
      .LoadMessageHandlers(First<H1>.Then<H2>().AndThen<H3>().AndThen<H4>() //etc)
 ...

If you're using the generic host

public class EndpointConfig : IConfigureThisEndpoint, ISpecifyMessageHandlerOrdering
{
     public void SpecifyOrder(Order order)
     {
          order.Specify(First<H1>.Then<H2>().AndThen<H3>().AndThen<H4>() //etc);
     }
}

If you only want to specify a single handler (with your own host)

NServiceBus.Configure.With()
     ...
     .UnicastBus()
          .LoadMessageHandlers<FIRST<YourHandler>>()
     ...

If you only want to specify a single handler (with the generic host)

public class EndpointConfig : IConfigureThisEndpoint, ISpecifyMessageHandlerOrdering
{
     public void SpecifyOrder(Order order)
     {
          order.Specify<FIRST<YourHandler>>();
     }
}
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Excellent, I had searched through the documentation contents, but not the FAQ. May I ask what your opinion is on the best way to do user authentication? As I see it, I have three options: multiple message handlers (what this question is about), the IMessageModule as suggested by David (which gave me some trouble) or the wrapper as suggested by Adam Fyles (which I haven't tried yet). It would seem that multiple handlers has some overhead to it. –  JulianR Nov 4 '10 at 19:24
    
NServiceBus by default sets the Windows Identity of the thread to that of the domain user who sent the message - this is called impersonation. Once you have that, you can authenticate based on that data. If you're looking for authorization, then look at including claims in the headers sent along with a message. –  Udi Dahan Nov 4 '10 at 20:34
    
I've looked at the source, and it seems the First class really is just a neat way to construct a list of Types. I'd like to do that myself and pass it in, but how would I do that? –  Neil Barnwell Mar 1 '13 at 14:19
    
@NeilBarnwell we don't currently support that - but would welcome a pull request :) –  Udi Dahan Mar 1 '13 at 14:48
    
Sure I'll take a look. Seems like just making ConfigUnicastBus.LoadMessageHandlers(IEnumerable<Type> orderedTypes) public, tbh? –  Neil Barnwell Mar 1 '13 at 17:10

Another possibility would be to implement a base message handler class that would conditionally skip the handling based on your authentication check.

public abstract class MessageHandlerBase<T> : IMessageHandler<T> where T : IMessage
{
    public abstract void HandleMessage(T message);

    public void Handle(T message)
    {

        if (CredentialsValid(message))
            this.HandleMessage(message);

    }
}
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Creative, I like :) –  JulianR Nov 4 '10 at 19:02

Have you considered a message module for this purpose?

public interface IMessageModule
{
    // Methods
    void HandleBeginMessage();
    void HandleEndMessage();
    void HandleError();
}

Implementing this interface gives you a point to have code called before and after every message. If you inject an IBus, you can access the current message context, and from there inspect headers and use that to authenticate your messages.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, I had indeed considered using this, but I had not thought of accessing the current message context. I will look into this, thanks! :) –  keepitstupid Nov 4 '10 at 14:14
    
Hey, I tried your suggestion and came a long way, but not quite. Please see my edit. –  keepitstupid Nov 4 '10 at 17:20
    
And sorry, I can't upvote with this account. Weird that you can't always upvote answers to your own questions. –  keepitstupid Nov 4 '10 at 17:26

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