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I should find out an index of an item from a list of words. The function:

def index(lst_words, word):

should return the index of word in lst_words. e.g.

>>> index (['how, 'to', 'find'], ['how'])

shoud return 0 why this one doesn't work for me?

def index (lst_words, word):
    find = lst_words.index(word)
    return find
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
>>> def index(lst_words, word):
       find = lst_words.index(word)
       return find

>>> x = ['hello', 'foo', 'bar']
>>> index(x, 'bar')
2

This is what you probably meant. When you want to find the position of bar, you pass bar as a string parameter, not a list. Cause the list you have, is a list of strings.

The difference is:

>>> x = ['bar']
>>> type(x)
<type 'list'>
>>> x = 'bar'
>>> type(x)
<type 'str'>

So what you are trying to do, will work if the element within the list was another list.

>>> x = ['hello', 'foo', ['bar']]
>>> index(x, ['bar'])         # since bar is a list not a string
2
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You probably meant

['how', 'to', 'find'].index('how').

NOT

['how', 'to', 'find'].index(['how'])

This is not searching for a string, it's searching for a list. It would have matched

['how', 'to', 'find', ['how']].index(['how'])

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I'm sorry but no, the result whoud be exactly like index (['how, 'to', 'find'], ['how'])' –  Gusto Nov 4 '10 at 13:23
1  
@Gusto: The result should be 0, which is what this code returns. –  MAK Nov 4 '10 at 13:43
    
Maybe if you'd said [['how'], 'to', 'find'].index(['how']) would work and return 0, the OP would understand better. –  martineau Nov 4 '10 at 17:33

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