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I have a problem. My program is using config file to set options, and one of those options is a tuple. Here's what i mean:

[common]
logfile=log.txt
db_host=localhost
db_user=root
db_pass=password
folder[1]=/home/scorpil
folder[2]=/media/sda5/
folder[3]=/media/sdb5/

etc... Can i parse this into tuple with ConfigParser module in Python? Is there some easy way to do this?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

if you can change config format like this:

folder = /home/scorpil
         /media/sda5/
         /media/sdb5/

then in python:

config.get("common", "folder").split("\n")
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Your config could be:

[common]
logfile=log.txt
db_host=localhost
db_user=root
db_pass=password
folder = ("/home/scorpil", "/media/sda5/", "/media/sdb5/")

Assuming that you have config in a file named foo.cfg, you can do the following:

import ConfigParser
cp = ConfigParser.ConfigParser()
cp.read("foo.cfg")
folder = eval(cp.get("common", "folder"), {}, {})

print folder
print type(folder)

which should produce:

('/home/scorpil', '/media/sda5/', '/media/sdb5/')
<type 'tuple'>

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have a point, this helped me out –  cacois Mar 23 '12 at 20:01
2  
eval() solution is not good, generally speaking. –  mehaase May 18 '12 at 23:02
    
I would agree that in general eval() is not good. In the case where you control the input, and restrict the execution environment it is an acceptable solution. –  John Percival Hackworth May 20 '12 at 16:30
    
eval() is evil ;) –  nandinga Apr 29 '13 at 14:30
    
Evil no, gobsmackingly dangerous yes. The key to safer use of eval() is to ensure that you have specified the global and local parameters to eval(). See docs.python.org/2/library/functions.html#eval for more details. –  John Percival Hackworth Apr 29 '13 at 15:47

You can get the items list and use a list comprehension to create a list of all the items which name starts with a defined prefix, in your case folder

folders = tuple([ item[1] for item in configparser.items() if item[0].startswith("folder")])
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This solution assumes that the entries in the file are in the proper order. –  Terrel Shumway Nov 4 '10 at 14:51
    
@Terrel Shumway is does but you could always sort the items beforehand. –  Rod Nov 4 '10 at 15:46
    
sorting beforehand won't help: folder[10] < folder[2] –  Terrel Shumway Nov 4 '10 at 21:26
#!/usr/bin/env python
sample = """
[common]
logfile=log.txt
db_host=localhost
db_user=root
db_pass=password
folder[1]=/home/scorpil
folder[2]=/media/sda5/
folder[3]=/media/sdb5/
"""
from cStringIO import StringIO
import ConfigParser
import re
FOLDER_MATCH = re.compile(r"folder\[(\d+)\]$").match

def read_list(items,pmatch=FOLDER_MATCH):
    if not hasattr(pmatch,"__call__"):
        pmatch = re.compile(pmatch).match
    folder_list = []
    for k,v in items:
        m = pmatch(k)
        if m:
            folder_list.append((int(m.group(1)),v))
    return tuple( kv[1] for kv in sorted(folder_list) )


if __name__ == '__main__':
    cp = ConfigParser.SafeConfigParser()
    cp.readfp(StringIO(sample),"sample")

    print read_list(cp.items("common"))
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I don't know ConfigParser, but you can easily read it into a list (perhaps using .append()) and then do myTuple = tuple(myList)

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