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I'm relatively new to the whole WPF and MVVM idea and I'm looking for advice on a best practice. I have a solution that works but it feels like I might be missing some great XAML syntax that would simplify the whole thing.

I have a string field in a database table that is stored as a CSV, e.g. "CAT, DOG". Perhaps I should have done this as a many-to-many relationship in my entity data model, but that is a different best practice discussion.

In my XAML, I am using a multibinding on a ListBox that contains CheckBoxes. The domain of possible choices is determined at runtime and the ListBox generates CheckBoxes using a DataTemplate. Here's the XAML:

    <ListBox Grid.Column="3" Grid.Row="8" Grid.RowSpan="2" Name="brandedProductsListBox" Margin="3" ItemsSource="{Binding Source={StaticResource brandedProductLookup}}" IsSynchronizedWithCurrentItem="True" TabIndex="475">
    <ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
        <DataTemplate>
            <CheckBox Margin="3" Content="{Binding Path=BrandedProductName}" Checked="CheckBox_Checked" Unchecked="CheckBox_Unchecked">
                <CheckBox.IsChecked>
                    <MultiBinding Converter="{StaticResource brandedProductToBoolean}">
                        <Binding Source="{StaticResource projectsView}" Path="BrandedProducts" />
                        <Binding Path="BrandedProductName" />
                    </MultiBinding>
                </CheckBox.IsChecked>
            </CheckBox>
        </DataTemplate>
    </ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
</ListBox>

I use a converter to check the appropriate CheckBoxes. I tried to get the ConvertBack method of the converter to turn a boolean into my CSV string, but I couldn't figure out how to get access which BrandedProductName when all I was passed was a boolean. Here's the converter:

public class BrandedProductToBooleanConverter : IMultiValueConverter
{
    public object Convert(object[] value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        if (value == null) {
            return false;
        }
        else {
            // The bindings passed in (in order) are: the BrandedProducts field for the current project, 
            // and the Branded Product represented by the current CheckBox.
            string brandedProducts = value[0] as string;
            string brandedProduct = value[1] as string;
            return brandedProducts == null ? false :  brandedProducts.Contains(brandedProduct);
        }
    }

    public object[] ConvertBack(object value, Type[] targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        return null;
    }
}

So Convert properly checks the right CheckBoxes when an entity is selected, but when adding a new one I figured out I could use the Checked and UnChecked event handlers of the CheckBox to write back to my entity, like so:

        private void CheckBox_Checked(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (projectView.IsAddingNew) {
            CheckBox checkBox = sender as CheckBox;
            NewProject project = projectView.CurrentAddItem as NewProject;
            if (project.BrandedProducts == null) {
                project.BrandedProducts = (string)checkBox.Content;
            }
            else {
                project.BrandedProducts += ", " + (string)checkBox.Content;
            }
        }
        e.Handled = true;
    }

    private void CheckBox_Unchecked(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (projectView.IsAddingNew) {
            CheckBox checkBox = sender as CheckBox;
            NewProject project = projectView.CurrentAddItem as NewProject;
            if (project.BrandedProducts != null) {
                project.BrandedProducts = project.BrandedProducts.Replace((string)checkBox.Content + ", ", "").Replace(", " + (string)checkBox.Content, "");
            }
        }
        e.Handled = true;
    }

If you're still with me, the question is what is a better way to do this? It feels a bit like apples and oranges with me using a converter to generate the view from the entity but then using event handlers to translate view updates/commands back to the entity. Does it violate some goal of MVVM to use event handlers to modify my ViewModel this way?

Thanks in advance for any suggestions, Ray

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1 Answer 1

Ray,

If you're still with me, the question is what is a better way to do this?

I've found that with WPF, if you're asking this question, there probably is a better way. There are just so many options (compared to wimpy WinForms).

Does it violate some goal of MVVM to use event handlers to modify my ViewModel this way?

IMHO, yes, it does violate MVVM. You should have no ViewModel code (besides setting up a ViewModel Binding) in your code-behind.

You should have your events execute ICommand(s) which are exposed by your ViewModel (i.e. Add, Remove). See the EventToCommand which would probably apply to your CheckBox_Checked and CheckBox_UnChecked events.

-jberger

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