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In Java, arrays don't override toString(), so if you try to print one directly, you get weird output including the memory location:

int[] intArray = new int[] {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
System.out.println(intArray);     // prints something like '[I@3343c8b3'

But usually we'd actually want something more like [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]. What's the simplest way of doing that? Here are some example inputs and outputs:

// array of primitives:
int[] intArray = new int[] {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
//output: [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

// array of object references:
String[] strArray = new String[] {"John", "Mary", "Bob"};
//output: [John, Mary, Bob]
share|improve this question
1  
What do you want the representation to be for objects other than strings? The result of calling toString? In quotes or not? –  Jon Skeet Jan 3 '09 at 20:41
1  
Yes objects would be represented by their toString() method and without quotes (just edited the example output). –  Alex Spurling Jan 3 '09 at 20:42
    
String[] strArray = new String[] { "John", "Mary", "Bob" }; System.out.println(ReflectionToStringBuilder.toString(strArray, ToStringStyle.SIMPLE_STYLE)); System.out.println(ToStringBuilder.reflectionToString(strArray, ToStringStyle.SIMPLE_STYLE)); System.out.println(Arrays.toString(strArray)); System.out.println(Arrays.deepToString(strArray)); –  user2323036 Mar 10 at 10:43

13 Answers 13

up vote 704 down vote accepted

In Java 5 Arrays.toString(arr) or Arrays.deepToString(arr) for arrays within arrays. and add Note that Object[] version calls .toString() of each object in array. If my memory serves me correct, the output is even decorated in the exact way you're asking.

Edit: Don't forget to add import java.util.Arrays; like this:

package packageName;
import java.util.Arrays;
...
share|improve this answer
4  
I did actually check before posting that does Google find that info easily: It didn't since Google has a preference for Java 1.4.2 apidocs for some reason and like I said, this is in Java 5. –  Esko Jan 3 '09 at 20:55
    
yes, this is the fastest way to print an array of string without writing loop ;) –  anticafe Apr 7 '11 at 4:48
1  
String[] strArray = new String[] { "John", "Mary", "Bob" }; System.out.println(ReflectionToStringBuilder.toString(strArray, ToStringStyle.SIMPLE_STYLE)); System.out.println(ToStringBuilder.reflectionToString(strArray, ToStringStyle.SIMPLE_STYLE)); System.out.println(Arrays.toString(strArray)); System.out.println(Arrays.deepToString(strArray)); –  user2323036 Mar 10 at 10:44

To add to all the answers, printing the object as a JSON string is also an option.

Using Jackson:

ObjectWriter ow = new ObjectMapper().writer().withDefaultPrettyPrinter();
System.out.println(ow.writeValueAsString(anyArray));

Using Gson:

Gson gson = new Gson();
System.out.println(gson.toJson(anyArray));
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for(int n: someArray) {
    System.out.println(n+" ");
}
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2  
This way you end up with an empty space ;) –  Matthias Sep 21 at 9:23

public class printer {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String a[] = new String[4];
    Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
    System.out.println("enter the data");
    for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
        a[i] = sc.nextLine();
    }
    System.out.println("the entered data is");
    for (String i : a) {
        System.out.println(i);
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer

There are several ways one can print an array in java.

-** First one is using Arrays.toString(name of the array)

code example:

               int[] intArray = new int[] {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
               System.out.println(Arrays.toString(intArray));

-**We can also use Arrays.asList(name of the array)

code example:

               int[] intArray = new int[] {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
               System.out.println(Arrays.asList(intArray));
  • We can print an array using foreach loop.

    code example:

               int[] intArray = new int[] {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
               for(int array : intArray)
                 {
                      System.out.println(array);
    
  • Using simple for loop.

    code example:

               int[] intArray = new int[] {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
               for(int i=0; i<intArray.length/2; i++)
                {
                    System.out.println(intArray[i]);
                }
    
  • One can also use user defined function if want to formatted the output in his own way...

    I hope this will working..Happy coding.

** Don't forget to add the Java Library Package in following way..

               import java.util.Arrays;
share|improve this answer

There's one additional way if your array is of type char[]:

char A[] = {'a', 'b', 'c'}; 

System.out.println(A); // no other arguments

prints

abc
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This does the job.

int [] list = {22,55,66,11,32,56,67,89,95,10};

// print for each number a comma separated  
for (int x: list )
    System.out.print(x + ",");
share|improve this answer
13  
But wouldn't this print a comma after the last element? –  Jake Byman Aug 3 '13 at 1:41
    
This answer is essentially the same as a previous one with a different delimiter. Do you have anything other to offer? –  MichaelT Dec 16 at 4:53

In JDK1.8 you can use aggregate operations and a lambda expression:

String[] strArray = new String[] {"John", "Mary", "Bob"};

Arrays.asList(strArray).stream().forEach(s -> System.out.println(s));

/* output:
John
Mary
Bob
*/
share|improve this answer
9  
Or less cumbersome, Arrays.stream(strArray).forEach(System.out::println); –  ZouZou May 22 at 22:01
    
+1 for using lambda yet can you edit your answer that supports 2D array too. –  Kick Buttowski Jul 18 at 19:15
1  
This is clumsy. It should be System.out::println which is a Java 8 method reference. You code produces an unnecessary lambda. –  Boris the Spider Sep 20 at 9:11

Using regular for loop is the simplest way of printing array in my opinion. Here you have a sample code based on your intArray

for (int i = 0; i < intArray.length; i++) {
   System.out.print(intArray[i] + ", ");
}

It gives output as yours 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

share|improve this answer
3  
It prints "1, 2, 3, 4, 5, " as output, it prints comma after the last element too. –  icza Mar 10 at 11:32
    
What's the solution for not having a comma after the last element? –  Mona Jalal Jun 16 at 1:48
1  
You could replace the code within the loop with System.out.print(intArray[i]); if(i != intArray.length - 1) System.out.print(", "); –  Nepoxx Jul 16 at 17:39

Arrays.deepToString(arr) only prints on one line.

int[][] table = new int[2][2];

To actually get a table to print as a two dimensional table, I had to do this:

System.out.println(Arrays.deepToString(table).replaceAll("],", "],\r\n"));

It seems like the Arrays.deepToString(arr) method should take a separator string, but unfortunately it doesn't.

share|improve this answer
1  
Maybe use System.getProperty("line.separator"); instead of \r\n so it is right for non-Windows as well. –  Scooter Dec 21 '13 at 22:01

This is nice to know, however, as for "always check the standard libraries first" I'd never have stumbled upon the trick of Arrays.toString( myarray )

--since I was concentrating on the type of myarray to see how to do this. I didn't want to have to iterate through the thing: I wanted an easy call to make it come out similar to what I see in the Eclipse debugger and myarray.toString() just wasn't doing it.

import java.util.Arrays;
.
.
.
System.out.println( Arrays.toString( myarray ) );
share|improve this answer

Always check the standard libraries first. Try:

System.out.println(Arrays.toString(array));

or if your array contains other arrays as elements:

System.out.println(Arrays.deepToString(array));
share|improve this answer

If you're using Java 1.4, you can instead do:

System.out.println(Arrays.asList(array));

(This works in 1.5+ too, of course.)

share|improve this answer
20  
Unfortunately this only works with arrays of objects, not arrays of primitives. –  Alex Spurling Jan 3 '09 at 21:57

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