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I know that you generally initialize a static member variable from within a .cpp file. But my question is: why do you have to?

Here's an example:

#include <vector>

using namespace std;

class A {
    public:
        static vector<int> x;
};

main() {
    int sz = A::x.size();
}

This gives a compiler error: undefined reference to 'A::x'

However, this:

#include <vector>

using namespace std;

class A {
    public:
        static vector<int> x;
};

// Initialize static member
vector<int> A::x;

main() {
    int sz = A::x.size();
}

compiles and runs fine.

I can understand if I was initializing the vector using something other than the default constructor, but I'm not. I just want a vector of size 0 created. Surely, any static members will have to be allocated memory on program initialization, so why doesn't the compiler just use the default constructor?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

That's not about initialization, it's about definition. Or more precisely : it's about knowing which compilation unit (.cpp) will hold the object (that have to be uniquely defined SOMEWHERE)

So, what's needed is simply to put the definition somewhere, in a unique place, that is a cpp, to let the compiler know that when the class's static object is called, it's defined there and nowhere else. (if you try to define your static in a header, each cpp including this header will have a definition, making impossible to know where it should be defined - and manually initialized if it's required for you use) .

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2  
+1 but you should delete one of the dups. For objects, RAII makes initialization (even if only by default constructor) a consequence of definition. Does this work for raw pointers, builtin types like int? –  Steve Townsend Nov 4 '10 at 15:30
    
I meant that you can add the initialization there if you want. I'll add the precision. –  Klaim Nov 4 '10 at 15:45
    
@Steve POD type constructors are syntactical only, so yes it does work, but it doesn't actually do anything (or to be even more precise, it is allowed to do nothing - by the C++ standard). –  Let_Me_Be Nov 4 '10 at 19:06
    
Thanks, that makes a lot of sense now. I guess I got caught up with thinking that the declaration in the header file was enough to reserve the memory. But of course it can't be, because a header file is included in many object files. It makes sense that you have to explicitly state which object file will allocate the memory by giving the static definition in one .cpp file. –  Lee Netherton Nov 8 '10 at 12:12
    
It might still be strange when coming from other languages, because the reason is relative to an old file-compilation-unit system. Not sure it will be kept in the next decade. There seem to be a lot of interest in a module-based system for C++15-16 or later. –  Klaim Nov 8 '10 at 12:15

You are looking at it from the point of a single compilation unit.

But the language has to assume there can potentially by multiple compilation units. So now in which compilation unit is the static object created? Basically the compiler is not allowed to make that decision and the engineer must make the decision.

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undefined reference to 'A::x' isn't a compiler error; it's a linker error. It means that a definition of A::x can't be found in any of the translation units that are being linked together to form your program. Static member variables have external linkage and must be defined in exactly one translation unit. Anything with external linkage will not have a definition generated by the compiler unless you write one.

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What you call initialization is definition. You need to define the static member somewhere. The part inside the class is just a declaration.

This is mostly because having a definition inside the header would cause huge problems (since you couldn't include that header into more then one translation unit without causing multiple definitions).

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