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Here is the code:

class LongOp
{
    //The delegate
    Action longOpDelegate = LongOp.DoLongOp;
    //The result
    string longOpResult = null;

    //The Main Method
    public string CallLongOp()
    {
        //Call the asynchronous operation
        IAsyncResult result = longOpDelegate.BeginInvoke(Callback, null);

        //Wait for it to complete
        result.AsyncWaitHandle.WaitOne();

        //return result saved in Callback
        return longOpResult;
    }

    //The long operation
    static void DoLongOp()
    {
        Thread.Sleep(5000);
    }

    //The Callback
    void Callback(IAsyncResult result)
    {
        longOpResult = "Completed";
        this.longOpDelegate.EndInvoke(result);
    }
}

Here is the test case:

[TestMethod]
public void TestBeginInvoke()
{
    var longOp = new LongOp();
    var result = longOp.CallLongOp();

    //This can fail
    Assert.IsNotNull(result);
}

If this is run the test case can fail. Why exactly?

There is very little documentation on how delegate.BeginInvoke works. Does anyone have any insights they would like to share?

Update This is a subtle race-condition that is not well documented in MSDN or elsewhere. The problem, as explained in the accepted answer, is that when the operation completes the Wait Handle is signalled, and then the Callback is executed. The signal releases the waiting main thread and now the Callback execution enters the "race". Jeffry Richter's suggested implementation shows what's happening behind the scenes:

  // If the event exists, set it   
  if (m_AsyncWaitHandle != null) m_AsyncWaitHandle.Set();

  // If a callback method was set, call it  
  if (m_AsyncCallback != null) m_AsyncCallback(this);

For a solution refer to Ben Voigt's answer. That implementation does not incur the additional overhead of a second wait handle.

share|improve this question
    
Remove the callback and try again. –  jgauffin Nov 4 '10 at 17:22
    
@jgauffin, if you notice the question is not asking "How do I get this to work?" Clearly this is a contrived example. –  Noel Abrahams Nov 4 '10 at 17:39
    
Your question is: "If this is run the test case can fail. Why exactly?". I did answer that. Because you try to mix two very different ways of handling an async operation. –  jgauffin Nov 4 '10 at 17:57
    
It depends on the Sleep() argument? I'm not buying. Post a repro that anybody can try to run on their machine without a test runner. –  Hans Passant Nov 4 '10 at 18:04
    
@Hans, you can just try var longOp = new LongOp(); anywhere you like. But you must know that?! –  Noel Abrahams Nov 4 '10 at 18:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The ASyncWaitHandle.WaitOne() is signaled when the asynchronous operation completes. At the same time CallBack() is called.

This means that the the code after WaitOne() is run in the main thread and the CallBack is run in another thread (probably the same that runs DoLongOp()). This results in a race condition where the value of longOpResult essentially is unknown at the time it is returned.

One could have expected that ASyncWaitHandle.WaitOne() would have been signaled when the CallBack was finished, but that is just not how it works ;-)

You'll need another ManualResetEvent to have the main thread wait for the CallBack to set longOpResult.

share|improve this answer

As others have said, result.WaitOne just means that the target of BeginInvoke has finished, and not the callback. So just put the post-processing code into the BeginInvoke delegate.

    //Call the asynchronous operation
    Action callAndProcess = delegate { longOpDelegate(); Callafter(); };
    IAsyncResult result = callAndProcess.BeginInvoke(r => callAndProcess.EndInvoke(r), null);


    //Wait for it to complete
    result.AsyncWaitHandle.WaitOne();

    //return result saved in Callafter
    return longOpResult;
share|improve this answer
    
Ok... very nice solution indeed! But for an explanation of why I think I've covered that pretty well. –  badbod99 Nov 4 '10 at 21:34
    
It's clever but when would this actually be useful? ManualReset gives you control to wait whenever you want to wait, this calls the operation then a callback to handle the result and waits for both at once. You could just handle the result in the operation itself if that is what you wanted. –  badbod99 Nov 4 '10 at 21:56
    
@badbod99: This allows you to handle the result even if you didn't write the function stuffed into longOpDelegate (or it's a method of another class, and doesn't have access to the private 'longOpResult` member, or you don't want to introduce reverse coupling, or ...). –  Ben Voigt Nov 5 '10 at 1:21
    
Good point, if you don't have access to the code of the longop method, this is miles better. I'll leave my snippet in place though as an example of manualreset since so many have mentioned it. –  badbod99 Nov 5 '10 at 7:38
    
@Ben, thanks. But then we are saying the IAsyncResult returned by BeginInvoke is completely useless and in fact should come with a warning "DO NOT USE!", no? –  Noel Abrahams Nov 5 '10 at 8:41

What is happening

Since your operation DoLongOp has completed, control resumes within CallLongOp and the function completes before the Callback operation has completed. Assert.IsNotNull(result); then executes before longOpResult = "Completed";.

Why? AsyncWaitHandle.WaitOne() will only wait for your async operation to complete, not your Callback

The callback parameter of BeginInvoke is actually an AsyncCallback delegate, which means your callback is called asynchronously. This is by design, as the purpose is to process the operation results asynchronously (and is the whole purpose of this callback parameter).

Since the BeginInvoke function actually calls your Callback function the IAsyncResult.WaitOne call is just for the operation and does not influence the callback.

See the Microsoft documentation (section Executing a Callback Method When an Asynchronous Call Completes). There is also a good explanation and example.

If the thread that initiates the asynchronous call does not need to be the thread that processes the results, you can execute a callback method when the call completes. The callback method is executed on a ThreadPool thread.

Solution

If you want to wait for both the operation and the callback, you need to handle the signalling yourself. A ManualReset is one way of doing it which certainly gives you the most control (and it's how Microsoft has done it in their docs).

Here is amended code using ManualResetEvent.

public class LongOp
{
    //The delegate
    Action longOpDelegate = LongOp.DoLongOp;
    //The result
    public string longOpResult = null;

    // Declare a manual reset at module level so it can be 
    // handled from both your callback and your called method
    ManualResetEvent waiter;

    //The Main Method
    public string CallLongOp()
    {
        // Set a manual reset which you can reset within your callback
        waiter = new ManualResetEvent(false);

        //Call the asynchronous operation
        IAsyncResult result = longOpDelegate.BeginInvoke(Callback, null);    

        // Wait
        waiter.WaitOne();

        //return result saved in Callback
        return longOpResult;
    }

    //The long operation
    static void DoLongOp()
    {
        Thread.Sleep(5000);
    }

    //The Callback
    void Callback(IAsyncResult result)
    {
        longOpResult = "Completed";
        this.longOpDelegate.EndInvoke(result);

        waiter.Set();
    }
}

For the example you have given, you would be better not using a callback and instead handling the result in your CallLongOp function, in which case your WaitOne on the operation delegate will work fine.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the response. So what exactly do we do with the IAsyncResult that we get from BeginInvoke()? –  Noel Abrahams Nov 4 '10 at 18:27
    
You can use it to halt execution in the method that called begininvoke. I.e. Any scenario where you want to wait for the operation itself to complete. –  badbod99 Nov 4 '10 at 18:39
    
RACE CONDITION! You'd better create the event before calling BeginInvoke, but adding more synchronization objects is unnecessary and inefficient. –  Ben Voigt Nov 4 '10 at 21:23
    
@Ben - Fixed (but it was a minor fix and the downvote was harsh!). Usual a ManualResetEvent is the way it's done in the documentation. Do you have a better way of synchronising the callback? –  badbod99 Nov 4 '10 at 21:29

The callback is executed after the CallLongOp method. Since you only set the variable value in the callback, it stands to reason that it would be null. Read this :link text

share|improve this answer
    
That is to say, the result that you are looking for has not yet been set as the callback si not called until after the CallLongOp method returns. –  Kell Nov 4 '10 at 17:44
    
thanks for your reponse. The callback is not always executed after the CallLongOp method. Try putting Thread.Sleep(500); in CallLongOp before return longOpResult; and the test will pass. –  Noel Abrahams Nov 4 '10 at 17:47

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