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Here's the function I'm using to generate random salts:

function generateRandomString($nbLetters){
    $randString="";
    $charUniverse="abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ0123456789";
    for($i=0; $i<$nbLetters; $i++){
       $randInt=rand(0,61);
        $randChar=$charUniverse[$randInt];
        $randString=$randomString.$randChar;
    }
    return $randomString;
}

This is for a non commercial website. It's only used to generate the salt (to be stored in the db and used along with the user submitted pw for hashing).

Is this appropriate? Should I use a larger subset of characters, and if so is there an easy way to do that in PHP?

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10 Answers 10

up vote 18 down vote accepted

From the php sha1 page:

$salt = uniqid(mt_rand(), true);

This looks simpler, and more effective (since each is unique) than what you have proposed.

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10  
You could argue that it's less unique... uniqid produces a string which is based on the clock. And it only returns 23 hex characters (plus one to 10 decimal characters for the mt_rand call). So that brings your total entropy up to a max of 33 hexbits (or 132 bits of entropy) (as low as 24 hexbits or 96 bits). The OP's function yields about 6 bits of entropy per character (so putting in 40 as the parameter will give about 240 bits of entropy)... So the uniqid solution is actually less effective in the long run... (But it's much simpler and may indeed be "good enough")... –  ircmaxell Nov 4 '10 at 17:49
2  
Non-commercial so I'd say more than good enough, the trade off in simplicity is worth it in this case. –  Tom Medley Nov 4 '10 at 20:56
3  
If the problem is only one of string length, nothing would prevent me from running the function twice, for example. –  JDelage Nov 5 '10 at 13:52
1  
@ircmaxell I agree, Although having a base256 (full byte) salt is much more preferred because alpha-numeric rainbow tables are very common. For this reason I like kijin's answer. Although rainbow tables generated for this size of salt+password are very uncommon. –  rook Nov 7 '10 at 22:08
2  
WARNING: From the php documentation: php.net/manual/en/function.uniqid.php This function does not create random nor unpredictable strings. This function must not be used for security purposes. Use a cryptographically secure random function/generator and cryptographically secure hash functions to create unpredictable secure IDs. –  Kenny Wyland Jun 14 '14 at 20:59

If you're on Linux, /dev/urandom is probably your best source of randomness. It's supplied by the OS itself, so it's guaranteed to be much more reliable than any PHP built-in function.

$fp = fopen('/dev/urandom', 'r');
$randomString = fread($fp, 32);
fclose($fp);

This will give you 32 bytes of random blob. You'll probably want to pass this through something like base64_encode() to make it legible. No need to juggle characters yourself.

Edit 2014: In PHP 5.3 and above, openssl_random_pseudo_bytes() is the easiest way to get a bunch of random bytes. On *nix systems, it uses /dev/urandom behind the scenes. On Windows systems, it uses a different algorithm that is built into the OpenSSL library.

Related: https://security.stackexchange.com/questions/26206

Related: should i use urandom or openssl_random_pseudo_bytes?

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I agree with this. The OP is using a non cryptographic secure pseudorandom generator. I'd only add that the salt can be stored as a binary in the DB to reduce base64 encode/decode latency since the hash should be transparent to the authentication login. Also, if the server is IIS/Win32 the mcrypt_create_iv() function, if available, will pool the win32 cryptoAPI should you need good random bits in that scenario and not want to deal with COM interfacing (CAPICOM or whatever). Since the OP asked about a random salt I think @kijin answer is the best solution. –  DrPerdix Nov 4 '10 at 18:59
    
+1 this is the best answer on this page, Although i would not do a base64_encode. Keep in mind all message digest functions are binary safe, and you want a full byte salt, alpha-numeric rainbow tables are very common, but base256 rainbowtables are unheard of. –  rook Nov 7 '10 at 22:10
    
@Rook Sure, you can pass any binary string to a hash function. But the salt is usually also stored along with the hash. (How else are you going to compare the hash against a password later?) See, most people tend to store the whole thing in a text column in a database such as MySQL. Text columns don't accept arbitrary binary, so you must either turn it into a blob column or use something like base64. It just makes your salt longer; the cryptographical strength is the same. –  kijin Nov 8 '10 at 2:21
    
@kijin i see what you are saying. But actually if you escape the binary prior to insert then it preserves the value. You can even store images in the database, mysql_real_escape_string(). –  rook Nov 8 '10 at 3:48
    
@Rook Even if you escape it, blob is the correct data type for binary values such as images. Text columns have a character set attached to them, which can mess up your binary depending on which DBMS you use. I wanted to provide an answer that plays nice with the varchar/text types that are usually assigned to password fields, so I stick to my recommendation that any binary salt should be base64 encoded. If you want to use blob to save some disk space, that's fine. –  kijin Nov 8 '10 at 4:07

Replace rand(0,61) with mt_rand(0, 61) and you should be fine (Since mt_rand is better at producing random numbers)...

But more important than strength of the salt is the way you hash it. If you have a great salt routine, but only do md5($pass.$salt), you're throwing away the salt. I personally recommend stretching the hash... For example:

function getSaltedHash($password, $salt) {
    $hash = $password . $salt;
    for ($i = 0; $i < 50; $i++) {
        $hash = hash('sha512', $password . $hash . $salt);
    }
    return $hash;
}

For more information on hash stretching, check out this SO answer...

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My function is:function stringHashing($saltedString){$hashedString=hash('sha256',$saltedString); return $hashedString; } –  JDelage Nov 5 '10 at 13:58

I would take advice from another answer and use mt_rand(0, 61), because the Mersenne Twister produces better entropy.

Additionally, your function is really two parts: generating random $nbLetters digits and encoding that in base62. This will make things much clearer to a maintenance programmer (maybe you!) who stumbles across it a few years down the road:

// In a class somewhere
private $chars = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ0123456789";

private function getBase62Char($num) {
    return $chars[$num];
}

public function generateRandomString($nbLetters){
    $randString="";

    for($i=0; $i < $nbLetters; $i++){
        $randChar = getBase62Char(mt_rand(0,61));
        $randString .= $randChar;
    }

    return $randomString;
}
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I think that a very good salt for example is the user name (if you are talking about pw hashing and the user name doesn't change.)

You don't need to generate anything and don't need to store further data.

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Not a bad idea, but you'd probably want at least to perform a trivial function on the username first. could be as simple as repeating it twice, or adding a character at the end. while what you suggest is mathematically sound, it could easily be guessed. –  jon_darkstar Nov 4 '10 at 18:14
3  
Who cares whether it can be guessed? The purpose of a salt is to prevent using one rainbow table for all hashes in a DB. And this does it's job. –  NikiC Nov 4 '10 at 18:16

A fairly simple technique:

$a = array('a', 'b', ...., 'A', 'B', ..., '9');
shuffle($a);
$salt = substr(implode($a), 0, 2);  // or whatever sized salt is wanted

Unlike uniqid() it generates a random result.

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I use this:

$salt = base64_encode(mcrypt_create_iv(PBKDF2_SALT_BYTES, MCRYPT_DEV_URANDOM));
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Base64 encoding can also return the characters '+' and '/', maybe this is not what the OP needs. Then the salt should be created for a specific algorithm with a given length, the length in your example is fix and difficult to predict. –  martinstoeckli Feb 27 '14 at 9:13

This is my method, It uses truly random numbers from atmospheric noise. It is all mixed in with pseudo-random values and strings. Shuffled and hashed. Here is my code: I call it overkill.

<?php
function generateRandomString($length = 10) {
    $characters = '0123456789abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ';
    $randomString = '';
    for ($i = 0; $i < $length; $i++) {
        $randomString .= $characters[rand(0, strlen($characters) - 1)];
    }
    return $randomString;
}

function get_true_random_number($min = 1, $max = 100) {
    $max = ((int) $max >= 1) ? (int) $max : 100;
    $min = ((int) $min < $max) ? (int) $min : 1;
    $options = array(
        CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER => true,
        CURLOPT_HEADER => false,
        CURLOPT_FOLLOWLOCATION => true,
        CURLOPT_ENCODING => '',
        CURLOPT_USERAGENT => 'PHP',
        CURLOPT_AUTOREFERER => true,
        CURLOPT_CONNECTTIMEOUT => 120,
        CURLOPT_TIMEOUT => 120,
        CURLOPT_MAXREDIRS => 10,
    );

    $ch = curl_init('http://www.random.org/integers/?num=1&min='
        . $min . '&max=' . $max . '&col=1&base=10&format=plain&rnd=new');
    curl_setopt_array($ch, $options);
    $content = curl_exec($ch);
    curl_close($ch);

    if(is_numeric($content)) {
        return trim($content);
    } else {
        return rand(-10,127);
    }
}

function generateSalt() {
    $string = generateRandomString(10);
    $int = get_true_random_number(-2,123);
    $shuffled_mixture = str_shuffle(Time().$int.$string);
    return $salt = md5($shuffled_mixture);
}

echo generateSalt();
?>

The atmospheric noise is provided by random.org. I have also seen truly random generation from images of lava lamps that are interpreted via hue and location. (Hue is location)

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If you want ultimate unique salt you should use a unique value entered and required by the user such as the email or the username, then hashing it using sha1 and then merge it - concatenate - with the salt value generated by your code.

Another, you have to extend $charUniverse by the mean of some special characters such as @,!#- etc.

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Here is a much better way if you have windows and cant do /dev/random.

//Key generator
$salt = base64_encode(openssl_random_pseudo_bytes(128, $secure));
//The variable $secure is given by openssl_random_ps... and it will give a true or false if its tru then it means that the salt is secure for cryptologic.
while(!$secure){
    $salt = base64_encode(openssl_random_pseudo_bytes(128, $secure));
}
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