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This must be a common question; however, I cannot seem to find a neat way of doing it.

How do I check if a number is positive or negative?

Thanks.

Edit: APOLOGIES FOR MY QUESTION. I was very very tired + I had a "liquid lunch" if you see what I mean. Oh well I will put it down as one of those embarrassing moments of mine. Thanks anyway.

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23  
So tempted to tag with wtf –  JLWarlow Nov 4 '10 at 17:37
10  
Stop downvoting the bloke, this is a good laugh! –  slashmais Nov 4 '10 at 17:51
34  
I don't get the downvotes. The question is in-scope for SO and is well written. I don't think downvotes are a valid way to indicate elitism regarding the knowledge level of the OP. Give the guy a chance. –  Jeff Yates Nov 4 '10 at 18:03
8  
+1 for being honest –  ThiefMaster Mar 2 '11 at 10:33
19  
And to those who got here by Google search :) –  Fixer Jan 27 '12 at 5:16

12 Answers 12

up vote 72 down vote accepted
bool positive = number > 0;
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25  
I must be very very very tired! makes me laugh how ridicolous my question was –  user9969 Nov 4 '10 at 17:26
4  
We all have our moments :-) –  Simon Fischer Nov 4 '10 at 17:27
9  
What about poor old negative zero?! –  Grant Crofton Nov 4 '10 at 17:30
3  
It's not ridiculous -- this person is learning. –  Lou Franco Nov 4 '10 at 17:30
2  
By definition, zero is not positive: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/0_(number) –  Simon Fischer Nov 4 '10 at 17:33

OVERKILL!

public static class AwesomeExtensions
{
    public static bool IsPositive(this int number)
    {
        return number > 0;
    }

    public static bool IsNegative(this int number)
    {
        return number < 0;
    }

    public static bool IsZero(this int number)
    {
        return number == 0;
    }

    public static bool IsAwesome(this int number)
    {
        return IsNegative(number) && IsPositive(number) && IsZero(number);
    }
}
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12  
I'm thinking about refactoring this with some delegates... –  hunter Nov 4 '10 at 17:33
14  
Internally, it should instantiate a class which implements ISignDeterminator using a SignDeterminatorFactory. –  Jesse C. Slicer Nov 4 '10 at 17:47
6  
Incomplete: you should check for IsNaN() as well ;) –  slashmais Nov 4 '10 at 17:55
3  
@slashmais: On an int?! What magical land of C# are you working in? –  Jeff Yates Nov 4 '10 at 18:01
21  
Where are the unit tests...? –  NotDan Nov 4 '10 at 19:27
num < 0 // number is negative
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2  
HAHAHAHAHAHA +1 –  Aren Nov 4 '10 at 17:25
10  
I assume that this is a beginner, which we should try to help. Once you learn the right way -- check this for the wrong way thedailywtf.com/Articles/… –  Lou Franco Nov 4 '10 at 17:27
1  
at first I could'nt believe the question on the main page, then I came here ... :) and this guy is not alone ... oh dear :) –  slashmais Nov 4 '10 at 17:41

Of course no-ones actually given the correct answer,

num != 0   // num is positive *or* negative!
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3  
ah. hahaha. took me a few moments to realize this is the correct answer :D –  VOX Jun 4 '13 at 20:14
    
+1 for being a smart arse :) –  Liam Jan 2 at 13:14

The Math.Sign method is one way to go. It will return -1 for negative numbers, 1 for positive numbers, and 0 for values equal to zero (i.e. zero has no sign). Double and single precision variables will cause an exception (ArithmeticException) to be thrown if they equal NaN.

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Wow didn't know this exists.What happens for NaN? –  Tanmoy Nov 4 '10 at 19:06
    
@Tanmoy: Looks like it will throw an exception in that case. –  gnovice Nov 4 '10 at 19:07
    
interesting...learn something new every day. –  townsean Nov 5 '10 at 13:50
1  
@AndyC: I enjoyed the humor, but he should be doing equality comparison against the return value of Math.Sign (since it explicitly defines possible return values.) –  robjb Oct 16 '11 at 22:52
1  
Very surprised to find out there's actually a function for this. –  l46kok Oct 8 '13 at 15:15

You youngins and your fancy less-than signs.

Back in my day we had to use Math.abs(num) != num //number is negative !

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(If it wasn't obvious, this was intended to be humor) –  Powerlord Nov 4 '10 at 17:31
1  
Does this code work for all signed integers? –  Eric Lippert Nov 5 '10 at 6:10
2  
@Eric: No, because it will throw an OverflowException if num is MinValue for whatever type is passed in (Int16, Int32, Int64). Results are even worse for floating point values, where they could also be NaN, since NaN != NaN. –  Powerlord Nov 5 '10 at 13:35
if (num < 0) {
  //negative
}
if (num > 0) {
  //positive
}
if (num == 0) {
  //neither positive or negative,
}

or use "else ifs"

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1  
Haha. "Either positive or negative". –  user166390 Nov 5 '10 at 6:45
    public static bool IsPositive<T>(T value)
        where T : struct, IComparable<T>
    {
        return value.CompareTo(default(T)) > 0;
    }
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For a 32-bit signed integer, such as System.Int32, aka int in C#:

bool isNegative = (num & (1 << 31)) != 0;
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public static bool IsNegative<T>(T value)
   where T : struct, IComparable<T>
{
    return value.CompareTo(default(T)) < 0;
}
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int j = num * -1;

if (j - num  == j)
{
     // Num is equal to zero
}
else if (j < i)
{
      // Num is positive
}
else if (j > i) 
{
     // Num is negative
}
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You just have to compare if the value & its absolute value are equal:

if (value == Math.abs(value))
    return "Positif"
else return "Negatif"
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1  
This technique is already covered by stackoverflow.com/a/4099428/497043 –  Chris Morgan Sep 21 '13 at 0:13

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