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I have an application that reads an input file with various user settings in it. Some of these settings apply to very specific classes that are instantiated at a very low level. But the input file is read and the settings are stored at the top level of the app.

What's the design pattern here for instantiating a low-level class (that's several links removed from the top level) using information that's read at the top level?

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up vote -1 down vote accepted

It's customary to have single global App object which contains global properties, so, low-level classes can access everything they need from that single point. If project is not very complex this solution is quite manageable.

As a variation you can have global application object implementing interfaces in which low-level classes interested and inject it at the construction time. Like (C#):

interface ITextFileProperties
{
   string Encoding;
}

interface IGraphicsFileProperties
{
   int Resolution;
}

interface IFileProperties : ITextFileProperties, IGraphicsFileProperties
{
}

static class App : IFileProperties
{
  public string Encoding = "UTF-8"; // ITextFileProperties

  public int Resolution = 1024; // IGraphicsFileProperties
}

class TextFile
{
  public TextFile(ITextFileProperties data)
  {
    _globalEncoding = data.Encoding;
  }
}

class GraphicsFile
{
  IGraphicsFileProperties properties;

  public GraphicsFile(IGraphicsFileProperties data)
  {
    properties = data; // in case we'll need it later, if it can change at run time, etc.
  }
}

class SomeObjectUsingFiles
{
   public SomeObjectUsingFiles(IFileProperties properties)
   {
     _globalProperties = properties;
   }

   public void ProcessText()
   {
     var textFile = new TextFile(_globalProperties);
   }

   public void ProcessGraphics()
   {
     var grFile = new GraphicsFile(_globalProperties);
   }
}

Pass to object only minimum information it needs. So you can keep your concrete "workhorse" classes (files) simple and loosely coupled and deal with parameter passing later, if needed.

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Very interesting, thanks a lot! – jjkparker Nov 8 '10 at 14:55

Have the top level deal with abstractions only, and use your platform's reflection library to instantiate the concrete types.

A factory class/provider can be useful, where you can pass it a set of properties that it can use to construct the concrete type.

Putting it all together, it might look like this in Java:

interface Factory<T> {
    public T create(Properties p);
}

class MyObjFactory implements Factory<MyObj> {
    public MyObj create(Properties p) {
        return new MyObj(p.get("name"));
    }
}

class MyObj {
    private String name;
    public MyObj(name) {
        this.name = name;
    }
}

Then MyObjFactory would be constructed reflectively, and could be used to construct a MyObj.

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