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I've looked at other definitions and explanations and none of them satisfy me. I want to see if anybody can define polymorphism in at most two sentences without using any code or examples. I don't want to hear 'So you have a person/car/can opener...' or how the word is derived (nobody is impressed that you know what poly and morph means). If you have a very good grasp of what polymorphism is and have a good command of English than you should be able to answer this question in a short, albeit dense, definition. If your definition accurately defines polymorphism but is so dense that it requires a couple of read overs, then that's exactly what I am looking for.

Why only two sentences? Because a definition is short and intelligent. An explanation is long and contains examples and code. Look here for explanations (the answer on those pages are not satisfactory for my question):

Polymorphism vs Overriding vs Overloading
Try to describe polymorphism as easy as you can

Why am I asking this question ? Because I was asked the same question and I found I was unable to come up with a satisfactory definition (by my standards, which are pretty high). I want to see if any of the great minds on this site can do it.

If you really can't make the two sentence requirement (it's a difficult subject to define) then it's fine if you go over. The idea is to have a definition that actually defines what polymorphism is and doesn't explain what it does or how to use it (get the difference?).

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29 Answers 29

up vote 52 down vote accepted

Polymorphism allows the expression of some sort of contract, with potentially many types implementing that contract (whether through class inheritance or not) in different ways, each according to their own purpose. Code using that contract should not(*) have to care about which implementation is involved, only that the contract will be obeyed.

(*) In the ideal case, anyway - obviously quite often the calling code has chosen the appropriate implementation very deliberately!

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Mark, did you at one point accept this answer and then unaccept it? I'm trying to work out what looks like a bug in the reputation system - this answer has given me a net of -15 rep for today, strangely enough. –  Jon Skeet Jan 3 '09 at 22:33
    
Same here, Jon - I have now 2 accepted answers with -15 rep. Not that I care but it is intriguing. –  Otávio Décio Jan 3 '09 at 22:39
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Strictly speaking, there is no requirement that "one type express some sort of contract". All that is really required is that multiple implementations can respond to the same message without the message sender needing to know or care which implementation is handling the message. –  Doug Knesek Nov 16 '09 at 15:20
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@Doug: If there's no contract, even implied through documentation or naming, then how on earth do you know it's going to do what you want it to? You talk about an "interface" in your own answer - which sounds very much like a contract to me - what do you see as the difference? Both "interface" and "contract" are words which can be used in a "strong" sense (e.g. enforced at compile-time) or very loosely (e.g. by naming convention and using dynamic typing). –  Jon Skeet Nov 16 '09 at 15:26
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@Downvoter: Care to comment? –  Jon Skeet Dec 16 '10 at 19:20

Fruit can be eaten, as a general rule, but different types of fruit is eaten in different ways. An apple, which is a fruit, can be eaten (because it is a fruit). A banana can also be eaten (because it is also a fruit), but in a different manner from an apple. You peal it first.

Well, at least I do, but I'm weird in some manners so what do I know.

This illustrates inheritance (fruit can be eaten), polymorphism (something that eats fruit can eat all types of fruit), and encapsulation (a banana has a skin).

Seriously though, object inheritance, polymorphism, encapsulation, virtual things, abstract things, private things, public things, these are all hard concepts. If someone absolutely wants to have a 2-sentence definition of this then please tag the question as a code-golf variant, because two such sentences will have to be so terse that unless you know what it is already you won't learn enough about it to know what you need to learn more about.

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lassevk: "unless you know what it is already you won't learn enough about it to know what you need to learn more about" << Just to clarify, that's what I am expecting. I'm looking for a definition that may take some thought to understand. Not one that would be used to teach a beginner. –  Mark Testa Jan 3 '09 at 23:10
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I gathered that, I just posted a somewhat humorous (to me anyway) answer :) Polymorphism and OOP is one of those big wall-things, where if you graph the learning curve, you just hit a big wall and either you crawl over it, or you don't. If you do, then you usually have a big AHA! experience... –  Lasse V. Karlsen Jan 4 '09 at 0:17
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Hemlock is a fruit too! You can eat it but only once! –  James Anderson Apr 7 '09 at 7:02

Polymorphism is declaring a uniform interface that isn't type aware, leaving implementation details to concrete types that implement the interface.

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Actually, there are multiple forms of polymorphism and there is quite some controversy over it; you may even see CS professors who cannot define it properly. I am aware of three types:

  • ad-hoc polymorphism (looks like a duck and walks like a duck => is a duck). Can be seen in Haskell and Python for example.

  • generic polymorphism (where a type is an instance of some generic type). Can be seen in C++ for example (vector of int and vector of string both have a member function size).

  • subtype polymorphism (where a type inherits from another type). Can be seen in most OO programming languages (i.e. Triangle is a Shape).

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1  
+1 for mentioning that there are different types of polymorphism. However, your definition of ad-hoc polymorphism seems to be quite different from the one mentioned at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Type_polymorphism . That page says there are 2 types (ad-hoc versus parametric), not 3, and also make a distinction between polymorphic functions and polymorphic data types. Your 3 types, as far as I can determine correspond to parametric polymorphic functions, parametric polymorphic data types, and ad-hoc polymorphic functions, respectively. –  Laurence Gonsalves Jul 5 '09 at 22:02

Wikipedia: Polymorphism is a programming language feature that allows values of different data types to be handled using a uniform interface. Pretty straightforward for me.

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I really understand, why you are asking this question. I understand polymorphism, but I was at a job interview and was asked to give short and clear definition of polymorphism. Because I couldn't give clear and short definition I started thinking about it and here is my definition:

The ability of objects of one type to have one and the same interface, but different implementation of this interface.

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Definition:

Polymorphism is a $10 word for a $1 idea - that when I ask for something to be done, I don't care how it is achieved as long as the end result is appropriate. As long as the service is provided correctly, I don't care about the implementation.

Discussion

While it's commonly used in software development, especially in systems developed following object oriented principles, Polymorphism is fundamentally a real world principle and should be defined in real world terms, not technological ones.

Examples

When I want to make a phone call, I pick up a phone, dial a number and talk to the party at the other end. I don't care about who made the phone, what technology it uses, whether it's wired, wireless, mobile or VOIP, or whether it's under warranty.

When I want to print a document, I print it. I don't care about the implementation language, brand of printer, style of connection, choice of consumable or quality of paper.

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sound like example of Encapsulation to me –  Singleton Dec 16 '10 at 19:01
    
Polymorphism, Encapsulation and Abstraction are all pretty closely related, though they focus on different perspectives. Good abstractions make polymorphism easier to achieve, and good encapsulation helps to prevent details "leaking". –  Bevan Dec 16 '10 at 21:47

Multiple implementations of the same interface.

Example: Many models of telephone implement the numeric keypad interface.

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Polymorphism is a software coding abstraction where several different underlying entities (usually data, but nit always) all share a common interface which allows them to look and act identical at runtime. We use this as a development technique to enforce consistent behavior over a wide range of similar, but not identical instances with an absolute minimal implementation, thus reducing the expectation for bugs and inconsistencies.

Paul.

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Polymorphism is a object oriented strategy used when designing object models, to help simplify the code. At it's core polymorphism is the ability to define two simillar yet different objects, and to then treat the two objects as if they are the same.

Ok that's hard....

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polymorphism == multiple classes + same method signatures + class-specific behavior.

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Multiple forms of a single object is called Polymorphism.

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Just thought I'd add my own interpretation of what polymorphism is: very generically, polymorphism is the act of providing a single interface to entities of different types.

That's rather generic, but that's the only way I can think of to wrap all three types of polymorphisms I know about: ad hoc, parametric and subtype. I'll go in more details below, and have sorted polymorphism types by name, alphabetically. The one you're interested on is most probably subtype polymorphism, which is the last one.

ad hoc polymorphism

ad hoc polymorphism is the act of providing multiple implementations of the same method for different parameter types. In OOP, it's generally known as method overloading. For example:

public String format(int a) {
    return String.format("%2d", a);
}

public String format(Date a) {
    return new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss'Z'").format(a);
}

Both format methods share a single interface but work on entities of different types.

Parametric polymorphism

Parametric polymorphism is the act of making a class (or method) work on a type that is itself a parameter of the class (or method). It's often referred to as generics.

For example, Java's List[T] expects a parameter T at instantiation time, and this parameter defines the type of the resulting object.

Note for purists that I'm purposefully ignoring raw types as I feel they'd just muddy the waters in this context.

List[String] and List[Date] share a single interface, but work on (and are) different types.

Subtype polymorphism

Subtype polymorphism is probably what you initially meant in your question: it's the act of providing a single interface to multiple implementations of the same type.

To use the customary example: Animal provides a contract that all implementations must respect. Dog is an Animal, and as such supports all operations that Animal declares. According to the Liskov substitution principle, this allows you to use an instance of Dog where an instance of Animal is expected (but not the other way around).

If Cat and Dog are both subclasses of Animal, then they share a single interface but are in fact different types.

I'm going off in a bit of a tangent here, but subtype polymorphism is (I think) the only one that allows overriding: the act of redefining the behaviour of a method defined by a parent class. This is often confused with overloading which, as we saw before, is a type of polymorphism and doesn't in fact need subclassing (nor does it need classes, really).

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Polymorphism

Different objects can respond to the same message in different ways, enable objects to interact with one another without knowing their exact type.

Via: http://www.agiledata.org/essays/objectOrientation101.html

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Polymorphism is a programming feature that allows an object to have many types ('shapes') and lets you treat it as any of those types depending on what you need to do without knowing or caring about its other types.

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Polymorphism is ability of an object to appear and behave differently for the same invocation. ex: each animal appear and sound differently ( when you hit it :) )

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Polymorphism is a feature of programming languages that allows an object to be treated as an instance of its supertype.

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Downvoter - Would you please explain why? –  TarkaDaal Jan 29 '13 at 13:15

Giving a single name to a set of analogous operations on different types. When done well, the analogy is obvious e.g. "adding" numbers arithmetically and "adding" strings by concatenation (which sums their lengths).

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This is the definition that I've always followed:

Two objects are polymorphic (with respect to a particular protocol) between them, if both respond to the same messages with the same semantic.

Polymorphism is about messages, is about being able to respond the same set of messages with the same semantic.

If two object CAN respond to empty? but the semantic of the message is different, then.. they are not polymorphic.

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Polymorphism at the lower level is the ability to invoke methods that are defined by the implementors of an interface from the interface instance.

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Polymorphism is language functionality allowing high-level algorithmic code to operate unchanged on multiple types of data. And the other sentence, whatever it was for... ;-P.

( The types C++ supports are listed and contrasted in my answer: Polymorphism in c++ )

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entities of same type (that is, implemented same interface or derived from same class), behave in different ways (under same method name)

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Polymorphism concept became a phenomenon lately. Here is the actual drift. Runtime defines which submethod should be invoked by a reference of a super class. Now, what does mean in practice? It means actually nothing. You can code simply without polymorphism. So, why? Because, if we haven't got the polymorphism, we had to memorize all the subclass functions definitions. Polymorphism saves us from this in practice.

You can define a list as follows:

List list = new List();

but if you check for IList, you can benefit of the interface as:

IList list = new List();

and use the IList reference freely. Assuming IList is also implemented in another class, you can use methods of that unknown class via again IList reference without trying to remember that class name. Marvelous, isn't it?

Now, more valuable information is coming:
Java is by default polymorphic, whereas .NET and C++ are not, in MS, you have to declare the base function virtual (and in .NET override keyword).

Also, there are 2 integral rules in polymorphism. One is inheritance (via interface impl. or via class extending) and the other is overriding. Without overriding, polymorphism doesn't exist. Note that method overloading (which always in a single class) is also a type of "minimalistic" polymorphism.

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1  
That's more than 2 sentences. –  Dangerous Mar 6 '13 at 14:47

I think implementation of methodes of same signature in different classes (having some sort of inherittance relation eithr using extends or implements)is method overriding and also polymorphism becaause in this way we are achiving many form of same method signature.

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For a given method signature, different method implementations are run for different, hierarchically related, classes.

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I answered in another for as well. but here we go again...

polymorphism : where an object behaves differently under different circumstances

For example take,

my aunt

aunt is an object and the relationship with me is me being her niece. She's nice to me and makes me cookies etc.

for her husband; she's a wife.

now we can see that this aunt object behaves differently. She acts as a wife . for example she clean cloths and prepare meals etc..

for her daughter she's a mother

now the aunt object behaves differently; she has the qualities of a mother.\

this is polymorphism

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I guess sometimes objects are dynamically called. You are not sure whether the object would be a triangle, square etc in a classic shape poly. example.

So, to leave all such things behind, we just call the function of derived class and assume the one of the dynamic class will be called.

You wouldn't care if its a sqaure, triangle or rectangle. You just care about the area. Hence the getArea method will be called depending upon the dynamic object passed.

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polymophism is when different objects respond to the same method in a different way. for example a car move in the road while a person walk in the road, those are two objects responding to the same road in a different way.

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A single class doing different methods is called polymorphism.

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