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Alright so I have a page that the user types in a date hits a button and a querystring is placed in my other page. I want this date that they typed to be placed into my sql statement. I am reading the querystring useing javascript at this point, but i cannot get it into my sql statement.

<!--
function querySt(ji) {
hu = window.location.search.substring(1);
gy = hu.split("&");
for (i=0;i<gy.length;i++) {
ft = gy[i].split("=");
if (ft[0] == ji) {
return ft[1];
}
}
}


var rundate = querySt("rundate");

document.write(rundate);
document.write("<br>");
-->

I was told to use a declare and set statement but i kept getting errors.. Any ideas I have been stuck on this for 2 days, im sure you all know how that feels.

selectdata= "SELECT............ Having dbo.BOOKINGS.BOOKED = CONVERT(INT, DATEADD(dd, DATEDIFF(dd, 0, '11-04-2010'), 0))+2
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1  
using javascript? java != javascript –  John Boker Nov 4 '10 at 18:44
    
do you have any ideas? –  MyHeadHurts Nov 4 '10 at 18:48
    
It's not really clear what you're trying to do. Typically javascript runs on the client-side (i.e. in the web browser) while SQL requests are performed on the server side (e.g. in a java servlet, a PHP page, an ASP.NET page, etc.). There's a big piece missing in your question. –  Jacob Mattison Nov 4 '10 at 18:50
    
I am using ASP, not asp.net. I am trying to get the rundate(querystring) into my sql statement where the date is. –  MyHeadHurts Nov 4 '10 at 18:55
    
OK, but again, the javascript runs on the client side, while the VBScript in the ASP page runs on the server side. So parsing the querystring on the client side is not going to help you. –  Jacob Mattison Nov 4 '10 at 18:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try breaking the problem down into parts. Ignore the sql stuff for now, just make sure your function is getting the string correctly and breaking out the "rundate" parameter. That part looks ok, as long as the line window.location.search; is actually getting a correct string.

Two suggestions that probably don't apply to your problem, but are good practice: use alert() rather than document.write(), and put "var" before local variables so they don't pollute global namespace. That is:

var gy = hu.split("&");

etc.

share|improve this answer
    
yeah the function is getting the correct information, thats why i had it write it to the page. the next step is to somehow get this information into my sql statement : ( and i have been searching everywhere –  MyHeadHurts Nov 4 '10 at 19:05

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