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In Java how do I go about determining what classes a class extends?

public class A{
}

public class B extends A{
}

public class C extends A{
}

public class D{
}

public class E extends B{
}

public class doSomething{

    public void myFunc(Class cls){
         //need to check that cls is a class which extends A
         //i.e. B, C and E but not A or D
    }
}

would cls.getSuperClass() do what I need?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 23 down vote accepted

The getSuperClass() approach would fail for E since its immediate superclass is not A, but B. Rather use Class#isAssignableFrom().

public void myFunc(Class cls){
     //need to check that cls is a class which extends A
     //i.e. B, C and E but not A or D

     if (cls != A.class && A.class.isAssignableFrom(cls)) {
         // ...
     }
}
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This is by far the best solution suggested, but I would add that trying to do this is a bit of a "code smell". You may want to try to find a better way to do it as Martin Broadhurst suggests. –  Justin Standard Nov 4 '10 at 20:08
    
@Justin: I realize that as well. Unfortunately, the argument is Class and the requirement states that A.class itself should not pass the check. Best would be to make A abstract and apply the strategy pattern, but that requires a concrete instance of A as argument, not Class<A>. I am not sure how that would affect the remnant of OP's design. Maybe the OP has his own valid reasons to choose Class as argument. The functional requirement has to be clarified more before we can give better design suggestions. –  BalusC Nov 4 '10 at 20:17
    
Is this being used for an actual business system or school project? –  Justin Standard Nov 5 '10 at 20:36

You should try to avoid type checking and instead implement functions in B, C and E that do what you want, have the A and D versions do nothing, and then call that function from within your doSomething class.

If you do type checking it's not very maintainable because when you add new classes you need to change the conditional logic.

It's this problem that classes and overriding are there to prevent.

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Yes, Class.getSuperclass() is exactly what you need.

Class<?> c = obj.getClass();
System.out.println(c.getSuperclass() == Some.class);
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Do you want == or equals (or does it not matter for class objects)? –  Michael McGowan Nov 4 '10 at 19:12
1  
and for class E would I have to iterate up the tree? –  sprocketonline Nov 4 '10 at 19:12
2  
@sprocketonline -- Yes. –  Jeremy Heiler Nov 4 '10 at 19:15

Use the instanceof keyword.

http://www.java2s.com/Tutorial/Java/0060__Operators/TheinstanceofKeyword.htm

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1  
I'm checking Class, not an object so I don't think instance of is appropriate. –  sprocketonline Nov 4 '10 at 19:14
    
Ohhhhh - sorry. –  Adam Rackis Nov 4 '10 at 19:16

If you want compile time checking, you can use Generics (Java 5 and up):

public void myFunc(Class<? extends A> cls) {
}

Passing in any Class not inherited from A generates a compile time error.

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    System.out.println(A.class.getSuperclass().getName());
    A a = new A();
    System.out.println(a.getClass().getSuperclass().getName());

Run that in a main method and check the output, you should be able to figure out the rest from there.
Also read up a bit about java reflection.

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