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I'm really new to Windows For programming and not quite sure what's the right way to go about programming.

This is my confusion.

I have a single form:

    public partial class ReconcilerConsoleWindow : Form
    {
        public ReconcilerConsoleWindow()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
            SetLogText("Started");

        }

        public void SetLogText(String text)
        {
            string logInfo = DateTime.Now.TimeOfDay.ToString() + ": " + text + Environment.NewLine;
            tbx_Log.AppendText(logInfo);
        }


    }

And in my Program.cs class I have the following code:

    static class Program
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// The main entry point for the application.
        /// </summary>
        [STAThread]
        static void Main()
        {
            Application.EnableVisualStyles();
            Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
            ReconcilerConsoleWindow window = new ReconcilerConsoleWindow();
            Application.Run(window);

            if (CallSomeMethod() == true)
            {
                 window.SetLogText("True");
            }                     

        }


    }

Now, once the window has been displayed by the Application.Run command, the program halts at that point. How can I do further processing while the window is up?

The above is just an example. My purpose is to read an XMl file and display a datagridview. Subsequently, I watch the XMl file for changes and everytime a change is made, I want to refresh the datagridview. However, once the console pops up, how can i continue with my program and make changes to the information displayed on the form on the fly?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Processing that occurs after Application.Run is usually triggered in the form's Load event handler. You can easily create a Load method in Visual Studio by double clicking any open space on the form.

This would look something like this.

    private void ReconcilerConsoleWindow_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (CallSomeMethod())
        {
            this.SetLogText("True");
        }
    }

The reason this is (as stated in several other answers) is that the main thread (the one that called Application.Run(window)) is now taken up with operating the Message Pump for the form. You can continue running things on that thread through messaging, using the form's or forms' events. Or you can start a new thread. This could be done in the main method, before you call Application.Run(window), but most people would do this in Form_Load or the form constructor, to ensure the form is set up, etc. Once Application.Run returns, all forms are now closed.

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uhm, that isn't really an answer to the question??! He can also start threads in the constructor or even in Main(). At best, this is part of an answer. –  Falcon Nov 4 '10 at 19:30
    
@Falcon, it's the most common beginner answer. Honestly if I start threads I usually do them from my Form_Load. –  C. Ross Nov 4 '10 at 19:32
    
Hmm, you beat me! –  dotalchemy Nov 4 '10 at 19:33
    
@Falcon: If he wants stuff to interact with the form, the safest place to start it up is in the Load event. By then, the form's ready to be messed with. Before that, controls may not be set up..and if you do it in Main(), even the form itself may not exist -- and it definitely won't be ready to interact with some other thread. –  cHao Nov 4 '10 at 19:34
1  
Alright. This works, but what if I want to call SetLogText from CallSomeMethod? In that class, if I create another instance on ReconcilerConsoleWindow and then call SetLogText using that instance, it does not write to the textbox of the form that has been launched previously. –  xbonez Nov 4 '10 at 19:38

Program.cs is not meant to have business rules, it should only call your Form and display it. All datagrid loading/refreshing/editing should be done at your Forms. You should be using the Events defined on Forms class, like: OnLoad, OnUnload, OnClose and many others etc.

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Application.Run starts the Windows event handling loop. That loop won't finish til your form closes, at which time anything you do to it won't matter anyway.

If you want to do something with your form, do it in the form's Load event handler.

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You are missing the concept. In a Windows Forms Application, your Main Thread is responsible for running the Form.

You can always use more Threads, but in Windows Forms I would recommend using a BackgroundWorker Component for parallel Tasks: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.componentmodel.backgroundworker.aspx

Or a Timer: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.windows.forms.timer.aspx

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Once Application.Run(window) is called, you'll want to handle subsequent things within the application window itself.

In the code view of the form, find the following (or add it)

private void ReconcilerConsoleWindow_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
//this is where you do things :)
            if (CallSomeMethod() == true)
            {
                 window.SetLogText("True");
            }
}
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