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Is it possible to use a numeric string like "123" as a key in a PHP array, without it being converted to an integer?

$blah = array('123' => 1);
var_dump($blah);

prints

array(1) {
  [123]=>
  int(1)
}

I want

array(1) {
  ["123"]=>
  int(1)
}
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6  
Since PHP is loosely typed, "123" == 123 for almost every purpose. What's the reason you want it specifically as a string (and having an int is bad)? –  ircmaxell Nov 4 '10 at 19:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 37 down vote accepted

No; no it's not:

From the manual:

A key may be either an integer or a string. If a key is the standard representation of an integer, it will be interpreted as such (i.e. "8" will be interpreted as 8, while "08" will be interpreted as "08").

Addendum

Because of the comments below, I thought it would be fun to point out that the behaviour is similar but not identical to JavaScript object keys.

foo = { '10' : 'bar' };

foo['10']; // "bar"
foo[10]; // "bar"
foo[012]; // "bar"
foo['012']; // undefined!
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6  
... shudders ... –  jameshfisher Dec 15 '13 at 15:50
15  
PHP, the server-side IE. –  Marek Maurizio Mar 23 at 15:03

You can typecast the key to a string but it will eventually be converted to an integer due to PHP's loose-typing. See for yourself:

$x=array((string)123=>'abc');
var_dump($x);
$x[123]='def';
var_dump($x);

From the PHP manual:

A key may be either an integer or a string . If a key is the standard representation of an integer , it will be interpreted as such (i.e. "8" will be interpreted as 8, while "08" will be interpreted as "08"). Floats in key are truncated to integer . The indexed and associative array types are the same type in PHP, which can both contain integer and string indices.

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The conversion is not due to loose typing; php determines whether the string looks numeric and then converts it. –  Ja͢ck Apr 9 '13 at 7:10

If you need to use a numeric key in a php data structure, an object will work. And objects preserve order, so you can iterate.

$obj = new stdClass();
$key = '3';
$obj->$key = 'abc';
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This is a very good suggestion. I am writing framework code and faced with someone passing an array that could have either "accidental" indexing: array('this', 'that') or "associative" indexing: array(123=>array('this', 'that')). Now, thanks to you, I can just typehint ;) +1 –  Just Plain High Dec 8 '13 at 9:09

My workaround is:

$id = 55;
$array = array(
  " $id" => $value
);

The space char (prepend) is a good solution because keep the int conversion:

foreach( $array as $key => $value ) {
  echo $key;
}

You'll see 55 as int.

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I ran into this problem on an array with both '0' and '' as keys. It meant that I couldn't check my array keys with either == or ===.

$array=array(''=>'empty', '0'=>'zero', '1'=>'one');
echo "Test 1\n";
foreach ($array as $key=>$value) {
    if ($key == '') { // Error - wrongly finds '0' as well
        echo "$value\n";
    }
}
echo "Test 2\n";
foreach ($array as $key=>$value) {
    if ($key === '0') { // Error - doesn't find '0'
        echo "$value\n";
    }
}

The workaround is to cast the array keys back to strings before use.

echo "Test 3\n";
foreach ($array as $key=>$value) {
    if ((string)$key == '') { // Cast back to string - fixes problem
        echo "$value\n";
    }
}
echo "Test 4\n";
foreach ($array as $key=>$value) {
    if ((string)$key === '0') { // Cast back to string - fixes problem
        echo "$value\n";
    }
}
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