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I'm trying to create a form along the lines of the following (I am aware that this is not valid HTML, but it hopefully illustrates what and why I am trying to do this):

<form method="post" action="test.php">
    <input type="text" name="teamName">
    <br />Players:
    <grouping name="players[]">
        <input type="text" name="firstName"><br />
        <input type="text" name="lastName"><br />
    </grouping>
    <input type="submit" value="submit">
</form>

Through javascript, I would then add the grouping element as many times as needed. When the form is submitted, I could then access the items in the grouping element as follows:

foreach ($players as $player) {
    $fName = $player->firstName;
    $lName = $player->lastName;
}

That is, before I start, I don't know how many players will be on the team, but I know what a player looks like. I want to keep this all on one screen, so that the user can add players to their team on one page, and I want to be able to add the grouping of fields as a group. However, I would also like that grouping to be stored as an array, instead of doing something like:

<form method="post" action="test.php">
    <input type="text" name="teamName">
    <br />Players:
    <input type="text" name="firstName[]"><br />
    <input type="text" name="lastName[]"><br />
    <input type="submit" value="submit">
</form>

which would mean that I could iterate through the individual elements in the grouping, but not through the grouping as a whole.

Any ideas how I might accomplish this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Looking at your structure, though, I'd recommend going for a more robust array structure:

foreach ($players as $i => $player) {
    $fName = $player->firstName;
    $lName = $player->lastName;

    echo '<input type="text" name="players['.$i.'][firstName]" value="'.$fName.'" />';
    echo '<input type="text" name="players['.$i.'][lastName]" value="'.$lName .'" />';

}

When you submit this, you'd get:

players => Array(
  [0] => Array (
    firstName => a name,
    lastName => another name,
  ),
  [1] => Array (
    firstName => a name,
    lastName => another name,
  ),
etc...
)

Alternatively, rather than generating $i in the foreach statement, you could do an incrementing $i++ in the last input field, but I find for debugging purposes it's often nice to know which index your using from the original array.

I recommend this approach over your question's example, as it also allows you to do a count/iterate through $_POST['players']

Hope this helps

share|improve this answer
    
Would this work if I just did something like name="players[][firstName]" and name="players[][lastname]"? –  Elie Nov 4 '10 at 20:31
1  
Hrm. Just realized this was my first stackoverflow answer...wow. Didn't realize I've been such a lurker. Thanks for tweeting about the question and provoking me to act. –  Joseph Fung Nov 4 '10 at 20:32
1  
No, you'd then be essentially doing players[0][firstName] and players[1][lastName]. Each instance of [] would increment the array pointer. –  Joseph Fung Nov 4 '10 at 20:33
    
Just realized that. Urgh. Getting closer to an answer though. What you proposed would certainly work, but I'm not sure how to then add groups dynamically - how would my javascript know how many groupings had already been created? –  Elie Nov 4 '10 at 20:40

This sounds like a job for: <fieldset>

wrap your <input> elements in a <fieldset> element, and possibly give the fieldset an ID, some classes, or whatever you'd like.

then make sure that the input names use the correct array structure:

players[NUMBER][firstName] and players[NUMBER][lastName] should work fine (NUMBER of course being replaced by an index).

Don't forget to give your <input> elements a <label> for accessibility. Giving the <fieldset> a <legend> is a good idea as well.

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The issue was not about how to group the elements, it was how to avoid coding that number into the field names. Writing something like players[][firstName] is what I'm trying to do, except that would create a new array element for each field. Writing something like players[firstName][] would automatically create the appropriate index number, but would then involve iterating in a strange manner. –  Elie Nov 5 '10 at 2:37
    
Yea, I've yet to find a way to avoid manually specifying the number. –  zzzzBov Nov 5 '10 at 3:05

Multiple ways of solving this:

1) create a counter $i = 0 outside of your loop and inside of it do $i++. Instead of naming firstName[] use firstName[<?php echo $i; ?>]

2) If it's literally just the first and the second name - you can use a single <input> and then parse it in php.

Good Luck

share|improve this answer
    
It's actually about a dozen fields, some text, some numbers, and a date. Parsing a single input field wouldn't really work. The fields will be added to the form dynamically using Javascript, which may or may not know how many such fields have already been added to the screen. Thanks for the help and suggestion, though –  Elie Nov 4 '10 at 20:22
    
php-related note: pre-incrementing your variables is slightly faster than post-incrementing in php (this is only true for php). instead of $i++, choose ++$i. –  zzzzBov Nov 5 '10 at 3:44

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