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I have the below Delphi code to provide a friendly wrapper for the CreateProcess API call.

function StartProcess(ExeName: string; CmdLineArgs: string = '';
  ShowWindow: boolean = True; WaitForFinish: boolean = False): integer;
const
  c_Wait = 100;
var
  StartInfo: TStartupInfo;
  ProcInfo: TProcessInformation;
begin
  //Simple wrapper for the CreateProcess command
  //returns the process id of the started process.
  FillChar(StartInfo,SizeOf(TStartupInfo),#0);
  FillChar(ProcInfo,SizeOf(TProcessInformation),#0);
  StartInfo.cb := SizeOf(TStartupInfo);

  //this block is the only part of execution that is different
  //between my two calls.  What am I doing wrong with these flags?
  if not(ShowWindow) then begin
    StartInfo.dwFlags := STARTF_USESHOWWINDOW or STARTF_USESTDHANDLES;
    StartInfo.wShowWindow := SW_HIDE;
  end;

  CreateProcess(nil,PChar(ExeName + ' ' + CmdLineArgs),nil,nil,False,
    CREATE_NEW_PROCESS_GROUP + NORMAL_PRIORITY_CLASS,nil,nil,StartInfo,
    ProcInfo);

  Result := ProcInfo.dwProcessId;

  if WaitForFinish then begin
    while IsProcessRunning(Result) do begin
      Sleep(c_Wait);
    end;
  end;

end;

I am using it to start a batch file, and wait for the batch file to return. It works nicely as long as I leave the "ShowWindow" value as True. If I try to hide the command line window, then it returns immediately with no error. Can anyone help me understand my mistake here? Example usage is below with comments.

//this will not show the cmd line window, and it will return immediately
StartProcess('C:\run_me.bat','',False,True);

//this will show the cmd line, and (correctly) wait for the job to finish
StartProcess('C:\run_me.bat','',True,True);

An odd thing is when the window is hidden, I still get a process ID back, as if it started. But it quits so fast that I can't see it in the task manager.

If I change the batch file to have a "pause" at the end of it (so it will never really finish), I still get the same result. So it appears that the process really does not start when I set the flags in the "if not(ShowWindow)" block of my code.

After Rob Kennedy's suggestions, my code looks like this:

function StartProcess(ExeName: string; CmdLineArgs: string = '';
  ShowWindow: boolean = True; WaitForFinish: boolean = False): integer;
var
  StartInfo: TStartupInfo;
  ProcInfo: TProcessInformation;
begin
  //Simple wrapper for the CreateProcess command
  //returns the process id of the started process.
  FillChar(StartInfo,SizeOf(TStartupInfo),#0);
  FillChar(ProcInfo,SizeOf(TProcessInformation),#0);
  StartInfo.cb := SizeOf(TStartupInfo);

  if not(ShowWindow) then begin
    StartInfo.dwFlags := STARTF_USESHOWWINDOW;
    StartInfo.wShowWindow := SW_HIDE;
  end;

  CreateProcess(nil,PChar(ExeName + ' ' + CmdLineArgs),nil,nil,False,
    CREATE_NEW_PROCESS_GROUP + NORMAL_PRIORITY_CLASS,nil,nil,StartInfo,
    ProcInfo);

  Result := ProcInfo.dwProcessId;

  if WaitForFinish then begin
    WaitForSingleObject(ProcInfo.hProcess,Infinite);
  end;

  //close process & thread handles
  CloseHandle(ProcInfo.hProcess);
  CloseHandle(ProcInfo.hThread);
end;
share|improve this question
2  
Note that this function leaks a thread handle and a process handle. And if you really want to block return of this function until the process stops running, then skip the loop just call WaitForSingleObject(ProcInfo.hProcess, Infinite). –  Rob Kennedy Nov 4 '10 at 20:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

When you set ShowWindow = False, you set the startup flags to include StartF_UseStdHandles, but you never provide any values for the standard I/O handles. The moment the new process attempts to write any output, it will fail because it doesn't have a valid output handle.

If you're not going to provide values for the handles, then don't tell CreateProcess that the handle fields have valid values in them. Omit that flag from the startup flags.

You don't get any error when creating the process because creating the process went fine. It's only after the process started running that it ran into problems. You're not checking the process's exit code, so there's no way you'd detect any failure.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks Rob, I've posted my revised version above, and it works very well. That's what I get for cobbling together examples from all over the web. One other question... I see the memory leak, but what is the best practice for freeing a structure allocated with FillChar? I see two ideas on the web: 1) Define a constant that is just like the structure, and assign it (empty) to the local instance, or 2) run the local instance through another function that specifies an OUT parameter. Both of those seem hacky to me. –  JosephStyons Nov 5 '10 at 17:07
1  
FillChar doesn't allocate anything. You're not leaking structures. I said you're leaking handles, so look through the code to find the function that allocates handles. If you haven't read the documentation for CreateProcess, start there. It tells you want to do with the handles. –  Rob Kennedy Nov 5 '10 at 17:20
    
Thanks Rob. I looked at the CreateProcess documentation, and it pointed me to the "Creating Processes" guide, which led me to add the CloseHandle() calls on the process and thread handles. The code example above now includes that. –  JosephStyons Nov 5 '10 at 17:32

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