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First, this can be a general algorithm for any language, but I'm learning C and if there is some C specific features, I'd like to know!

I'm writing a function that will allocate enough memory for a given number of bits; into a long long * variable. The number of bits cannot be < 1. I tested the algorithm :

int bits;  // the function argument, checked for value > 0
size_t dataSize;  // the value passed to the malloc function

for (bits = 1; bits<100; bits++) {
   if (bits < sizeof(long long)) {
      dataSize = 1;
   } else {
      dataSize = (bits + (sizeof(long long) - (bits % sizeof(long long)))) / sizeof(long long);
   }

   printf("%d = %d\n", bits, (int) dataSize);
}

It looks ok... but ugly :) Any way to have a more elegant way to achieve this? Thank you!

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I don't fully understand your question. can't you just do dataSize = sizeof(int) * bits + padding ? where padding is extra bytes you want to allocate besides the bare minimum –  jbremnant Nov 4 '10 at 20:24
3  
A comment to all the answers, really, but why assume that there is 8 bits in a byte when there is a perfectly good macro CHAR_BIT that will make the answers more portable? –  Christoffer Nov 4 '10 at 20:46

8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Assuming you want to initialize your bit-field to zero, calloc() might be preferable to malloc(); you probably also should use an unsigned type to avoid signed shifts when twiddling bits.

#include <limits.h>

const size_t BITS_PER_BLOCK = sizeof (long long) * CHAR_BIT;
size_t count = bits / BITS_PER_BLOCK + !!(bits % BITS_PER_BLOCK);
unsigned long long *blocks = calloc(count, sizeof *blocks);

The !! is a somewhat hackish way to convert non-zero values to 1, which is common in C and used here to allocate an additional block if the number of bits is not divisible by BITS_PER_BLOCK.

You could also get the required number of blocks (as - among others - Lars pointed out in the comments to another answer) via

size_t count = (bits + BITS_PER_BLOCK - 1) / BITS_PER_BLOCK;

I find the former version more readable, but as the latter is also quite common - it's a special case of a more general rounding algorithm using integer arithmetics - a C programmer should be comfortable with either choice.

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the decimal value will most likely never be used directly, only the bits. Shifting bits, even for signed value does not (or seems not) affect the bit representation for both types... or am I missing something? –  Yanick Rochon Nov 4 '10 at 20:46
    
@Yanick: depending on the architecture, right-shifting signed values might insert ones instead of zeros; this can bite you if you combine values accross block boundaries, eg if you do something like (blocks[42] >> x) | (blocks[43] << (BITS_PER_BLOCK - x)); I generally only use unsigned values for bit arrays, even if signed values work fine in most cases –  Christoph Nov 4 '10 at 21:06
    
If you are going to divide anyway, why not just do: (bits + BITS_PER_BLOCK - 1)/BITS_PER_BLOCK? Simpler and does not require two divide operations. –  MSN Nov 4 '10 at 21:12
    
@MSN: artistic freedom, but edited my answer... –  Christoph Nov 4 '10 at 21:42
    
good to know (about signed shifting) and calloc, etc. –  Yanick Rochon Nov 4 '10 at 21:51

Unless I'm missing something, I think it would just be:

int bits;
size_t dataSize;

dataSize = bits / (sizeof(long long) * 8);
if( bits % (sizeof(long long) * 8) ) { //Don't add 1 if it was evenly divisible
    dataSize++;
}
dataSize *= sizeof(long long)

So assuming a long long size of 8 bytes, a value of 1-64 would return 8, 65-128 would return 16, etc.

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I had originally written that the long long pointer didn't matter, but it would be best to make sure that the size of the memory is divisible by the size of the long long, since it will try to fetch all 8 bytes when referencing it. –  user470379 Nov 4 '10 at 20:29
2  
I like using this approach to handle the '+1' in one step: 'dataSize = (bits + sizeof(long long)* 8 - 1)/(sizeof(long long) * 8)' . –  Lars Nov 4 '10 at 20:30
    
Why the -1? ... –  user470379 Nov 4 '10 at 20:39
    
@Lars, yes, I like that one liner too –  Yanick Rochon Nov 4 '10 at 20:42
2  
Because of the '-1', the addition will cause the dividend to 'overflow' into the next multiple of (sizeof(long long)*8), except when the number of bits is an even multiple of (sizeof(long long)*8) already. The mathematics might be easier to understand if you just looked at (bits + 7)/8, and then evaluated this for bits values 0 through 10 (it's how grokked it when I saw this formula for the first time). –  Lars Nov 4 '10 at 20:59

If you want n bits, then the correct expression to calculate the amount of long long is:

int bits = n;
int items = (((bits - 1) / CHAR_BIT) / sizeof(long long)) + 1;
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You shouldn't need a loop for this. If you do a division of bits / sizeof(long long), you should get a rounded-down result. You can then check the remainder by doing a modulus of bits % sizeof(long long), and if it is non-zero, you will need to add one to your result.

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the loop is for testing purpose only. It shows how much bytes I need for the number of bits. –  Yanick Rochon Nov 4 '10 at 20:37
size_t len_needed(int bits) {
   size_t x=  bits/(sizeof(long long) * 8);
   x = (bits%(sizeof(long long) * 8) ? 1 : 0;

   return x;
}

The ? : thing is just the ternary operator, which is a short way to do an if/else that evaluates to a value.

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This is your code with just a new value added to the printf

int bits;  // the function argument, checked for value > 0
size_t dataSize;  // the value passed to the malloc function

for (bits = 1; bits<100; bits++) {
   if (bits < sizeof(long long)) {
      dataSize = 1;
   } else {
      dataSize = (bits + (sizeof(long long) - (bits % sizeof(long long)))) / sizeof(long long);
   }

   printf("%d = %d (%d)\n", bits, (int) dataSize, 1 + bits/sizeof (long long));
   /*             ^^^^^                         ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ */
}
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Number_of_long_longs_for_x= (x + sizeof(long long) - 1)/sizeof(long long)

Now, the number of bits in a long long is log2(ULLONG_MAX+1), not sizeof(long long). So you should revisit your calculation.

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Umm, a downvote for this? Really? –  MSN Nov 4 '10 at 21:11
#define SIZEOF_LL  sizeof(long long)
nbytes  =  (xbits  + 8         - 1) / 8;
nllongs =  (nbytes + SIZEOF_LL - 1) / SIZEOF_LL;

or if you know the sizes.

nbytes =  (xbits  + 7) / 8;
nllongs = (nbytes + 7) / 8;
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