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I have a data frame with a response variable, Y, and three factors, 'factor.a', 'factor.b', and 'factor.c'

I am trying to write a function that will

  1. remove a columns from a data frame if all levels of the factor are the same

  2. add the terms 'beta.factor.x[1..n]' to a vector of parameters when there is more than one level of a factor, up to 5 levels.

  3. exclude the parameter beta.factor.b[1] from in the list (it is fixed)

Here is my code. I think it looks nice and works well, but I have read that it is best to avoid nested for loops, so I am curious if there is a more efficient approach.

data <- data.frame(       y = c(1,2,3,4),
                   factor.a = c(1, 1, 2, 1),
                   factor.b = c(1, 2, 2, 3),
                   factor.c = c(0, 0, 0, 0))

model.parms <- list(factor.a  = length(unique(data$factor.a)),
                    factor.b  = length(unique(data$factor.b)),
                    factor.c  = length(unique(data$factor.c)))
vars <- 'beta.o'
for (x in c('factor.a','factor.c', 'factor.b')) {
  if(model.parms[[x]] == 1) {
    data <- data[, -which(names(data) == x)]
  } else {
    m <- min(model.parms[[x]], 5)
    for (i in 1:m) {
      if(!i == 1 && x == 'factor.b') {
        vars <- c(vars, paste('beta.', x, '[', i, ']', sep=''))
      }
    }
  }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You don't need any loops at all

vars <- c('beta.o',
  paste('sd.', names(model.parms)[model.parms > 1], sep = ''),
  paste('beta.factor.b', '[', 1 +  seq_len(min(model.parms[["factor.b"]], 5) - 1), ']', sep='')
)
data <- data[, names(model.parms)[model.parms > 1]]
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This looks very nice, and certainly points me in the right direction for simplifying my code, but I notice two things: first, 'x' is not defined in your answer (it was in my for loop, and second, the number of vars to be added needs to change for each factor. –  David Nov 5 '10 at 14:30
1  
I changed the code. Now it should yield the same result as your code. Allthough I notice that you omited the part with sd. in your orginal code. –  Thierry Nov 6 '10 at 10:53
    
Thanks. I removed sd just to simplify the question. your approach works nicely. –  David Nov 11 '10 at 2:34
    
what about the case where either model.parms[['factor.b']] == 1? –  David Nov 17 '10 at 23:02

You can often void nested loops with by(). Taking your data frame,

> out <- by(data,data[,-1],identity)
> out

will get you

factor.a: 1
factor.b: 1
factor.c: 0
  y factor.a factor.b factor.c
1 1        1        1        0
------------------------------------------------------------ 
factor.a: 2
factor.b: 1
factor.c: 0
NULL
------------------------------------------------------------ 
factor.a: 1
factor.b: 2
factor.c: 0
  y factor.a factor.b factor.c
2 2        1        2        0
------------------------------------------------------------ 
factor.a: 2
factor.b: 2
factor.c: 0
  y factor.a factor.b factor.c
3 3        2        2        0
------------------------------------------------------------ 
factor.a: 1
factor.b: 3
factor.c: 0
  y factor.a factor.b factor.c
4 4        1        3        0
------------------------------------------------------------ 
factor.a: 2
factor.b: 3
factor.c: 0
NULL

if you unclass(out), you will get a matrix or array of mode list; each element will contain the rows of the original data frame that is aggregated by the levels specified in the second argument of by(). Of course, you can replace the identity function with another function that operates on that subset of the data frame (the output will always be a matrix or array, but not necessarily of mode list, depending on what you return from your function).

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